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Yesterday (April 6th), I went to my L & M in Fredericton to play some acoustics. It was a little of an eye opener for me as well as interesting. I played a Seagull 6 string and also their Coastline 12 string. I also played several Martins; a DX1RAE, GPC4, D18 and a D28. Here is what I found.

The Seagull 6 string (S6) was okay but didn't jump out at me. I was most impressed with the Coastline 12 string. I have been toying with the idea of picking up a 12 string and IMHO it sparkled. It really has that 12 string shimmering tone that I love. Onto the Martins.

They were all good to me. The HD-28 had the "best" tone in my opinion. I say best because it sounded great, with a wonderful balanced tone and strong on the bass side as Martins tend to be. It was also the most different to what I normally here from my Alavez MD60. The DX1RAE and GCP4 were similar and the D-18 was similar to the DX1RAE and GPC4 but with more volume and perhaps a little more bass. One of the things that surprised me is that the D-18 is not a whole lot different than my Alvarez which shouldn't be too surprising seeing they are both built with a solid spruce top and solid mahogany back and sides.

To sum it all up. I am more interested to grab a 12 string but would like to try out the Alvarez AD60-12 before I make my decision. I have been hankering for an HD-28 too but it is $4000.00 and while it is a great sounding and beautiful looking guitar, it's just not $4000.00 better than my MD60. Alvarez also makes the MD70 with Indian Rosewood back and sides similar to the HD-28. I wonder how close that sounds to an HD-28.

Kudos too, to my local L & M. Most of the guitars I tried seemed to be in tune. I only adjusted a couple of strings on two the guitars I played.
 
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That was the HD-28V? I didn’t buy the one they had here, I’m kind of regretting it.

There was one in Regina, but now the closest ones are in Edmonton and Vancouver.
 

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That was the HD-28V? I didn’t buy the one they had here, I’m kind of regretting it.

There was one in Regina, but now the closest ones are in Edmonton and Vancouver.
Yes, I was in a couple of months ago and it wasn't there, neither was the D-18, I don't think but they nad a D-18, D-28 and HD-28. I would suggest you try an Alvarez MD70 series before you buy and HD-28 and also an Eastman E8D, E20D and E40D. If you have not done so, you will likely be pleasantly surprised.
 

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While I can appreciate the D-28, my preference is usually for the D-18. I played one at Long & McQuade on Bloor St. here in Toronto that was a good one. I also played a really nice used 000-18 there, but it sold quickly. That said, if I get another acoustic, I’ll probably order it from Ed Bond (Halcyon Guitars). My NL-00 is just wonderful.
 

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Yesterday (April 6th), I went to my L & M in Fredericton to play some acoustics. It was a little of an eye opener for me as well as interesting. I played a Seagull 6 string and also their Coastline 12 string. I also played several Martins; a DX1RAE, GPC4, D18 and a D28. Here is what I found.

The Seagull 6 string (S6) was okay but didn't jump out at me. I was most impressed with the Coastline 12 string. I have been toying with the idea of picking up a 12 string and IMHO it sparkled. It really has that 12 string shimmering tone that I love. Onto the Martins.

They were all good to me. The HD-28 had the "best" tone in my opinion. I say best because it sounded great, with a wonderful balanced tone and strong on the bass side as Martins tend to be. It was also the most different to what I normally here from my Alavez MD60. The DX1RAE and GCP4 were similar and the D-18 was similar to the DX1RAE and GPC4 but with more volume and perhaps a little more bass. One of the things that surprised me is that the D-18 is not a whole lot different than my Alvarez which shouldn't be too surprising seeing they are both built with a solid spruce top and solid mahogany back and sides.

To sum it all up. I am more interested to grab a 12 string but would like to try out the Alvarez AD60-12 before I make my decision. I have been hankering for an HD-28 too but it is $4000.00 and while it is a great sounding and beautiful looking guitar, it's just not $4000.00 better than my MD60. Alvarez also makes the MD70 with Indian Rosewood back and sides similar to the HD-28. I wonder how close that sounds to an HD-28.

Kudos too, to my local L & M. Most of the guitars I tried seemed to be in tune. I only adjusted a couple of strings on two the guitars I played.

I love it when I come upon positivity instead of the many negative comments so commonly found. Kudos to Steadfastly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
While I can appreciate the D-28, my preference is usually for the D-18. I played one at Long & McQuade on Bloor St. here in Toronto that was a good one. I also played a really nice used 000-18 there, but it sold quickly. That said, if I get another acoustic, I’ll probably order it from Ed Bond (Halcyon Guitars). My NL-00 is just wonderful.
I agree on the D-18. That HD-28 was nice, though but the D-18 is just a little more "lively" I would call it due to the difference in mahogany vs. rosewood.
 
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I have both the HD 28 (1991) and Seagull S6 (wide nut). Very different price points and construction. The Martins, especially scalloped-braced, are sensitive to humidity and love fresh strings. If you play 5 different HD-28's off the wall, you'll see that they have individual personalities. Change string brands/type, and it's a different guitar. Change pick thickness, and it's new again. Typical hi-fi finicky stuff!

The Seagull is a great campfire/loaner guitar...it's a fantastic bargain and is less fussy about humidity. The headstock is ugly and disturbingly phallic, though.

In order to justify spending $4,000, it better be THE guitar that you can't un-hear once you leave the shop. If it haunts you as you continue your quest, and you have the cash, then do it. Preferably a pre-owned one with a few years under its belt.
 

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I have both the HD 28 (1991) and Seagull S6 (wide nut). Very different price points and construction. The Martins, especially scalloped-braced, are sensitive to humidity and love fresh strings. If you play 5 different HD-28's off the wall, you'll see that they have individual personalities. Change string brands/type, and it's a different guitar. Change pick thickness, and it's new again. Typical hi-fi finicky stuff!

The Seagull is a great campfire/loaner guitar...it's a fantastic bargain and is less fussy about humidity. The headstock is ugly and disturbingly phallic, though.

In order to justify spending $4,000, it better be THE guitar that you can't un-hear once you leave the shop. If it haunts you as you continue your quest, and you have the cash, then do it. Preferably a pre-owned one with a few years under its belt.
NashvilleDeluxe, I see you live in Quebec.

I'm a novice... and if you don't mind, I'd like some advice.
I bought a Martin 000-16GT in July 2017... and just as you described, during the winter, I found it was affected by the dry air in the house, so when not being played, it's kept humidified in it's case and I check it's (in case) humidity gauge, every 2 days.

With advice from my guitar teacher... (for the same reasons you described), this winter I also bought a 000 size Godin Art and Lutherie Legacy, which doesn't need extra care and just sits on a stand. (It's got a great sound for the money.)

I love both guitars... but I'm considering also buying a larger size.

Questions:
1. I was thinking of buying a Seagull Artist Mosaic Element (Mahogany) or a Simon and Patrick - Showcase Mahogany. I like the S&P head stock better, but can't find a salesperson in the greater Montreal region who as deep knowledge of the 2 brands and their differences (apart from the headstock). For some reason stores, which I've visited/phoned, carry only a selection of the lower end models. They tell me there's little demand in Quebec. (They have lots of Taylors, Martins and Gibsons). When I talk with others outside the province, S&P and Seagulls seem to be more available. Maybe it's a case of the pastures are always greener...
Any store/salesperson you would recommend? Or should I be looking for another mid range brand?

2. If I decide to trade/sell my 000-16GT for a larger Martin, is there a store you would recommend... possibly a place which takes consignments?

3. If I were to take out a 2nd mortgage, should I consider a Boucher instead of a Martin?
Home - Guitares Boucher

Thanks in advance, Bill
 

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Hi, Bill,

I'm afraid I'm not going to be of much use to you. I buy infrequently, and when I do it's usually on the used market. I do all my own mods and repairs, so I'm not in the shops much.

With regards to humidity, the sound-hole ones are better than nothing, but they won't do much to prevent fret sprout. I use one when I play out, but not at home. I have a whole-house humidifier system that's monitored (cell phone bleeps if humidity gets lower than 45%).

1. The only stores that come to mind that might carry the Artist would be Long and McQuade and Nantel music in Laval. If they don't have it in stock, they can surely get one.
There's this one, for about $400 less than new: Seagull Artist Mosaic Acoustic Guitar | Guitars | Markham / York Region | Kijiji

2. I do not know who does consignment. I'd be more inclined to sell privately, and buy on the used market. I'm an Irish cheapskate with nice toys...it's a conundrum.

3. I know nothing about Boucher. Comparing new vs. used prices, I'm seeing some pretty big price drops in the used market. They look like fantastic instruments, but the lesser-known name on the headstock will hurt you if you go to sell it. I've only played two other guitars that I'd put on par with my HD-28...an HD 28V (and don't like the neck shape), and a Bourgeois Country Boy. I'm definitely not a fan of Taylors, and have played a bunch.
 

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Thanks for the info...
I have a sound-hole humidifier and a second humidifier near the head stock... but I'll get a room humidifier this month.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If a guitar gets fret sprout and you are using a sound hole humidifier, it has got to be very dry in the room or home where you have your guitar(s). The cure for this is a room or whole house humidifier as the sound hole humidifier is just not giving the amount of humidification needed to humidify the whole guitar, including the neck.
 
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IMO if a guitar develops fret sprout,address it at the time with a file and that will be the end of it.
I'm not saying don't humidify but once done it won't come back .
 

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IMO if a guitar develops fret sprout,address it at the time with a file and that will be the end of it.
I'm not saying don't humidify but once done it won't come back .
I tend to agree. However, what if it really bad due to a very dry neck and fretboard? Would filing them down before you humidify cause them to be too short when the fretboard expands? I've never experienced sharp fret ends so this is just something I was wondering about.
 

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NashvilleDeluxe, I see you live in Quebec.

I'm a novice... and if you don't mind, I'd like some advice.
I bought a Martin 000-16GT in July 2017... and just as you described, during the winter, I found it was affected by the dry air in the house, so when not being played, it's kept humidified in it's case and I check it's (in case) humidity gauge, every 2 days.

With advice from my guitar teacher... (for the same reasons you described), this winter I also bought a 000 size Godin Art and Lutherie Legacy, which doesn't need extra care and just sits on a stand. (It's got a great sound for the money.)

I love both guitars... but I'm considering also buying a larger size.

Questions:
1. I was thinking of buying a Seagull Artist Mosaic Element (Mahogany) or a Simon and Patrick - Showcase Mahogany. I like the S&P head stock better, but can't find a salesperson in the greater Montreal region who as deep knowledge of the 2 brands and their differences (apart from the headstock). For some reason stores, which I've visited/phoned, carry only a selection of the lower end models. They tell me there's little demand in Quebec. (They have lots of Taylors, Martins and Gibsons). When I talk with others outside the province, S&P and Seagulls seem to be more available. Maybe it's a case of the pastures are always greener...
Any store/salesperson you would recommend? Or should I be looking for another mid range brand?

2. If I decide to trade/sell my 000-16GT for a larger Martin, is there a store you would recommend... possibly a place which takes consignments?

3. If I were to take out a 2nd mortgage, should I consider a Boucher instead of a Martin?
Home - Guitares Boucher

Thanks in advance, Bill
The Artist Mosiac and Showcase guitars are excellent guitars. There is basically no difference in the Seagull and the S & P except the the headstock, nut width and name. While many prefer the S & P headstock, the Seagull is the better one because of its design with a straight pull to the tuners. Check the nut width on both before you decide; S & P is 1.72 and the Seagull is wider at 1.8".

As for the Martin, I would sell it and then buy another unless you can do a private trade. Think about going used. You can get some fine guitars on the used market for about half the price of new. If you can find any in your area, check out Alvarez, Blueridge and Eastman. They are all fine guitars.
 

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I tend to agree. However, what if it really bad due to a very dry neck and fretboard? Would filing them down before you humidify cause them to be too short when the fretboard expands? I've never experienced sharp fret ends so this is just something I was wondering about.
I doubt it,unless your fretboard was made out of sponge or something.
If it is that extreme,use it for kindling.
It's only going to shrink so much,hopefully the wood was fairly stable before the build,(know what you are buying)
You can always humidify it for a bit and then file.
I haven't had it happen to me either with any new guitar I''ve owned,and I don't know the true history of my used ones.
We're not talking about a whole lot of material removal here,just enough so you can't feel the ends with your fingers.
If it ever came up on one of my guitars,this is one job I wouldn't think twice about doing myself,andI'm no tech.

Just don't do it with a bench grinder.
 

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Fret ends: you bring the guitar up to ideal humidity (a couple of days, ideally), then file. If the fret ends get pokey again, you have a low humidity issue, not a fret issue. My Gibson Goldtop had very sharp fret ends when new, even in ideal humidity. Filed everything, and it's never been a problem since.
 
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