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OK, so I don't own a Strymon anything (just to pick on one). But it occurred to me today, in 10 years will these things appear quaint like an original Line 6 POD, or will they be selling for $5K on Reverb because the Chinese EEPROMS have way better tone than the Lithuanian ones they will use in 2031? Old school analog pedals seem to have a pretty good life expectancy.
 

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OK, so I don't own a Strymon anything (just to pick on one). But it occurred to me today, in 10 years will these things appear quaint like an original Line 6 POD, or will they be selling for $5K on Reverb because the Chinese EEPROMS have way better tone than the Lithuanian ones they will use in 2031? Old school analog pedals seem to have a pretty good life expectancy.
Depends if the popular rappers use them.
 

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Technology and marketing is a funny thing. If companies are able to convince people older technology is better than newer technology (mechanical watches, gas engines, tube amps etc) which often breaks down to analog vs digital, then the additional man hours, "scare" components (how many times have companies found an nos box of diodes in a warehouse?), and overall fussiness of these products carry a higher premium. Factor in Moore's law and consumer habits and you've got yourself the history of digital effects.
 

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They wont be 5k, they will be adjusted based on current prices as they have been the whole time. What does a damage control pedal go for now?
 

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I never understood the sometimes astronomic rise in the value of any vintage electronics - unlike wooden instruments, electronic components tend to get worse as they age. There's usually a cycle where within 5-10 years, the units will be superseded by newer technology and they value will fall to next to nothing, and then after another 20-30 years, collectors and original users will trip over each other trying to find a working unit among a dwindling population and prices rise to ridiculous values (at least, until someone decides to do a re-issue.)

Reminds me of the Boss DM2 Analog Delay pedal. When Boss came out with the Digital DD2, you couldn't give a DM2 away. I got mine for $80 in 1986 and sold it for less than that around 1992. Twenty years later you couldn't find one for less than $300, up until the Waza Craft re-issue. Similar story with the Ibanez Tube Screamer.

Similar story with the ADA MP1. It came out around 1987 for about $900 and was revolutionary for its time. I bought one in 1999 for $100 since I needed seamless MIDI switching between a real tube sound and a clean transistor sound, so it became the cornerstone of my live rig. Out of reliability and availability concerns, I was easily able to find 3 more working backup units for about the same price. Now 20 years later, I see these 30-year old units selling for upwards of $500 US on eBay.
 

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I know a guy who has been buying up all kinds of cheaper ibanez guitars to store away for sale long down the road. He is counting on there not being any wood to make guitars out of so real wood guitars will increase exponentially in value. The problem I see with his hoard is those cheap guitars get backbow and the hollow bodies and acoustics get that sunk in hole and raised up bridge that makes the strings come way off the neck. And because they are cheap guitars it is not feasible to repair them. About 5 years ago I think he had over 40 of them. Oh and I don't think he is keeping them in humidified rooms. I think he actually had a bunch of them piled up in cases in his unheated garage.
 

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Guitars IMO are like most cars, poor investments. I actually wouldn't care what the guitar is made of: plastic, aluminum, corbamite, whatever. Just as long as it sings, it's light and it's comfortable (and doesn't set me back a mortgage).

Some SS electronics do survive though. I recently pulled out a MIJ clock radio I was given as a boy, still works great after all these dacades. But the pedals my brother gave me for nothing when he closed shop are mostly Chinese junk. They sound great but they will not last. I'm hoping that once we get permantently shafted by China on EPROMs, the new circuitry will be made in Korea, Indonesia or even back to Japan again. Japan needs the business badly.
 

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I know a guy who has been buying up all kinds of cheaper ibanez guitars to store away for sale long down the road. He is counting on there not being any wood to make guitars out of so real wood guitars will increase exponentially in value. The problem I see with his hoard is those cheap guitars get backbow and the hollow bodies and acoustics get that sunk in hole and raised up bridge that makes the strings come way off the neck. And because they are cheap guitars it is not feasible to repair them. About 5 years ago I think he had over 40 of them. Oh and I don't think he is keeping them in humidified rooms. I think he actually had a bunch of them piled up in cases in his unheated garage.
I have been collecting jars of air for when the world has no air because of the massive deforestation of Ibanez’s wood supply lol
 

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I know a guy who has been buying up all kinds of cheaper ibanez guitars to store away for sale long down the road. He is counting on there not being any wood to make guitars out of so real wood guitars will increase exponentially in value. The problem I see with his hoard is those cheap guitars get backbow and the hollow bodies and acoustics get that sunk in hole and raised up bridge that makes the strings come way off the neck. And because they are cheap guitars it is not feasible to repair them. About 5 years ago I think he had over 40 of them. Oh and I don't think he is keeping them in humidified rooms. I think he actually had a bunch of them piled up in cases in his unheated garage.
It's not like wood grows on trees or anything...
 

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have been collecting jars of air for when the world has no air because of the massive deforestation of Ibanez’s wood supply lol
Someone already beat you to it. Luckily, Canadian air is some of the most expensive, so you've got that going for you.

 

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Someone already beat you to it. Luckily, Canadian air is some of the most expensive, so you've got that going for you.

Gotta say, 2chainz maintains his gentlemanly Georgia demeanour the entire time.

For a man who became a multimillionaire from making songs about whores and liquor, he didn’t make fun of this guy to his face even once.
 

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I can’t wait to sell an EHX soul food for $5000 in 2097
But the conversion rate on that is about $15!! Like our grandparents buying a house for $25K in the 60's.
 

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People still like and use the Line 6 DL-4. And they’ve somewhat kept their value. Something tells me a Flint will still be 300-400$ in 20 years. There will be collectible digital pedals. Probably not to the ludicrous prices some analog pieces hold but….
 

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I don't think digital pedals will hold their value very well at all. Many digital pedals today can be tweaked with your mobile device or computer, which adds an incredible amount of added functionality, but also adds to their value. However, once the software no longer runs on your device, you can no longer tweak the pedal. A case in point is the Boss Katana v1. The software needed to run Boss's Tone Studio is already obsolete. If you have it great, but it's no longer supported. That's one of the reasons I opted for V2. It too will become obsolete, but a little further down the road.

I had a Source Audio Kingmaker for about a year. It's a digital OD/Distortion/Fuzz. The options are mind-blowing. But I was already running into some glitches in terms of software that I attributed to updates which turned me off, so I sold it.

Now, all that being said, I have come to realize that the pedal that has lasted the longest on my pedalboard is my digital multi-fx, the Zoom G3X with a custom-made controller that SolidGoldFX helped me put together. I use it for modulation, delay, and reverb. The quality of the Zoom G3X is not as good as current digital effects - that is true, but I like how intuitive and analog-pedal-like it is compared to anything on the market today.
 

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Older analog pedals were, and remain, often produced in modest numbers; whether small batches because of pace-of-production limits or because the parts are hard to source. Anything that is mostly digital will require substantial production capacity, if only because itty-bitty parts and double-sided PCBs with plate-thru pads and ultra-thin traces are the sort of thing you get produced by automated wave-soldering, and the folks who will do that for you expect large orders before signing on. Long story short, one can't equate re-sale prices of older analog gear with what current digital gear will go for years later. As well, consider how much sampling rates, bandwidth, resolution, and clock speed for DSP has changed in the last dozen years. Now consider what it will be in 10 years from now.
 

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Reminds me of the Boss DM2 Analog Delay pedal. When Boss came out with the Digital DD2, you couldn't give a DM2 away. I got mine for $80 in 1986 and sold it for less than that around 1992. Twenty years later you couldn't find one for less than $300, up until the Waza Craft re-issue. Similar story with the Ibanez Tube Screamer.
I was surprised how much people were willing to pay for my old mij boss/silver screw pedals.I bought them because they were cheap entry level at the time.
 
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