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After being off cigarettes for nearly two years, I fell off the wagon. Of the 'substances' I have tried and used over the years this is the one that always trips me up. Now being a smoker again, I have found my beloved tobacco to be changed with an additive that makes it 'fire safe'. What the hell did they add to do this. The stuff tastes horrible. And it comes off my breath like I've been sniffing glue. Anyone know what has been added.
 

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I can sure relate. Horribly addictive, that nicotine. I smoked for 21 years, long enough for me. Tried the patch, worked for a while although I had weird dreams and didnt sleep well. Got off it, and lasted just under three months. Started sneaking smokes - you know, the garage, honey I've got to run to the store, hey something came up - have to run to work, anything really. I had packs secreted in baggies, placed around a 2 mile circuit which I walked in the evening. Finally felt like such a schmuck I just went thru the withdrawl all over again and joined tae kwon do. Been 6 years now off the bastards.

Don't be too hard on yourself Max; you did it once and you can do it again, when you are ready. Often takes a few tries. Oh yea did i mention I've got way more money to spend on gear now....:banana:
 

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I'm a light smoker. 3-5 cigs per day. Ever since they put that new "fire safe" chemical in there, they taste worse than ever. As soon as my flood ravaged home is restored (hopefully next week) to normal (meaning no concrete floors to walk on!), I'm quitting them, going back to the gym, and going to start eating right.

Tired of the taste, the (minimal) addiction, and needing to lose 20 lbs. Time to get that dialed in, plus play my guitar more.
 

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I hear you Max, I've been on and off for years. Seriously looking at quiting again so a friend of mine recommended a new product called resolve. They do not contain nicotine and you start off by smoking the norm the first week while using ten lozengers a day. Then you subtract 4 cigs every week till your done. There is something in them that curbs the craving. My friend that is using them is having good luck and he is a die hard smoker. It is my next try anyway....
 

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Smoking

I was one of the lucky ones who just got up one day and quit cold turkey.
Of course my father dying two years ago from a combination heart attack/stroke
(he smoked for 40 some odd years) was a large influence.
He was only 62 years old.
Still get the urge once in a while though...........I hope that goes away eventually.
 

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I have not even heard about this "additive". I guess thats another way of making people quit, make it taste awful although I don't know why a tobacco company would do that, of course unless they have been mandated to do so.

I smoked for 34 years, since I was 11. 6 years ago, I decided to quit. I used Zyban to try to get rid of it. The first couple of weeks you are on it, they tell you to keep smoking but make a target date for totally stopping which they recommend to be 2 weeks after you start taking it. During those 2 weeks, the drug made the taste of it awful to the point that you might consider stopping. But it wasn't enough for me to keep me from smoking some more. Then on the 3rd week, I realized I need to make a conscious effort to actually stop it rather than rely on the drug to stop me from continuing on, which I think is what happens to a lot of people.

And so in the end, I ended up doing the cold-turkey thing. So far, outside of a couple stogies here and there, I've been "clean".
 

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Nothing was added to make them tastse terrible; they always tasted like a$$ but once your hooked your addiction "makes" them taste good. Your breath was always bad and you smelled too; you just didn't know it! None

It's been over 6 years smoke free for me. It took a couple of tries to quit. Wait until your really want to quit and then do (a huge difference between wanting to quit and knowing you should).

Good luck, get off em soon

TG
 

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"Warning! Another long Wild Bill rant!"

Speaking only from my own experience, I started smoking a pipe on my 16th birthday, back in the Pleistocene Era. I loved it from the first puff! I enjoyed the flavour and the experience.

Like most true pipe smokers, I never inhaled. Pipe smoking is like cigar smoking. The smoke is so strong by that method that you don't need to inhale.

Many cigarette smokers try switching to a pipe but either out of ignorance or reflex they inhale it like a cigarette and would have been better off still on cigarettes.

Some years later I did get hooked on cigarettes and those I DID inhale, right down to my toe nails! I enjoyed the taste of most of those too, except for some brands that just weren't to my taste.

In trying to quit cigarettes (unlike my pipe cigarettes DID seem to spoil my wind and gave me a "smoker's hack" during my morning shower) I periodically tried to get back on my pipe but never seemed to be able to re-start the habit until about 20 years ago when I got engaged. At the time pipe tobacco was much cheaper than cigarettes and I wanted to save money to get married.

A few years later the kids came and also I became a victim of the bursting of the high tech bubble. My income took a BIG hit and I needed to cut my money overhead again. By this time the government had noticed the price of pipe tobacco and had jacked the taxes up to where pipe smoking too had become an expensive habit. So I quit.

In both cases when I quit I did exactly that, I quit. Cold turkey. No tapering off, no patches or gum, no bumming from friends but just...quit! I haven't had a delicious puff of tobacco in years and yet I've had ZERO cravings.

I've thought a lot as to why I could do it and so many of my friends have had such trouble and have developed some theories. I don't think it's because of a physical addiction but rather more a mental one. You see, although some folks claim that tobacco tastes awful and there's some instantaneous ingredient that instantly addicts you after one small puff that doesn't make sense to me. Many, many people LIKE the taste of tobacco! Many like the taste of straight liquor as well. Giving up a pleasure without a strong enough reason has got to be one of the hardest things in life. Anyone who goes on a diet knows this. Or anyone who's been told by his doctor to essentially don't eat anything he likes anymore (at least, that's what it seemed to me) as well.

It's easy to come up with excuses not to quit when you really don't have sufficient motivation. I truly believe that the anti-smoking movement has hurt their cause by being too shrill and scolding. They often seem to stretch their "science" as they try to "scare" folks into quitting. Over the years they have crossed that line and I believe many smokers took that as an excuse not to listen to them.

They also have triggered almost a sense of defiance among many smokers as they shiver outside with no real shelters. If the goal was simply to protect non-smokers from the dangers of passive smoke it's hard to argue that there's any good reason to give outside smokers pneumonia other than to make it as uncomfortable as possible in the hope of making them quit. This goes against human nature when the smoker is smart enough to see through the tactic and dismisses quite valid warnings as simple arrogance and meanness.

Many people just have too strong an independent streak to meekly just do "what they're told". After all, are you an adult or aren't you? Doesn't being an adult mean having the right to choose such things for yourself?

There's an old joke that goes "If I do what I'm told I'll likely live an extra 5 years but lord knows it'll feel like it!"

And another about how you get any group of Canadians out of your pool. You simply ask "Would you Canadians please leave the pool?"

There are many Canadians that are more independent than that.

No, I think the best key to successful quitting is not more intense harrassment and scolding or more uncomfortable if not downright dangerous smoking areas but rather sufficient motivation. I believe the strongest motivation comes not to spruce up our own health habits but rather to feel responsibility towards our family and other loved ones!

The moment I thought of smoking as taking away from the money needed to support my family it became easy as pie. I simply stopped and have never started or wanted to start again!

Now, all that being said if I win the lottery tomorrow I may indeed dig out my pipe to celebrate... :rolleyes:
 

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Wild Bill said:
Speaking only from my own experience, I started smoking a pipe on my 16th birthday, back in the Pleistocene Era. I loved it from the first puff! I enjoyed the flavour and the experience.

Like most true pipe smokers, I never inhaled. Pipe smoking is like cigar smoking. The smoke is so strong by that method that you don't need to inhale.

Many cigarette smokers try switching to a pipe but either out of ignorance or reflex they inhale it like a cigarette and would have been better off still on cigarettes.

Some years later I did get hooked on cigarettes and those I DID inhale, right down to my toe nails! I enjoyed the taste of most of those too, except for some brands that just weren't to my taste.

In trying to quit cigarettes (unlike my pipe cigarettes DID seem to spoil my wind and gave me a "smoker's hack" during my morning shower) I periodically tried to get back on my pipe but never seemed to be able to re-start the habit until about 20 years ago when I got engaged. At the time pipe tobacco was much cheaper than cigarettes and I wanted to save money to get married.

A few years later the kids came and also I became a victim of the bursting of the high tech bubble. My income took a BIG hit and I needed to cut my money overhead again. By this time the government had noticed the price of pipe tobacco and had jacked the taxes up to where pipe smoking too had become an expensive habit. So I quit.

In both cases when I quit I did exactly that, I quit. Cold turkey. No tapering off, no patches or gum, no bumming from friends but just...quit! I haven't had a delicious puff of tobacco in years and yet I've had ZERO cravings.

I've thought a lot as to why I could do it and so many of my friends have had such trouble and have developed some theories. I don't think it's because of a physical addiction but rather more a mental one. You see, although some folks claim that tobacco tastes awful and there's some instantaneous ingredient that instantly addicts you after one small puff that doesn't make sense to me. Many, many people LIKE the taste of tobacco! Many like the taste of straight liquor as well. Giving up a pleasure without a strong enough reason has got to be one of the hardest things in life. Anyone who goes on a diet knows this. Or anyone who's been told by his doctor to essentially don't eat anything he likes anymore (at least, that's what it seemed to me) as well.

It's easy to come up with excuses not to quit when you really don't have sufficient motivation. I truly believe that the anti-smoking movement has hurt their cause by being too shrill and scolding. They often seem to stretch their "science" as they try to "scare" folks into quitting. Over the years they have crossed that line and I believe many smokers took that as an excuse not to listen to them.

They also have triggered almost a sense of defiance among many smokers as they shiver outside with no real shelters. If the goal was simply to protect non-smokers from the dangers of passive smoke it's hard to argue that there's any good reason to give outside smokers pneumonia other than to make it as uncomfortable as possible in the hope of making them quit. This goes against human nature when the smoker is smart enough to see through the tactic and dismisses quite valid warnings as simple arrogance and meanness.

Many people just have too strong an independent streak to meekly just do "what they're told". After all, are you an adult or aren't you? Doesn't being an adult mean having the right to choose such things for yourself?

There's an old joke that goes "If I do what I'm told I'll likely live an extra 5 years but lord knows it'll feel like it!"

And another about how you get any group of Canadians out of your pool. You simply ask "Would you Canadians please leave the pool?"

There are many Canadians that are more independent than that.

No, I think the best key to successful quitting is not more intense harrassment and scolding or more uncomfortable if not downright dangerous smoking areas but rather sufficient motivation. I believe the strongest motivation comes not to spruce up our own health habits but rather to feel responsibility towards our family and other loved ones!

The moment I thought of smoking as taking away from the money needed to support my family it became easy as pie. I simply stopped and have never started or wanted to start again!

Now, all that being said if I win the lottery tomorrow I may indeed dig out my pipe to celebrate... :rolleyes:
Good to know you were able to quit just like that.
 

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I've been off 'em since my ex-girlfriend's birthday in 2001.

I got fed up with being an addict.

How did I do that? I chained smoked two 25 pax of Player's Light in about 7 hours. I got sicker than a frikkin' dog and spent the next three days sweating nicotine. Everything stank.

And I haven't felt a pang since. And with Calgary's new smoking bylaw in effect, it's a wonderful life as one can sing without some turkey blowing smoke in yer face. I'm going out right now to pick some blues!

Hellll yea
 

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...i smoke approx 2-3 packs per week, enough to worry me.

what worries me more is that i'll quit today and get hit by a bus tomorrow!

why doesn't some enterprising individual come up with a way to smoke without having to inhale all the added toxins?

for example: sell packages of frozen, pure tobacco that you could roll yourself?

-dh
 
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"Now being a smoker again"

You're only a smoker again, if you call yourself a smoker.... Why not call yourself a quitter and keep quitting?

As a smoker, even at my heaviest, a pack of 25 would last me a week or more.... I'd mostly average a hand-full a week, either after gigs, or while I was out with the lads, tossing darts and pints. Now that Windsor is mercifully smoke-free, I was smoking even less. Got a good strong head-cold a few weeks ago, that meant I went probably 2 weeks between smokes... The last one I had tasted horrible, and left me feeling like 5 pounds of home-made, hammered sh!t in a 3 pound bag for a day-and-a-half...

I'm hoping that means I'm done with that nonsense
 
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