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So about 2 years ago I found a 1965 Guild CE-100D for pretty cheap ($300). That one isn't mine, but it's the exact model and year. Mine just looks beat up but completely intact!



Anyways, it's an amazing clean guitar, but when I use a higher gain pedal, you can barely crank it without massive feedback.

I was wondering what exactly causes the feedback? I tried setting the pickups lower, but that's all I could think of.

This guitar has a killer tone for heavy de-tuned stuff. I just want to be able to turn it loud without it feedbacking.
 

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Nice Guitar man. It has to do with hollowbodies and pickups. Its a common problem. Out of my league but you will get your answer shortly I'm sure.
 

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Hi,

I had a bass that did that. I potted my pickup (that had the coil wound around a U-shaped piece of metal with the magnets on the edges) and it cured it.

Dunno if that would help you

Cheers!
 

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Nice score for $300!

Hollows and some semi hollows can be difficult to keep out of feedback. Try getting away from your amp and try a lot less gain than you would with a solid body.

I've seen guys tape off the F Holes, seen them plugged with foam rubber, etc. I don't know if any of those things work.
 

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It's SUPPOSED to feed back!"

Hollow body guitars were never designed for high volume rock venues. Feedback is inevitable.

What's happening is that the guitar acts like a microphone. The hollow space inside the guitar captures the sound energy from the speaker(s). This makes the strings vibrate and the body shake, coupling the note back into the pickups. Since this is the same note that the strings put into the pickups and then the amp in the first place it's just the same as putting a microphone in front of the PA speakers - instant squealing.

At lower volumes below the feedback point a hollow body guitar has fabulous sustain! It's just that they were never invented/designed for loud rock situations. They're perfect for jazz, vintage blues or country in a small club or in the studio.

That being said, you should watch some video of Ted Nugent. Ted has always used a hollow body guitar. It's amazing how he keeps the feedback under control, using palm muting and other techniques. Most other players can't believe how he manages it but he does a great job! It gives him a tone that is distinctively his own.
It's sorta like juggling chainsaws. Everything's fine as long as you keep control! :eek:

:food-smiley-004:
 

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You can try cotton batting. Use something to stick it through the f holes and pull it back against the grain of the wood. When it catches, just leave it there.

It will slightly alter the tone, but it is reversable. Use as little batting as possible and keep it sparse, you just want to lightly touch the front and back of the guitar with it (you're not making a pillow). You will have to experiment to find out how stuffed you want this thing to be - somewhere between no feedback and a good hollowbody tone.

I usually do this to accoustic guitars that feedback when plugged in.
 
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