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decides to start a make work project today. Pull off cracked bridge on fender CD-140 se, and bought a Simon & Patrick songsmith that had a doozy of a crack, and loose bracing on top due to the crack.

Funny how sometimes, the only way to do a fix or to mcgyver something together. I needed to glue some bracing at far back. It is hard enough trying to get you hand in there, no less work with a light and mirror. I had to get some glue along this one section of bracing, so I decided to to a windex spray bottle hose, jimmy that with some old pens, and heat up some wood glue to it was more liquid like. After a few test runs a sucked up some glue, and went for it. Was very challenging, but got the job done.

I need to add some cleats, but over all working quite well so far
 

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Very creative! I like the idea of heating the glue if that works. I've had great success with artist's palette knives, available at some hobby shops like Michaels. There is usually enough flex in the top that you can work the knife into the crack to both separate it a little, plus work glue in. They also have very tiny squeezy plastic glue containers that I use to refill with my favourite glue to work it in larger separations that are reachable by hand. I've used fat popsicle sticks to trim and wedge inside the body to support the brace while loading the top for some squeeze out pressure.
 

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Thanks:) the glue wanted to skin over so has to work with it fairly quick. I have other tools, but so hard to maneuver in there and see what your doing! Everything was closed. So had to try to come up with some idea to get in there.
 

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On one guitar I worked on, it was a guinea pig so to speak (nothing to lose), I learned how to take the back off. It needed a neck reset and a repair of a depressed fretboard extension too. It was worse than rough.
Back off helps immeasurably to get at all the braces !! :) I cut a 1" particle board desktop piece to fit and clamp inside the body, to a full coverage base, to re-level the top whilst re-gluing he braces. Moisture + some heat helping along the way. The back goes back on pretty easy. Binding (if you have) will need a little care. Then on goes the bridge.
However you feel about risk, proceeding this way is a good experience for learning, and I'd bet you won't throw away your instrument if you're careful and patient.
Warning !! Heat and steam may affect some of the finish on the backside, so an additional work plan for finish will be required. I was fortunate enough that I was able to reuse the same binding ... lol . I did not expect that, but it worked out that way.

I will admit that I have not worked on a back that was not bound, and though I expect removal would be similar - patience , steam, heat, I may be all wrong if hide glue was not used in the process.

If others have removed an unbound back, not hide glue, I welcome your comments.
 
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