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Discussion Starter #1
An interesting quote was made by one of the skilled craftsmen, Arnold Heliski at Heritage Guitars last week.

"He said workers are willing to make changes to improve quality, but insist there's no way to hand-craft guitars without minor flaws."

Firings of craftsmen take heart out of Heritage Guitar, workers say

With today's production methods, it's like PRS management said last year. It's the way to make guitars and it's all bling after that.
 

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I currently have three Heritage guitars, none of which exhibit any flaws, minor or otherwise. In the past I have owned two other Heritages and can say the same thing about them. Maybe I'm just lucky. Are all Heritage guitars completely flawless? Of course not.

I have met Arnie a number of times. He's a skilled luthier (he rolled the necks among other tasks) who, I understand, quit on principle when ten of his coworkers were fired by the new management.
This whole escapade has caused quite a flap on the HOC (HeritageOwnersClub), and rightly so. The fear is that the 'heritage' of Heritage is now gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I currently have three Heritage guitars, none of which exhibit any flaws, minor or otherwise. In the past I have owned two other Heritages and can say the same thing about them. Maybe I'm just lucky. Are all Heritage guitars completely flawless? Of course not.

I have met Arnie a number of times. He's a skilled luthier (he rolled the necks among other tasks) who, I understand, quit on principle when ten of his coworkers were fired by the new management.
This whole escapade has caused quite a flap on the HOC (HeritageOwnersClub), and rightly so. The fear is that the 'heritage' of Heritage is now gone.
I somehow doubt that. I think some feelings got very hurt over some deeply held principles.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There are no flaws, nor mistakes. I like to refer to them at ad lib design features.
And only the craftsman can actually see some of them. I see mistakes I make in my work but very few others have ever noticed. It's the same in all trades, The pro notices the flaws or mistakes because he is the craftsman and knows where to look.

Frankly, that's why CNC machines are better. Craftsman design them so there are no flaws.
 

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Music Man, Kiesel, PRS and many more use CNC machines as part of the production process and make wonderful instruments. IIRC, one of the reasons John Suhr left Fender was because Fender wanted to up production at the Custom Shop but wouldn't give him a CNC machine.

Heck, the Amish use power tools when required for a big job.

That said, I agree advertising something as hand crafted when it isn't is just wrong. Perhaps there is a compromise to be had, such as "Crafted in Kalamazoo" or something like that.
 

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It's probably good to recognize the pros and cons.

If you want a 'perfect' or consistent guitar (or as near as possible), there's going to be a lot of automation involved. If you prefer the handcrafted experience, you will not get perfection. You will get a wonderful personal interpretation of a guitar, as per the builder's experience and handcraft. Each one will be unique, which seems to be the polar opposite of 'perfect' as many people on guitar forums define it.
 
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