The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks!
So we've been in Canada for 4 years now, and managed to get away without a car (car sharing), but because of recent changes in our situation (my spouse started a different job), we've bought one, a Hyundai Elantra 2017. We bought it used but with low mileage (22000km), and plenty of time left on the manufacturer's warranty.
Pretty happy with the car, but one thing the salesman told us surprised me: he told us that our next oil change is due after 5-6000km.
I've never owned a car in Canada, but we used to own a car each when we were living back in France. I used to do maintenance on them, and over there the rule for oil changes was 15000km/1 year. Using synthetic 10W40 usually.
The question is: why do we have to do oil changes here so often? Is it related to the quality of the oil?
Cheers,
Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,405 Posts
that is the reason - Synthetic oils do last longer then regular ones (at least that is the talk).
In general in Canada rule of thumb for non synthetic (cheap) oil is 5k.
Considering that price of that is about 30-40$ I was doing it regularly like that on my olds intrigue, and it is still going string albeit old with 260k on odometer.

So you have 2 options.
Continue using regular oil and change it every 5k
or switch to synthetic (you will need your engine "cleaned" to prepare for synthetic) and pay much more for the oil but change less.

Price wise I believe it is about the same.
Quality wise - I also think is about the same.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,729 Posts
I'd read what the manufacturer's warranty calls for and follow that interval, as long as you care about having warranty.

Oil is oil, pretty much. No, it's not lower quality than Europe, it's the same thing if the brand on the can is the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ok I get it now. It's funny, I don't even think you can buy regular oil in Europe anymore (the switch to synthetic happened sometime in the early years 2000). I'll have to look up how much it costs to prepare the engine for synthetic to see if it's worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
The 5K oil change happened because of a few things. Synthetic was not a big thing for the longest time except for car enthusiasts, mostly because it was way more expensive. Regular oil does need to be changed more often, so 5-7K is probably right, but it was also one of things that Canadians got taken advantage of (again) when we switched to metric. 5000 mile oil changed to 5000km and manufacturers, especially the Asian ones, push the 'heavy-duty' maintenance schedule onto consumers if you check the owner's manual. Euro cars are much more reasonable, my Volvo was 12K, Audi 15K and I understand BMW may even be as high as 24K because they all use synthetic. You can run synthetic and easily go to 10K oil changes, which is what I do in my Mazda 3, but you may want to take into consideration any possible issues with warranty with a new car. If you ask the dealership, they will immediately tell you 5K.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,467 Posts
Toyotas have been all synthetic since about 2010. They had some issues with engine sludge with conventional oils in harsh conditions (i.e. Canada), so they went 0W20 synthetic in all of their new vehicles, apparently no issues since. I have synthetic in mine and the recommended change interval is every 12K I think. Switching to synthetic isn't an issue at all, just have a look at the manufacturers recommended synthetic oil and switch it out next oil change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
The big difference about oil change interval between France and Canada, is weather related. Our cars spend ±50% of their lifetime in cold weather. Regular oil being thicker when cold, an engine will suffer more until it's properly warmed up. Same with all lubricated parts on a car.

Do as the maintenance book says, but it doesn't have to be made at the dealership. As long as you keep all your invoices of regular maintenance, dealer will have to honour your warranty if shit happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
Toyotas have been all synthetic since about 2010. They had some issues with engine sludge with conventional oils in harsh conditions (i.e. Canada), so they went 0W20 synthetic in all of their new vehicles, apparently no issues since. I have synthetic in mine and the recommended change interval is every 12K I think. Switching to synthetic isn't an issue at all, just have a look at the manufacturers recommended synthetic oil and switch it out next oil change.
What I use in my 400,000 km 2002 Sienna. It's beginning to burn some though, so I'm wondering if I should go with Penzoil regular oil, which is supposed to contain more paraffin. I've been told it would help with oil consumption.

zdogma is right about not having to have your engine cleaned. Your second synthetic oil change will flush all remains of old oil deposits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
The big difference about oil change interval between France and Canada, is weather related. Our cars spend ±50% of their lifetime in cold weather. Regular oil being thicker when cold, an engine will suffer more until it's properly warmed up. Same with all lubricated parts on a car.

Do as the maintenance book says, but it doesn't have to be made at the dealership. As long as you keep all your invoices of regular maintenance, dealer will have to honour your warranty if shit happens.
It would be interesting to see what is done in places like Sweden, Finland and Norway which have similar cold weather climates. Perhaps with regular dino-oil, but I am still not sure that I believe the cold weather story in modern engines with synthetic.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,317 Posts
You don't have to prepare an engine to take synthetic oil, it all blends. I change my oil every 5000K because I do a lot of short trips, and that's using 100% synthetic. If I was on the highway all the time, I'd probably stretch that to 10,000kms. If someone from Hyundai recommended you change oil every 5 to 6K, there's probably a reason for that. I'd rather error on the side of caution. The more you change your oil, the better chance your engine has of living a long life. Winter temperatures have a lot to do with it. Cold engines wear at a greatly accelerated rate, like 300% to 400% greater while they are warming up. Those wear metals are going somewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,646 Posts
I was wondering if this would be about the first car ever in canada--was there a Mr Lube at that time?

I still check he level & cleanness for oil as well as the oil change places (If you sue them) tend to give you a shorter time, lower mileage than you need
So unless it's under warranty--or you drive a lot & far distances--you might be able to stretch it a bit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,438 Posts
Follow what intervals are shown in the car's manual which has been stated here. It will also show you the recommended oil types and weight. Unless synthetic is specified you'll need to determine whether it is worth the extra expense. Personally, I never found any difference except cost.
Very good idea too to monitor your oil levels between changes provided it has a way to do so. Some cars now have oil level sensors only with no traditional dipstick.
If you are contemplating doing your own oil changes, hopefully you've considered that you need to dispose of the used oil properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,637 Posts
Conventional Oil = Normal crude refined for vehicles
Synthetic Engjne Oil = Conventional Oil that has been chemically altered to run the same in cold temps.

Better for your engine? Absolutly.

You don't have to believe me, Google is your friend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,276 Posts
Climate and how the vehicle is used impacts on how often the oil should be changed.

On my track cars I change the oil for every event whereas my F150, which uses synth, I do about every 5ooo Km. Ford dealer charges less than $50 to do oil and filter plus top up all fluids and check other stuff as well. So, for $50, I ain't crawlin under it and to buy synth and a filter at CT would be around the same as what the dealer charges for an oil change.

I never used dealers before but front pads, new rotors and oil change was about $650 which seemed OK to me. I was gonna do the brakes myself figuring they would charge a shit ton for it but for 650 I ain't putting that bastard up on stands and layin under it for half a day doing brakes and such.

So, frequent oil changes are a good thing to do here and they don't cost much.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top