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Discussion Starter #1
Picked up a nice Squier Strat neck cheap yesterday, and it proves to be a perfect match to a "Superstrat" body, acquired from the collection of my late friend Peter. The body is a little pointier than a regular Strat, and has a H-S-H pickup complement, with a master Volume and Tone. I installed two toggles on the pickguard, one of which will be for coil cancelling and the other may be for altering the function of the Tone pot. I expect to do the middle/bridge swap-at-selector that I keep blathering about so I can get neck+bridge with a traditional 5-way switch.

All of that I can manage easily. But what was totally new to me was the Floyd Rose bridge the guitar came with. Fool that I am, I took the back plate off the guitar, looking for where to insert the strings. Surprise!!

So I looked up some Youtubes on how to restring a Floyd. It's complicated. I also found the thickness of the neck heel meant the bridge height needed to be raised. Accustomed to Strat bridges, I looked for ways to raise the saddle, but they don't exist. Hmmm. I learned that one raises the height of the two pivot bolts that the Floyd's knife edge presses against.

I have a string clamp for the nut end of the neck, but installing it seems like a lot of trouble for a guy who won't be expected to divebomb much. At the same time, when changing strings, it would appear that the maximum dive-bomb required to do so jeopardizes the stability of whatever strings are not being replaced at the moment, in the absence of a string clamp.

In any event, any wisdom you can impart about the care and feeding of Floyds and the guitars that use them would be appreciated. One thing I'd like to know from users is where they find it best to clip the end of the string for secure installation.
 

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Not sure what you mean about the nut clamp causing problems with string changes etc. - they're still held by the standard tuners.

When stringing mine I put the strings in backwards, through the standard tuning machines first, with the string ball sticking out the top, changing one string at a time to keep the tension on the bridge springs. Wound strings get clipped before clamping to the bridge if they're not wound all the way. Then they just get tuned up with the normal tuners, excess with balls clipped off, and played for a bit to stretch out. The string trees on the pegboard should have the strings lying flat across the nut clamp so that when they're clamped there, they don't change tune much - the fine tuners should be put somewhere around the middle first before tuning & clamping from the nut end. That's about it. When you want to change strings you just unclamp at the nut, then loosen with the normal machines before unclamping from the bridge, and so on...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. All of this is so new to me that I'm having a bit of difficulty wrapping my head around it, but I will return to read this once I've got the whole thing assembled.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Installing a new set of strings, and it is annoyingly tricky. You line up the end of the string to be centered, and when you tighten up the set screw it nudges the strings off-center when you turn it.

Any secrets to making the string stay put?
 

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Doesn't really matter where you clip the string. I cut them just after the wrap. Some don't cut at all, they thread the ball end through the tuning post.
 

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@AlBDarned nailed the whole process for you. Perfect instructions.

Once you have done it a couple of times, you will be proud of your new knowledge. And skill. Now get in there divebomb the snot outa that thing, that's what it's for!

(Gave mine away. Lol.)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@AlBDarned nailed the whole process for you. Perfect instructions.

Once you have done it a couple of times, you will be proud of your new knowledge. And skill. Now get in there divebomb the snot outa that thing, that's what it's for!

(Gave mine away. Lol.)
The issue is getting the set screw/bolt to press the clipped string end into the block and hold it there. I sat through a bunch of Youtubes and nobody mentions it. Neither did AlB. One would think, from watching the videos, that the clipped string end is just happy to sit there and get pushed into the dimple in the block by the set screw, but it isn't and doesn't.

I'm assuming it's not impossible, but there's gotta be some trick to make it easier than it was for me.
 

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The issue is getting the set screw/bolt to press the clipped string end into the block and hold it there. I sat through a bunch of Youtubes and nobody mentions it. Neither did AlB. One would think, from watching the videos, that the clipped string end is just happy to sit there and get pushed into the dimple in the block by the set screw, but it isn't and doesn't.

I'm assuming it's not impossible, but there's gotta be some trick to make it easier than it was for me.
Is the block there or did it fall out/get reversed? The screw tightens up a removable block against the front of the saddle. The screw doesn't touch the strings themselves.
 

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Re-string 1 at a time as mentioned. If you have to take all the strings off (say you want to polish the frets or anything like that), find something that you can put under the bridge to prop it up.

Also, to tune go from 6th to 1st, then 1st to 6th.
 

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Re-string 1 at a time as mentioned. If you have to take all the strings off (say you want to polish the frets or anything like that), find something that you can put under the bridge to prop it up.

Also, to tune go from 6th to 1st, then 1st to 6th.
I've never bothered with the 1-string-at-a-time philosophy. I use a paint stick wrapped in a cloth to hold the bridge at the approx angle. It's quick and easy this way. Just remember to put some tension on the strings before pulling out the paint stick.
 

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I've never bothered with the 1-string-at-a-time philosophy. I use a paint stick wrapped in a cloth to hold the bridge at the approx angle. It's quick and easy this way. Just remember to put some tension on the strings before pulling out the paint stick.
I generally change them all in 1 go as it lets me clean the guitar properly. I used to have a soft piece of wood that fit in the cavity of a previous guitar. I've got an Ibanez with an Edge trem now and I have bottle caps with a bit of bubble wrap around it.

Either way, OP, if you want to re-string all at a time, you need to prop up the bridge.
 

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One piece of advice I found useful -- one is more likely to break strings near the bridge. The ones most likely to go are the high E and B strings. So, I usually wind some extra windings of string around the tuning pegs for those strings. then, when the string breaks, I just loosen the block, loosen the lock at the nut, and roll some more string out, and clamp it in place. It saves doing larger string changes, when you just want to fix it quick and play.
 
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