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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The majority of the electric guitars I own I have something in the 0.103 x 0.060 range installed but I’m thinking of trying out something different. In honour of a Gibson Tele build I’m thinking of trying out something lower, 0.106 x 0.037 or 6130 as Warmoth calls them. Besides the obvious difference in the height and probably shorter fret life, does anyone see a downside or problems with the change?
 

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I like taller frets too. Wear is one point to consider, but what's the goal of using the lower frets? Are you looking for easier sliding? It's all preference...if it's just for a change, fine, but if you don't like it, then you're kind of stuck with it.
 

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I have a 2000 R9 which has narrower and taller frets (6105 style I believe, .090" wide and .055" tall) and a more recent R7 that has the Jescar FW45100 fret wire which is wider and lower (.045" tall x .100" wide). Just from a feel perspective, bending strings on the 6105 frets is easier, and the notes "seem" more on pitch. However, the lower & larger FW45100 frets seem to give a more "woody" tone to the fretted notes - but keep in my these are two different guitars, so it really is a qualitative observation.

I honestly couldn't tell which one I prefer, and it's probably why I'm keeping both. I realize I'm not helping much here, but if I were to build myself a guitar I'd probably go with taller frets for their inherently longer life. Also, one always has the possibility to have the taller frets leveled down and crowned to taste afterwards.
 

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Well, I discussed the matter with a luthier last month since I have to consider higher frets on some of my axes (acoustics) since aging brings bigger joints on my fingers and those impair the quality of my barred chords.
He warned me that higher frets would come with higher nut and bridge.
I understand bridge elevation should not be a big issue on most electrics, but what about the nut ?
 
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Well, I discussed the matter with a luthier last month since I have to consider higher frets on some of my axes (acoustics) since aging brings bigger joints on my fingers and those impair the quality of my barred chords.
He warned me that higher frets would come with higher nut and bridge.
I understand bridge elevation should not be a big issue on most electrics, but what about the nut ?
It's relative. The height of the nut needs to be very slightly higher than the first fret. You still press the strings down the same distance.
 

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Tall frets or nothing imo. Go stainless if you do, almost zero wear and are great to bend
I agree with going stainless if its an option. They never wear out and they are extra smooth. That way, you can go to a shorter/smaller fret if you choose to and not have to worry about the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have a 2000 R9 which has narrower and taller frets (6105 style I believe, .090" wide and .055" tall) and a more recent R7 that has the Jescar FW45100 fret wire which is wider and lower (.045" tall x .100" wide). Just from a feel perspective, bending strings on the 6105 frets is easier, and the notes "seem" more on pitch. However, the lower & larger FW45100 frets seem to give a more "woody" tone to the fretted notes - but keep in my these are two different guitars, so it really is a qualitative observation.

I honestly couldn't tell which one I prefer, and it's probably why I'm keeping both. I realize I'm not helping much here, but if I were to build myself a guitar I'd probably go with taller frets for their inherently longer life. Also, one always has the possibility to have the taller frets leveled down and crowned to taste afterwards.
I was going thinking about going for an older Gibson feel since now they use something in the .09 x .06 now but I'm hesitating. I miss the old R8 and frets but it could have been my imagination.
 

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I agree with going stainless if its an option. They never wear out and they are extra smooth. That way, you can go to a shorter/smaller fret if you choose to and not have to worry about the future.
I wasn't thinking about SS but it may be something to consider. I haven't had it on anything else and its been working fine but maybe time to try something new.
 

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After going stainless, I won't use anything else anymore.
 
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my old Fury fireball still has original stainless frets on it and they are perfect. I played the hell out of it for countless years, then my one son noodled on it non stop for 10 years. When he was in high school, he even took it to school with him every day and noodled in the hallways. That guitar never left his hands unless he was sleeping or eating. And there still isn't a mark on those frets.
 

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The drawback with tall frets is that they represent a sharper bend when you fret the strings. For thicker strings, that's moot. But if one happens to like a thinner gauge - e.g., a .009 E, and .011 B - they tend to lose intonation faster because the height of the fret forces the string down behind the fret at a sharper angle.

I say this because I refretted a guitar 40 years ago with tall fat frets. I did it to stiffen what was an otherwise wobbly neck with a thicker fret tang that would push "out" against the two sides of the slot, and improve sustain on what was a very light instrument. The fret change helped with all of that, but was murder on extra-light gauge strings. They'd lose intonation quickly. But again, the greatest impact was on thin unwound strings.
 

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I agree.
Fret height selection should be dependent on string gauge preference .... but also on the hands of the player.
Some players tend to press harder than others.
Blues players, for example, usually sound better if they dig in a bit more, so they usually do.
For those guys, a combination of tall frets and light strings would present an issue that no amount of setup and intonation adjustments could ever fix.
 

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I prefer lower frets bcs I tend to push light strings like 11s out of tune on some open chords if the frets are too tall. Years of playing dreads with mediums for hours on end makes for vice grip hands so electric guitars with 10s are way too light and even 11s with tall frets I gotta be careful. I have two LP Juniors one with low frets and one with higher frets - 11s on both and the difference is noticeable for going out of tune on open chords like A and D.
 

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6125 - feels like a 6105 that’s been dressed - easier to bend vs. vintage frets but not as “railroad tie” feeling.

Danocaster uses these exclusively.
 

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Since we are on this topic already, does anybody know of a competent luthier in the Edmonton area that will do a re-fret on a Strat neck with stainless?
 

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I used to like fooling around with big frets. Theyre fun for making big bends, but terrible for chording and slides.

I play 8-38s, so with tall frets I can likely make a half step bend by simply fretting a note with a tight grip.
 
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