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Just wondering how many folks here still actively use locking trems ala Floyd Rose. Seems like every rocker in the 80's had them, but now they're few and far between on production guitars.

I had one in the 80's, but it stayed in the 80's...
 

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I prefer the Kahler Pros. I dont use the bar at all, but I prefer to have a locking trem system. I must have about 25 Floyds, but still the Kahler Pro feels better to me.............
 

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I have a 1989 Lado with a Schaller Floyd Rose. Like Accept2, I don't use the bar on mine either, but the system works really well for keeping the guitar in tune.
 

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yep..still have 2.,...one on the old kramer, and one on a Strat. Still the best, personnaly i always hated the khaler, to clinky and not enough back stech.
 

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Just wondering how many folks here still actively use locking trems ala Floyd Rose. Seems like every rocker in the 80's had them, but now they're few and far between on production guitars.

I had one in the 80's, but it stayed in the 80's...
My number one guitar has one.

There's just no bridge either fixed or trem that comes close to the tuning stability of a properly adjustred FR in my opinion.



 

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I played other people's, and while the bar part was fun, it didn't have much application for my playing.

I prefer a more subtle bar--and that's where the Fender Mustang came in--it's more my style.

Still--there are some guys who were fantastic in how the used the bar--others were just posers.
 

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I was just about to say how my 2 main guitars have original floyds on them, burt then it just hit me that every electric guitar I own (except my 12-string strat) all have locking bridges on them. The thing never wants to go out of tune. I also use a 'tremol-no' on one of my guitars because I play in a lot of alternate tunings.
 

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My two main guitars have them, and I am just finishing a project that will have one as well. Like was previously said, nothing beats a well setup FR. I especially like them since I like to use the bar so much for scoops. Mind you, the next axe I get I want to have a fixed bridge.
 

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now they're few and far between on production guitars.
Not sure where this idea is coming from.

Lots and lots of production guitars come with a Floyd, or a Floyd-licensed bridge.

Check out Jackson, Charvel, ESP, Schecter, Dean, lots of others.

edit - Budda beat me to it.
 

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All high-end Lado guitars are currently Floyd Rose equipped, though these are all hand made custom ordered guitars.

However, as previously mentioned, there are a lot of more affordable Floyd Rose guitars easily found.
 

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...personally, i hate 'em.

just huge overkill, for me.

guys who do extreme whammy stuff make good use of the them, however.

i prefer the non-locking, dual fulcrum (two-point) systems. properly set up and maintained, they are as stable and reliable as any hard-tail.

and some players (david gilmour) get great results using the traiditonal six-screw trem. somehow...

-dh
 

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...personally, i hate 'em.

just huge overkill, for me.

guys who do extreme whammy stuff make good use of the them, however.

i prefer the non-locking, dual fulcrum (two-point) systems. properly set up and maintained, they are as stable and reliable as any hard-tail.

and some players (david gilmour) get great results using the traiditonal six-screw trem. somehow...

-dh

I would agree that a traditional trem, well set up and maintained can be as stable as a hardtail (not as stable as a FR however).

I also agree that DG gets great results from his, however it's inportant to note that DG has a stage side guitar tech tweaking his guitars moment by moment and if one goes out, another is handed to him the second he reaches his hand out for it. Also, he's freaking David Gilmour and consequently he would sound brilliant playing a cigar box with elastic bands for strings!

The FR trems are not only suitable for extreme whammy use. Yes they're great for that, but used tastefully and subtly, they are amazingly smooth and can be quite musical in any genre.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Not sure where this idea is coming from.

Lots and lots of production guitars come with a Floyd, or a Floyd-licensed bridge.

Check out Jackson, Charvel, ESP, Schecter, Dean, lots of others.

edit - Budda beat me to it.
OK, you're right. Not 'few and far between', but still not like the 80's when a Floyd was a must-have for all rockers. Then again, whammy dives and pickslides were musts too, to go with the spandex and big hair. I think it was all Nirvana's fault, Kurt just ruined everything lofu

Still not sure how a Floyd beats a fixed bridge for tuning stability, especially if you solder your strings near the ball end. For it sure beats all other trem systems.
 

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I'm not sure I can agree with that. A well set up genuine FR is about as good as it gets for floating bridge guitars. But it's still floating, and that float is balaced by the string tension on one side, and spring tension on the other.

Springs exhibit a characteristic called hysteresis. Simply put that means if an extension spring is pulled out to a fixed length it will exhibit a measurable force. It we extend that same spring out past that fixed length, and then return to that length, the measured force will be different. Close, but different. Frequently the test protocols for springs will specify how the spring is to be tested so that the manufacturer and customer test the same way.

I think a lot of guys with floating bridges figure out that if their guitar goes out of tune, a quick flick either up or down, (they'll know which they need), will restore the original balance, and therefore return to in tune.

I think the NS Stick (http://www.stick.com/instruments/ns/) is just about the most tuning stable instrument I've ever worked with. It uses double ball end strings, and a fine tuning system similar to a FR, on a fixed bridge. I had one on loan for about 6 months, and tuned it ONCE on the day I brought it into the home. Anyone who knows me knows I'm a tuning/intonation [email protected]$$, and this thing just didn't drift. When it goes out of tune it's more a sign you need new strings than anything else.
As with any machine with moving parts, a certain amount of maintenance is required to keep it functioning at peak performance. This includes changing springs periodically.

I do not need to give my bridges a "quick flip" in either direction to get back to balance. They go back to zero very accurately without such methods.

All technical discussions aside, the reality of playing a well set up and maintained FR is a very convincing experience. Of course one does have to WANT to use them or the little set up and functional tasks will seem like too much trouble.
 

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Most complaints about locking trems are from people who dont do that required maintenace, dont set up their guitars correctly and dont understand how to use their systems. In reality, every bridge system requires some knowhow and gumption to do the necessary things to keep things going properly, even a TOM..........
 

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Most complaints about locking trems are from people who dont do that required maintenace, dont set up their guitars correctly and dont understand how to use their systems. In reality, every bridge system requires some knowhow and gumption to do the necessary things to keep things going properly, even a TOM..........
Very true.

The ironic thing is that it really takes more work and trickery to keep a traditional trem in tune than it does for a FR.

Read threads concerning such trems and you'll see all kinds of tips and tricks traditional trem users employ. The funny thing is, they don't seem to mind doing it for a Fender trem, but for a FR, spending fifteen minutes changing the strings is a big deal.

Oh well.
 
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