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When I see these cases of people involved in violent sports, I wonder if being taught to be violent on the field spills over into their private lives.
 

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When I see these cases of people involved in violent sports, I wonder if being taught to be violent on the field spills over into their private lives.
In this particular instance, whatever violent tendencies he had, he brought them with him into sports. Overall, I can't support the notion though. There have been untold thousands of people play very physical sports, the percentage of them killing anyone is extremely low.
 

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In this particular instance, whatever violent tendencies he had, he brought them with him into sports. Overall, I can't support the notion though. There have been untold thousands of people play very physical sports, the percentage of them killing anyone is extremely low.
Perhaps, he did. Remember though, you only knew him as a young man. He was playing football in high school and college before you knew him.
 

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Or rather, if CTE was a significant contributor to his violent behaviour.
Sorry but I don't know what CTE is as I'm weak on acronyms.
 

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As a society, we tend to like people who have impulse-control difficulties. They take chances in public, on stage, in business, on the field, in press conferences, and at political rallies. We tend to think of them as rule-breakers and sometimes innovators. But underneath it all is often a basic difficulty in self-control.

The prisons are full of people for whom 5 seconds (and often less) made the difference between committing a felony, and not doing so. So it should not surprise us that a sports figure in prison for a murder (likely committed on impulse) would act on another impulse and take their own life.

Teach your kids to be patient. That may never make them famous, but it will raise the odds of them having long fulfilling productive lives, and dying long after you, not before you.
 

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As a society, we tend to like people who have impulse-control difficulties. They take chances in public, on stage, in business, on the field, in press conferences, and at political rallies. We tend to think of them as rule-breakers and sometimes innovators. But underneath it all is often a basic difficulty in self-control.

The prisons are full of people for whom 5 seconds (and often less) made the difference between committing a felony, and not doing so. So it should not surprise us that a sports figure in prison for a murder (likely committed on impulse) would act on another impulse and take their own life.

Teach your kids to be patient. That may never make them famous, but it will raise the odds of them having long fulfilling productive lives, and dying long after you, not before you.
How do you teach someone to be patient. Talking Grand Kids here. My kids are grown.
 

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How do you teach someone to be patient. Talking Grand Kids here. My kids are grown.
It's conveyed in a million ways. Saving up for things. Waiting your turn. Cooking rather than microwaving. Waiting in line for things. Taking car trips without e-toys and screens. We tend to forget how many ways each day we encourage impatience.
 

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There are stronger, and weaker, temperament currents to swim against, admittedly. So some folks will have an easier time learning to be patient than others. But patience IS learned (even when not much learning takes place), just as sustained attention is. My own sense is that patience is easier for those whose visceral emotional response is more sluggish and less pronounced. Adults with a history of A.D.D. will tell you they feel emotions more strongly than their non-ADD peers. The visceral sensations of emotion make things seem more attention-worthy; which is why some people can be so easily distracted by anything new, and also why even the most ADD kid can spend hours focussed on a video-game where stuff keeps blowing up. Emotion directs attention, and the lion's share of patience is not feeling the need to be distracted or at least sustaining attention to a single goal.

There's a whole research literature on "delay of reinforcement" and children's willingness to wait for a bigger reward or take the smaller one right now.
 
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