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Discussion Starter #1
Godin produces a number of acoustic makes: Seagull, Norman, Art&Lutherie, Simon & Patrick. I really don't understand why Godin would have four different acoustic brands. Did they acquire these companies along the way or does each make fill a different market niche? I haven't been able to discern any huge difference with these four brands of acoustic. They all seem to be affordable, quality guitars. What makes a Seagull different from a Norman/A&L/S&P?

What's Godin's stategy here? Something for everyone?
Just curious.

Cheers,
Al
 

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...as a marketing strategy, it seems counter-productive, to me.

why not build one brand, like fender or gibson? granted, they have spinoffs like squire and epiphone, but still its the fender and gibson names that virtually everyone, even outside the music industry, recognizes.

it probably seemed like a good idea at the time...

-dh
 

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I don't know, but the different brands are different from each other... I find that the Seagulls have the widest, flattest necks and the S&Ps have the thinnest necks. The Normans and A&Ls fall somewhere in between. A&L is more of a beginner/entry level line whereas the S&Ps are more mid level/professional - there's some S&Ps priced around the 1k mark.

Other than that... were they all brands/lines started by Godin or were they purchased by Godin? that could be another reason.
 

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Norman was originally an independent company. When the original owner died I think Godin bought the company from his family. My Norman acoustic is pre Godin.

Yes, they have a million lines but I think Seagull is the flagship, then Norman, then S+P, then A+L. All of them are nice and I wouldn't bother looking anywhere else for the under $500 market.

TG
 

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Norman was the name of Robert Godin's original partner. They built Norman guitars togther.
I guess I was "kind of" right. I didn't know Godin helped start Norman but it seems that Norman was independent for a few years when Godin left to start Seagull.

Thanks for the info
TG
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the link to the article LowWatt. An informative and interesting article. I didn't realize that LaSiDo Inc. was the largest acoustic guitar manufacturer in N. America.

Three cheers for Godin!:smilie_flagge17:

Cheers,
Al
 

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yeah to me it actually makes sense, good way to hit a broader market base - why stay trapped within one brand, especially when that brand isnt necessarily a 'premium' brand?
 

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If and when one of the brands becomes more of a household name (I think Godin already is, but that's me), they'd be smart to simplify it all under one brand with different lines: The Godin Norman line, the Godin A&L line etc...
It's not much different than today but the big deal is the recognizable brand that'd be common.
 

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If and when one of the brands becomes more of a household name (I think Godin already is, but that's me), they'd be smart to simplify it all under one brand with different lines: The Godin Norman line, the Godin A&L line etc...
It's not much different than today but the big deal is the recognizable brand that'd be common.
Totally agree. Keep the sub-brand names as a means of distinguishing them, but use the main brand for everything.
 

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Thanks for the link to the article LowWatt. An informative and interesting article. I didn't realize that LaSiDo Inc. was the largest acoustic guitar manufacturer in N. America.
Three cheers for Godin!:smilie_flagge17:
Cheers,
Al
...i agree! i've met robert godin on several occasions, and he is a class act.

there is a story that he sold the company and, when he discovered that the quality of the instruments was suffering, bought it back.

-dh
 
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