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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone here's using a HPF with a five strings bass?
I'm curious about the use/results.
I've hear about the "magic" of it to tighten up a low B string and wonder if it just snake oil or not.

Thanks
 

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OK so this is not personal experience, as I don't own or play a 5. But you know I have the D-800, with it's built in hpf right around 30Hz.

HELL YES it makes a difference. I play drop D a lot, so not quite the B of a 5er, but even in standard tuning, my SuperBassman can get extremely woofy, as it has no hpf, whereas the D-800 is WAY tighter on the bottom end. And you know over at talkbass, lots of guys buy/use different hpf's - it's not smoke and mirrors, it's very real.

If you have looseness in your bottom (insert beavis here eheh eheh), you will LOVE the results if you add a hpf somewhere in your rig.

Howzit going, eh? Been a month since I jammed as our host is away on vaykay, we have drummers lined up to audition. It's making me crazy.
 

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The main reason to use a rumble filter (a HPF with a rather low cuttoff; don't want to cut too much fundamental) is to give your preamp an ieasuier time and increase headroom. This is especially important with tube preamp sections and basses with neck pickups (or a low B string). Solid state preamps tend not to have as much of a hard time with the low end but it can still be benefitial to de-mud a bit without cutting too much of the meat out of your tone. This is why the Musicman HD130 is such a good bass amp - solid state preamp that will take anything you throw at it, and a proper tube power section; the right way to build a hybrid.

I used to use an MXR KRK 10 band graphic eq pedal and cut the lowest band (30Hz IIRC) all the way when my Gibson EB3 was my main player. Now I have built myself a passive thing to do just the low cut (and a high cuttoff LPF for high end noise).
 
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I half disagree (only half, it has some merit) with that ^, the big advantage is to get rid of the woofy low end that can't really be heard but causes feedback, shit to shake, muddy sound/mix. Makes the low end much tighter, without really having much if anything to do with the preamp.
 

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Anybody know if this would be a good idea for someone like me? My 5'er is a 1991 peavey dyna bass; it has a pretty good B string, not exactly dingwal quality, but reasonably close and 1/7th the price. The bass itself has the same preamp as the Rudy Sarzo signature peavey of the same era, so it's got plenty of versatility with internal dip switches to shift the mid frequencies.

I'm just wondering, will a high pass filter offer me anything that my preamp doesn't? I'm not lacking in high end or mids, but I'd like some more perceived "tightness" to the low B.

My current setup is dynabass ->korg pitch black-> boss LS2 (side A runs an mxr distotion+ fully dimed) side B passes my clean signal. ->the clean signal from B comes into a mid heavy Way Huge Swollen Pickle. And that's all fed into an ampeg micro cl with matching 210 cab.

So, does a hpf sound like it would make sense in my current setup?
 

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a) if you think your tone is a little too bottom heavy, or woofy, then yes

b) it adds a layer of protection for the speakers. They can only handle so much excursion and or power, bottom uses the most power and creates the most excursion. If you're running that setup high volume, it could be useful. That said, that cab has the rep of not producing that much bottom anyways, I'm willing to bet your tone has a lot of low mid as opposed to true bass freq, and if I'm right, probably not necessary.
 

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I half disagree (only half, it has some merit) with that ^, the big advantage is to get rid of the woofy low end that can't really be heard but causes feedback, shit to shake, muddy sound/mix. Makes the low end much tighter, without really having much if anything to do with the preamp.
I agree - the preamp isn't taxed by low frequencies because it is only a voltage gain stage, it isn't supplying any power. It's the power amp stage that gets taxed with more and more low frequency content. That LF requires more power output, from both the power supply and the power output (tubes or transistors, doesn't matter which).

So if an HPF helps, it will more likely be in allowing the power amp / power supply to source current at the frequencies needed and not for those frequencies below that, which is a waste of power/headroom.

I also think, being as it has to be set quite low to not impact the information you want, a simple, passive, single order filter (6dB/octave) won't help much. If set to 20 Hz (it's 3dB knee point, so probably starting to roll off around 30 Hz), it would only be 6 dB down at 13 and 9dB down at 10 Hz. A filter at 12 or 18 dB/octave can be set closer to the desired cutoff frequency and have more affect on getting rid of the undesirable frequencies. But they are more complicated, usually are active and can lead to phase issues - which I wouldn't worry about using a filter like that (you don't care about out of phase if you are trying to lop stuff off anyways).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wow, thanks guyz!
I'll try one in my rig!

I was seriously in doubts about the use of the HPF on a board.

@keto with the logic of the HPF built in your amp I guess I have to put it last in my chain to get more of it?
 

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The ideal place is earliest in the chain (@Ronbeast would do best to put it before the bass ' internal preamp, but that's not usually possible). This can make a huge difference is tone clarity when using modulation FX (most dirt pedals have a bass rolloff built in ; why they make guitar and bass versions of the Boss OD-1 for example). Especially Flangers and Phasers. May also tame Envelope Filters (if yours is triggering weird or inconsistent as regards your dig in'/pick or pluck attack vs what note you happen to be hitting). Definately before a compressor (so as to not have the comp clamp down on sub bass transients; same idea as studio compressors where they have a side chain HPF, but on the input signal directly vs just the signal sent to the peak detection circuit). This will ensure the compressor isn't pumping unless you want it too.

An exception to the above may be some Fuzz boxes where you want that first to interact with the pickup more.
 
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