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The Brian Moore MC1 I picked up recently has a bad case of something called Lacquer Blooming, I've also seen it called blush. Apparently when it was originally sprayed there was moisture present in the air, the result being that over time it takes on a whitish colour and so far I'm having no luck getting it out. Pics attached. I've tried buffing and also heating the lacquer with a hair dryer, all to no avail. Anyone have any experience with this? If I'm looking at a refinish does anyone have any suggestions on who might be willing to do it, Brian Monty perhaps? I'm going to be talking to the guys at Brian Moore Guitars but the cost of shipping back and forth, plus the CITES bullshit worries me.

The whitish/grey areas are what I'm talking about.


 

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Dave, one soliton for getting moisture out of finish is to apply a oily substance and let it sit for a while.

For example, a wood finisher I know was once restoring an antique coffee table. It had some water rings and he was applying mayonnaise to the water spots. The idea is that the oil draws the moisture out of the finish. Granted, the piece was finished with shellac, which is a completely different animal.

Anyway..... this sort of thing is difficult to fix. You may need to try wet sanding and polishing it back out.

Likely won’t need a full re-fin. You will need to cut through the layers where the moisture is - possible you can just sand and buff but new topcoat might need to be sprayed.
 

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There is a "Blush Remover" that you can buy, but basically if it's a nitro finish, then the moisture is trapped below the nitro. The other solution is to spray more clear nitro on the area which will melt the nitro below and let the moisture escape. The blush remover does the same thing but evaporates instead of leaving a new nitro coat on top. One thing to note, I've never been able to source blush remover in Canada. Maybe someone else knows if there is a Canadian supplier. For more info on this check out:

The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum :: View Forum - Guitar Finishing and Restoration
 

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If your worried about Cites just remove the neck and ship the body
 

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There is a "Blush Remover" that you can buy, but basically if it's a nitro finish, then the moisture is trapped below the nitro. The other solution is to spray more clear nitro on the area which will melt the nitro below and let the moisture escape. The blush remover does the same thing but evaporates instead of leaving a new nitro coat on top. One thing to note, I've never been able to source blush remover in Canada. Maybe someone else knows if there is a Canadian supplier. For more info on this check out:

The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum :: View Forum - Guitar Finishing and Restoration
Yes, a blush remover is the type of product if it’s in fact a lacquer finish... but you can easily ruin your finish if you don’t know what you are doing. I wouldn’t recommend your first experience with it be on your guitar.

Sometimes, and depending how deep the moisture is trapped, a light wipe with alcohol can release the moisture. But alcohol is a lacquer solvent do that too can easily disrupt or ruin a finish.

Be prepared for some cure time and work (wet sanding, buffing, polishing) on the finish to return a level gloss after an attempt at blush removal.




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There is a "Blush Remover" that you can buy, but basically if it's a nitro finish, then the moisture is trapped below the nitro. The other solution is to spray more clear nitro on the area which will melt the nitro below and let the moisture escape. The blush remover does the same thing but evaporates instead of leaving a new nitro coat on top. One thing to note, I've never been able to source blush remover in Canada. Maybe someone else knows if there is a Canadian supplier. For more info on this check out:

The Guitar Refinishing and Restoration Forum :: View Forum - Guitar Finishing and Restoration
I believe blush remover will only work if recently sprayed, not on a finish that’s partially or fully cured.

I think you are getting it sanded back and re sprayed.

I’ve never heard if the oil /mayo thing before but just because it worked on shellac does not mean it’ll work with laquer.
They are very different finishes.

The absolute first thing you need to do is identify what kind of laquer it is.
It’s probably acrylic or nitrocellulose.

Nathan
 

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I have no solution to your problem but from your photos I really don't see much blush. Quite frankly it looks amazing. If we ever meet up again I would love to give that guitar a play.
 

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I have no solution to your problem but from your photos I really don't see much blush. Quite frankly it looks amazing. If we ever meet up again I would love to give that guitar a play.
Come on over anytime. Well anytime I'm home of course :)

As for the finish it's not "that" bad but my OCD kicks in every time I look at it. I "know" that it could look soooo much better :)
 

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but my OCD kicks in every time I look at it.
My OCD 'tendencies' have been very bad lately and I think they are getting worse...LOL

If OCD is contagious, we need to remember to sit at opposite ends of the breakfast table when we meet...LOL

I hope you can get this "blush" problem sorted out to the level that will allow you to relax (meant with sincerity) about it.
 

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My OCD 'tendencies' have been very bad lately and I think they are getting worse...LOL

If OCD is contagious, we need to remember to sit at opposite ends of the breakfast table when we meet...LOL

I hope you can get this "blush" problem sorted out to the level that will allow you to relax (meant with sincerity) about it.
Once I get the bit between my teeth I'm relentless to a fault :) The only thing that will likely stop me is if it's going to cost gobs of money.
 

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I believe blush remover will only work if recently sprayed, not on a finish that’s partially or fully cured.
It can be used to remove recent blush on an old/young lacquer finish. For example, steaming a neck off a guitar for a neck reset may cause some blush, and it’s handily removed by a blush remover.

I too wouldn’t expect good results in releasing blush originally entrapped in a cured lacquer finish back when originally sprayed.




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Discussion Starter #14
Well I just got off the phone with Moore guitars and they tell me the finish is Poly, not Nitro. They offer a "bring the guitar back to new" service, which would include a refinish, but the cost would be over $1k US plus shipping. I'm not willing to spend quite that much :)
 

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I'll express skepticism that you'll get any of it out of a poly finish, short of sanding off some. You could try with 400-600 wet sand and see where it gets you, the obvious risk being that you end up thru to the paint.
 

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I'll express skepticism that you'll get any of it out of a poly finish, short of sanding off some. You could try with 400-600 wet sand and see where it gets you, the obvious risk being that you end up thru to the paint.
Looks like I'll be living with it :)
 
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