The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

41 - 59 of 59 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17 Posts
I can't sing at all but watched a bunch of Jeannie Deva's ArtistWorks videos - because I wish I could. She also has a website, you can Youtube her etc. She has/had (passed away) an impressive CV. Anyhow, fascinating stuff. One of the takeaways was that if you are not a natural singer, and maybe feel you can't sing, it's because you don't know how. Her going through the "how" was, to me, kind of amazing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,851 Posts
IIRC, the Neumann U-87 was the second mike on the project.

Apologies......there is no internal filter in my brain that will prevent me from looking for a punchline.

On topic: I watched the 1983 Everly Brothers reunion concert on Prime last night. That was a masterclass in singing. Even their vibrato is in sync.
Yeah the mic was the star of those sessions.

Thanks again for your indulgence in engineering the tracks for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,621 Posts
I'm not a singer but here's a few things I've picked up along the way and recently while watching a few vocal coaches on youtube.

  • Vocal training is heavily influenced by ear training. Sing and learn how to hear the intervals. You can step it up a notch by site singing if you can read music. We had to do that in school back in the day.
  • Recently I learned that it's common to sing flat, so attempt to sing a note sharper than you believe it should be. Might surprise you how much closer you are.
  • Relax. It's natural to tighten up when singing, especially if you're self conscious about it. Same as guitar playing
  • Someone mentioned singing in your vocal range. Find out what that is. There are lots of references to find out where your voice sits
  • Start simple. Don't overextend your chops you don't have. ;)
  • Have confidence

One of the vocal coaches I've been checking out is Ken Tamplin.

Hope this helps. I still can't sing lead for shit IMO, but it never hurts to be a good backup vocalist if necessary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
I can do a pretty good impersonation of Yoko Ono, in a bag with a microphone

have always wanted to take singing lessons to get better though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
One method taught to me many years ago was the Zoltan (Kodaly) method of hand signals (originally Curwen), the same used in the movie "Close Encounters". The way it was taught to me was that after I learned the hand signals, a note was played on the keyboard and I had to acknowledge with the correct hand signal, or a hand signal was shown and I had to sing the correct note. Works amazing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
I am not a great singer, but I took to singing out of spite... that's right, spite. It's a good reason to do anything, including to return a blazer.

I had played guitar for years, but my (now) ex would always criticize if it ever came up. "He can't really play anything" even if I was in a band and we gigged, and I was clearly playing... something.. but in her (pea-sized) brain, if there were no words to recognize and sing/follow/enjoy, it wasn't a song. Did I mention "ex" and "pea-sized brain"?
One day I was working on Norwegian Wood. It's pretty basic through the middle, so I tried to sing, and in my mind, wasn't horrible. I learned others, and so on. One day someone asked me to play, (cue the ex) "tsk, he can't unless you just want to hear nerr-nerr-nerr". I got the guitar and knocked out a handful of songs singing to most of them. I think I threw in Dee by Randy Rhodes just to piss her off. Again, "spite". They were impressed, and she was clearly put in her place. (ya, it was an unhealthy relationship)

I started to find other tunes in my range and listen to other people sing them as well. I found if I could sing most of the song, but not all, someone else may have the same issue, and have may come up with a cool work around, I would use that. Rocketman is a great example.

When I moved back to my small town and connected with an old friend who had always been a great singer. We formed an acoustic duo. He could sing, with a little guitar. I could play, and sing a little. He was a huge help for me. He really could have been a vocal coach... to me he was! The one thing that moved my singing to new levels was singing into a monitor. Hearing my voice come back to me was leaps & bounds learning. I don't need one all the time, but I always use one in practice/gigging situations.

So:
Find your range
Find someone (at least) better than you, if not a full coach
and my biggest one now, is warm up. I can sing (Blue Rodeo's) Bad Timing, but I can't start with it!

Anther one, change the key! If you're doing solo stuff, and move the song from A to G, I doubt the average punter will notice or care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,621 Posts
Anther one, change the key! If you're doing solo stuff, and move the song from A to G, I doubt the average punter will notice or care.
That came up a couple of years ago with a female guitar student. She was also taking vocal lessons from the same studio and one of the first things the vocal coach asked her to do was to use that capo to change the key to her range. You brought up a good example with Norwegian Wood. If you can't quite get it on the 2nd fret capo, try another fret/ key.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,311 Posts
"We are the best band in the world -- correction, correction -- we are the best cover band in the world." -- Me First and the Gimme Gimmes Ruin Johnny's Bar Mitzvah

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #50
I usually tell people to find a good vocal coach. I know some pretty good ones in Ottawa. But the bottom line though is, if someone can't sing, any training whatsoever can't change that. And for those who are lucky enough to be able to sing, like any other thing, practice, practice, practice.
agreed ...
i think we must launch a sound recording app on our computer or smartphone. Then, adjust the audio input settings so that it records a pure, unaltered version of your voice. Practice singing to various songs and recording the outcome.
try Karaoke as well . There are songs out there that fit your vocal range and style.
 

·
Registered
EJ Strat, Ibanez AZ, '62 Thinskin Tele, EBMM Silhouette Special, Carvin Holdsworth HF2
Joined
·
333 Posts
For people starting out, I usually recommend joining a choir. It sort of throws you into the deep end and you improve quickly: sight-singing, breath-support, increased range, harmonizing and a reason to sing regularly. It also helps to build confidence.

The next step is vocal lessons. I don't have a trained voice, but my wife does. Vocal lessons can make a huge difference.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,311 Posts
I had to relearn how to breathe and I'm learning how my mouth position and the various muscles in my face affect the timbre of my voice. I've also had to overcome forty years of bad habits.
Hey thanks. This gave me an idea...

I had scoliosis as a teenager and wore a brace for two or three years, but my spine still leans right a bit and my head is constantly dropping forward. My buddy calls it "slouch-itis". Lol.

A physiotherapist taught me that the best thing for my posture was to draw my head back against a wall while keeping my chin level. I tried this singing today, especially on the low notes where I knew I was going flat, and wow -- it worked. Hopefully as I practise it will become second nature.

Seventy years old maybe too late to become a good singer, but I got nothing else to do this winter. Thanks again for the tip.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,311 Posts
It should. I believe that has a Pitch Correction function. Start by making the correcion subtle and see if you will need more.
I noticed that my wife was not using her VoiceLive so I bought it from her ("half-ers") and hooked it up in the garage. 30% pitch correction did nothing. 66% was too heavy. 50% seems to be what I need at this time.

This VoiceLive Play has a PRACTISE page that displays accumulated data of your singing. So yesterday I was at 87% accurate with an average of -1c off pitch. It also showed which notes were most frequently sharp and which notes were flat. Handy tool with no vocal coach around. My "longest-held" note was an awesome one second!! LOL. Look out American idol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,621 Posts
This might be interesting for a few people. I've been on a major Nightwish kick over the last while and the lead singer, Floor Jansen, has been putting out a few Youtube vids due to Covid and lack of touring because of it. She just started this new Youtube series for people looking to get the vocals going. Note at the beginning she says to go to a vocal instructor.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Hey thanks. This gave me an idea...

A physiotherapist taught me that the best thing for my posture was to draw my head back against a wall while keeping my chin level. I tried this singing today, especially on the low notes where I knew I was going flat, and wow -- it worked. Hopefully as I practise it will become second nature.
I have a source for boutique walls for stage and studio!
 
41 - 59 of 59 Posts
Top