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Discussion Starter #1
Why would sliding your hand up and down bare wood be better than a glossy finish? Do people actually have problems with their hands gluing to a glossy neck? I've played in 30+ weather and yeah I sweat but that just makes the whole guitar more slippery.

I've tried sanded or bare necks and they feel like shite to me. Not slick at all. It felt like rubbing fine grit sanding paper. Is this just some temporary craze from a small but vocal group?
 

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I doubt it's a temporary craze as to the best of my knowledge it started in the 1980's. As for why people do it, well I'm one of them and yes, I do find shiny necks sticky when my hand starts to sweat. I don't take the finish right off, just the gloss. I even do it to maple finger boards. Maybe it's different for different people but it works well for me.
 

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It has a long history - especially with upright bass players (goes back before the 80s easily).

Nitro tends to wear down and smooth out over time (my vintage instruments feel great), but poly does not and I do find it sticky. I have sanded my Sonex neck (Gibson so probably Nitro, but I was too impatient to wait for it to smooth out naturally), but then I stained it to match the original colour and re-finished with tung oil; feels so much better and you can't tell without looking very close at the heel and rear of the nut areas (also I bought a spare Sonex neck on ebay before I did that, just in case). Bare wood is a bit like nitro - smooths over time and actually absorbs the oils from your hand. I find bare wood feels pretty good even before being buffed/worn down by playing; possibly it can depend on the level of sanding (how fine a grit did they finish on) as well as wood type and grain orientation.

To me, the worst feel is fresh laquer (no matter whether nitro or poly).

Bare wood in particular is not that popular and unless the neck is multi-ply with opposing grain I would caution people against that due to change-in-humidity-related warping risk. In my experience, sanding the neck (not removing the finish but smoothing it out) or refinishing in oil, are both much more popular options in the last 5-10 years.
 

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I also sand my poly necks to take the shine off. My hand sticks like crazy to the neck if i dont. Lately i have been doing a few outside gigs and use baby powder on top.
 

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I also sand my poly necks to take the shine off. My hand sticks like crazy to the neck if i dont. Lately i have been doing a few outside gigs and use baby powder on top.
I've been tempted to try that but worry about it making my fingers too slippery for bending. What's your experience with regard to that?
 

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I've been tempted to try that but worry about it making my fingers too slippery for bending. What's your experience with regard to that?
It works for me.I have no problem. I do bends all night long during our gigs. Try it out and see if its for you.
 

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I dislike those a good bit more than the modern Fender poly finishes. Dumb:



But a Tru-oil finished roasted neck, sanded back (pores still filled) and burnished is a joy, just like an old well-played mandolin, violin or double bass from previous eras, minus the cooties.

 

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But a Tru-oil finished roasted neck, sanded back (pores still filled) and burnished is a joy, just like an old well-played mandolin, violin or double bass from previous eras, minus the cooties.

That is so my jam right there.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've just seen a lot more videos where people are going nuts sanding their necks. Maybe I've got weird sweat as I slide a lot better on glossy necks. In fact, I have an Ibanez with a matte neck that I'm rubbing with tung oil to give it some sheen.
 

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I've just seen a lot more videos where people are going nuts sanding their necks. Maybe I've got weird sweat as I slide a lot better on glossy necks. In fact, I have an Ibanez with a matte neck that I'm rubbing with tung oil to give it some sheen.
I am definitely not a great player hah, but ya, my sweat actually does inhibit my playing. Sweat drips of my elbows I sweat so much while playing live. That's mostly related to the type of music I play. Casually playing I don't have issues.
 

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I like to occasionally rub the necks on some of my guitars with a green kitchen sponge to just make them feel a little slicker. I also find that some shiny necks feel sticky.
this ^^^

especially poly like what is found on some asian guitars. some of those companies use what feels like the same stuff used on deck furniture. when it gets warm, it's soft and gummy. sometimes when i don't have any weed, my hands sweat just enough to make them stick to necks like that. someone on this board, told me about the green kitchen sponge trick, and it works like a charm.
 

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scotchbrite pads. similar effect to 0000 steel wool or resuperfine (in the thousands) grit sandpaper.
 
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I have mainly played finished necks and my main lately has a satin finish. I like both and my sweat definitely made the finished necks slicker.
 

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For me its the feel and the joy I get from the organic feel of a bare wood neck. My heavy relic has a slight finish left on it but very thin, almost bare wood. My 52 tele has a bare wood back and although the neck it self is a bit slim for my liking the feel of the bare wood is fantastic.
The bigger question I have for the OP is why don't you get that some people like different things than you? If you like thick poly finish or something else then thats the best for you. I do not.
 

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I don't get it either.. But then again.. the neck is not the issue with my playing that slows me down.. its.. my playing.. that is the issue with my playing lol..
I don't play bare wood necks because its faster. I play barewood necks because I love the feel. I can understand this is not for everyone. Most won't like the looks. I stopped worrying about what my guitars looked like long ago as its the tone, feel and playability that matter to me. I do understand that there are many who put the importance of how they're guitar looks equal to how it sounds and if that makes them happy then thats all that matters.

Nocaster Neck

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

52 Neck. I may finish it in Tru oil but haven't decided.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
 
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