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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i been on vakay all week. i didn't go anywhere really, just day trips here and there. yesterday i went to the harley factory in york pennsylvania (yawn) 2 hours of riding for a shitty 10 minute tour.

but today i went to prs in stevensville. now those guys know how to do a tour! they show you almost everything, and explain any question you might have. it was really interesting, the people were very nice, and if any of you are interested, they are hiring. i couldn't take pics out in the factory, but i took a few where i was allowed. if you are ever down this way, go see it! p/m me first, and i will go too! i had alot of fun there.



the very first prs guitar ever



me, just burnin it down on a guitar i could never afford. see how my fingers are blurred? that's cause i was soooo bad-ass for at least 2.5 seconds

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Now THAT sounds like a day well spent!

There's just something about the smell of a place that works with wood, isn't there? I'll bet if you smelled it all over again, you'd get a good feeling before you even realized why.

Hope your fingers unblur soon. That's gotta hurt. ;)
smells are related to memory, just like you say.
the environmental controls in there are top-notch. i mean, in my 30 years of doing it, the work i saw today was among the best i've seen, and all of the materials and equipment was the best stuff. i can't help but look at that stuff no matter where i am. but anyhow, point is, the wood smell, even standing right next to a guy sanding a top, is almost non-existent. most folks in there don't even wear a mask. in the area where they apply the finish, you can smell that just a little. the energy costs for that facility must be insane.


oh, also, i want to mention. i looked around at the people while they were working. i looked at their workstations. everyone there seemed like they were happy. no idle hands, but you could detect no attitude by their faces, or the personal touches in their work area. tools well cared for, and areas properly lit. i look at moral too, i can't help it. running a sheetmetal shop is not that different than a factory. about a 3rd or more were women, and they occupied all facets of the build process. oh, and i also got to look at the amplifier section too. if i understood correctly, they are made overseas, shipped to prs, torn apart and inspected, re assembled and boxed up again. i saw them in various stages of assembly. they really are inspected thoroughly.
lastly, i wish i could have gotten a picture of this - the biggest bandsaw blade ever. it was cartoon size huge.
 

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lastly, i wish i could have gotten a picture of this - the biggest bandsaw blade ever. it was cartoon size huge.
I wish you could have snapped that pic, too, bro. I'm not sure whether to have a nightmare or a daydream. :)

I suspect the feeling you got in there was probably related to the feeling I get whenever I walk into the Lee Valley Tools store near us: people enjoying their work providing things for other people that they can use productively, and don't let them down. Would that all jobs could be like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, seems like a really nice place to visit!
Did you visit the "custom shop" space? Did you saw someone working on those dragon inlayed necks?
sort of. i did visit the custom shop area, but i didn't see anything with the dragon inlays. that said, i did see some REALLY cool stuff in various stages of the build. one of them was a red & black custom 24. one of the coolest bursts i ever saw. the highly figured top looked like nothing i've seen recently. their custom shop area is like a mini production line too, sorta. there is alot of hand work done to them. according to the guide, only their best people work that area, and they each specialize in certain areas of the build. there are a few that are entirely built by one guy or another, but most of the custom shop stuff comes through the main production facility part of the way, and then is transferred to the "special" area where the masters are.
one guy asked a question about fingerboards. part of the answer confirmed something. snake oil does nothing for the fretboard. it is entirely a cosmetic thing, and has no real function outside of that.
 
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