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hi, i bought a Korg CA40 tuner and i wonder what is the little 440hz in the upper left of the screen? If i set it higher or lower will i tune higher or lower, like d standard or something like that?
 

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440 Hz is a Standard "A" note
 

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If i set it higher or lower will i tune higher or lower
By way of a little more information, Mk,
Hertz (Hz) is the number of times the vibration of the string moves back and forth when you pick it.
Each note has a number.
The higher the number the higher pitch the note is.

As knight_yyz says "440 Hz is a Standard "A" note"
(2nd fret third string)
A440 is the reference starting point most people use, and the tuner then does the math for you in each direction, high to low for each string.

If you choose to set a number on your tuner higher than 440 to tune your guitar to, your guitar would be "sharp", ie higher than most others.

If you choose a number lower than 440, your guitar would be "flat" ie lower than most others.
 

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North American music is mostly all tuned using 440 Hz as the frequency equivalent of the note A4 played on the 5th fret of the high E string, as pictured below. Whether you play E Standard, D Standard, Drop C or some other combination there of, your A4 note should measure out to 440 Hz. It will just move around on the neck somewhere with alternate tunings. This ties the A4 note found on any string or wind instrument together, making them play well together in a band. For instance. If you played the open A2 string on the guitar, it would emit 110 Hz. On the bass, when you play the open A string, it is called the A1 at 55 Hz because the bass is tuned one whole octave down from the guitar. This sounds good together and forms rock and roll. It really gets into the harmonics of how different instruments complement each other. Even on the guitar itself. If you play a power chord, it sounds fuller than just a single string as the strings multiply together adding harmonics to the signal and thickening the sound. Thus when you are not in tune it sounds dissonant because there are so many different harmonics that are out of tune with each other being created when playing chords.

 

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hi, i bought a Korg CA40 tuner and i wonder what is the little 440hz in the upper left of the screen? If i set it higher or lower will i tune higher or lower, like d standard or something like that?
Do you have a phone? I downloaded Guitar Tuna on my I phone. I always have a tuner on me! It's handy for rehearsal. It's extremely accurate, gives you the HZ per note and you can use this for alternate timings! It's free at the App Store.
 
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