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Discussion Starter #1
...finding a guitar tech that is sympathetic to and well-versed in the theory and technology of the floating trem has proven to be a formidable challenge - i have been trying to find someone in the gta for twenty years.

i have a g&l legacy with a floating trem set up.

i believe that this trem is very poorly designed.

i want to find someone who can appraise this trem bridge and offer advice and, hopefully, a cure.

thanks, in advance, for any referrals.

-dh
 

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I know this is the standard answer, but

Replace the plastic nut with a graphtech and install locking tuners. The nut is usually the weak link when it comes to returning to pitch.

From what I understand (I've never owned a G&L) the high strings do not stay in tune - specifically the G string. This may be because while there is sufficent down pressure on the nut during normal playing, that pressure is decreased as the strings are losened (trem down).

I know you don't like sting tees but it may help if the G string is the culprit. To test the theory tie a piece of string around the headstock so that it provides downforce on the D and G strings behind the nut and see if there is a noticable difference in tuning stability.

If your tuning stabalizes add a roller tee, and maybe consider replacing the other with the same. You can use the string trick to find the optimum placement for the tees, if you have the time to play with that sort of thing.

In any case a graphtech nut is not a bad idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I know this is the standard answer, but
Replace the plastic nut with a graphtech and install locking tuners. The nut is usually the weak link when it comes to returning to pitch.
From what I understand (I've never owned a G&L) the high strings do not stay in tune - specifically the G string. This may be because while there is sufficent down pressure on the nut during normal playing, that pressure is decreased as the strings are losened (trem down).
I know you don't like sting tees but it may help if the G string is the culprit. To test the theory tie a piece of string around the headstock so that it provides downforce on the D and G strings behind the nut and see if there is a noticable difference in tuning stability.
If your tuning stabalizes add a roller tee, and maybe consider replacing the other with the same. You can use the string trick to find the optimum placement for the tees, if you have the time to play with that sort of thing.
In any case a graphtech nut is not a bad idea.

...thanks, bro, but all of that stuff has been covered six ways from sunday, and it came with a graph tech nut.

the g&l trem is a unique and, in my opinion, flawed design. i need an expert in the field to either corroborate or refute that opinion, and to help me look for solutions.


-dh
 
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block the trem :)
Bwahhahahaa. That was funny.

The Fret set my PRS trem up to float nicely. Tuning stability is rock solid. Previous owner had it set to rest against the body so you couldn't pull the strings sharp. Now I've got it set to give me about a 1/2 step sharp on the high E string.
 

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Hi David,

Did you ever get this sorted out?

If not here is another suggestion you might try. I have to warn you though, I've been told that this is an incredibly stupid idea, but I've always done it on my own guitars and I swear it helps.

Locking a non-locking whammy bar

Locking whammies (I'm trying to avoid saying trem, so please excuse me if I slip) have a mechanism that stops the string from moving at the sadle when the bar is depressed. If you don't have a locking whammy, the only thing that stops the strings from moving back up into the sustain block is the bend in the string. This does little to stop the string from sliding up the interior of the block as is evident by the stings no going as slack as they do on a locking unit (which is the locking units inherant problem, they pitch down and then go blahhhhhh).

Inside the block, the string block can be tapered, or it may have steps (two different sized holes that create an internal ridge). In some cases there may be burs or other defects inside the hole that 'catch' the string ball end when it slackens and prevents it from returning to pitch. If you have pinging in your bridge and you have ruled out the sadles and pivots, this may be what you are hearing.

Locking a non-locking whammy is easy. plug something in the holes after you install strings to prevent them from going slack. I've used modified accoustic bridge pins, pieces made of wood and even moulded silicone plugs. You just need to be careful that whatever you shove in there can be taken out if you break a string.

Anyone reading this rolling on the floor?


 
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