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That was pretty cool. My uneducated assessment is that I liked the Traynor the most, although it could have used some help with the low end, the high end was crisp and defined. I liked the Orange the least as in many cases it sounded muddy. The Fender, Hiwatt, and Marshall filled out the middle ground and sounded pretty much equal and all good. If I had to choose between those 3 in the middle it would be the Hiwatt. Combining the Traynor and the Hiwatt would be killer.
 

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I liked the Marshall best and the Traynor next even though they sounded completely different from one another. Tests like this are fun but playing live in a band things sound very different. I mostly play rhythm and I like the sound of an Orange Rocker 30 somewhere around half volume. It has just enough distortion to hide my mistakes :) Don’t know why I ever sold it. The closest I’ve come to it is my current Pro Junior just under 3/4 volume.
 

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great test and although there are differences,
I would say that in a band "live" situation and all cranked....you would not be able to tell them apart.
G.
 

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Great demo. I’ll take the Fender.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
G

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Not me....they are still doing exactly what they were designed to do. If they didn't, they would just be a decoration, and a bad one at that.
But running them full volume is like having an old car and going out and driving it with the gas to the floor and not letting up.
 

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But running them full volume is like having an old car and going out and driving it with the gas to the floor and not letting up.
You mean like those thousands of guys I have seen at the track hammering on their 70's and earlier cars down the quarter mile? Or the guys that bring their vintage iron to the road course and drive the living snot out of them? I used to run a machine at one place that used to make shell casings for WW2 howitzers and it still kept going, and if skipped a beat, you got the big hammer, or ram it with the fork lift. The nice thing about older things is that they are built to take it, and can be fixed if they break. Not many proprietary chips in those old amps, everything is still available to get them back going. Pete Traynor used to throw his amps down concrete staircases and off roofs to test how rugged they are. Try that with a Line 6.


Yeah baby, built to kick ass, and keep on kicking!....lol.
 
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You mean like those thousands of guys I have seen at the track hammering on their 70's and earlier cars down the quarter mile? Or the guys that bring their vintage iron to the road course and drive the living snot out of them? I used to run a machine at one place that used to make shell casings for WW2 howitzers and it still kept going, and if skipped a beat, you got the big hammer, or ram it with the fork lift. The nice thing about older things is that they are built to take it, and can be fixed if they break. Not many proprietary chips in those old amps, everything is still available to get them back going. Pete Traynor used to throw his amps down concrete staircases and off roofs to test how rugged they are. Try that with a Line 6.


Yeah baby, built to kick ass, and keep on kicking!....lol.
I don't think vintage car owners are going out and putting them to the floor and not letting up. Track cars blow motors and transmissions.

Anyhow I don't think my PA, stereo, guitar amps and vehicles are designed to run wide open. But that's me. I really look after my stuff though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You mean like those thousands of guys I have seen at the track hammering on their 70's and earlier cars down the quarter mile? Or the guys that bring their vintage iron to the road course and drive the living snot out of them? I used to run a machine at one place that used to make shell casings for WW2 howitzers and it still kept going, and if skipped a beat, you got the big hammer, or ram it with the fork lift. The nice thing about older things is that they are built to take it, and can be fixed if they break. Not many proprietary chips in those old amps, everything is still available to get them back going. Pete Traynor used to throw his amps down concrete staircases and off roofs to test how rugged they are. Try that with a Line 6.


Yeah baby, built to kick ass, and keep on kicking!....lol.
I had a 60's Traynor. It wasn't the best sounding amp in the world, but it was tough.
 
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I had a 60's Traynor. It wasn't the best sounding amp in the world, but it was tough.
I have a '60's Traynor. It's not tough at all. But it sounds really nice. I was going to send it to Fuchs in NY to have it converted to a Dumble clone, but I tried it out before sending and I couldn't do it, it sounded too sweet. But it can't take full volume.
 

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i was really surprised. when i played at the rehearsal factory, i really liked the th50 & 100 they have there. but in this video, the orange they used sounded bad to me. like the o/p/i liked the hiwat best, then the fender. i didn't see that coming at all.
 

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I wasn't happy with the Orange sound at all. Flubby and washed out as hell. Other than that, I liked the Marshall, Fender, HiWatt, Traynor, then if I have to include it, the Orange. I'm not entirely convinced that I heard any of the amps in a great form though. A few of the tonal anomalies I heard that made me wince had a good possibility of being transformed into something sweet with a bit of knob dialing and flavour from the guitarists themselves.
 
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