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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a parallel to, and inspired by, @mhammer 's great thread (and I apologize if I'm stepping on that - not my intention, I hope that one goes on for many, many Pages {pun intended}):

I'm wondering who you didn't get early on but years, maybe decades, later you gave your head a shake and said: "Holy crap, look what I've been missing all these years." I'll start.

Jimi Hendrix - how did I not get him in the 70s. Or 80s. I sure get him now. And I love learning what I can of his. Great player, great showman, he pretty much invented a lot of what I took for granted in the 70s.

George Harrison - I thought the Beatles were a pop band. Then I started learning some of their stuff. The guy was ahead of his time - and way ahead of mine, apparently.

Finally, about a dozen killer country players. From Vince Gill to Brad Paisley (although I did always respect Chet Atkins and Roy Clark, guys I saw on TV). My arrogant rocker / anti-country blinders had me completely miss this group of players. Love 'em now - although I can still say I'm not a hardcore country fan.


You got any?
 

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Gary Clark Jr, John Mayer (for the new blood) & Peter Green.

For the one I went "Wooh!, Really? That's awesome!" It was Billy Gibbons from ZZ-Top.
I just heard "Legs" with that repetitive rhythm tracks, and thought that was all they had.
Wasn't until a few years back that I found the older stuff.
Magic.


Sent from my other brain.
 
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Hendrix - I started getting into music in the late 70's and missed the boat. Prog and heavy rock were the genres du jour.

Johnny Winter / Rick Derringer. Similar as to above. Derringer's "All American Boy" is a great album and discovered it in the last 15 years.

John Goodsall of Brand X - only in the last few years. In the Holdsworth line of playing. Some great stuff. Ollie Halsall is another.

Robben Ford - mostly because my music interests changed.

Allman Bros.

Steve Hackett's solo stuff - in the last few years, probably the guitarist I listen to the most. His Genesis Revisited II album is a desert island for me.

Danny Gatton - incredible player. Music Not largely distributed the main reason.

I'm sure there's more.
 

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Steve Howe. I was never a Yes fan until after their heyday, even after Asia, and in spite of Guitar Player Magazine's constant coverage. The man is a monster player, tasteful, inventive, disciplined.

Robert Fripp. Too clinical, too precise, too mechanical. Then along came the '80s version of King Crimson and something clicked with me.

Derek Trucks is my modern hero, though there wasn't a time when I didn't get him, he just is so much younger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Classical music and then jazz.
When I was younger, I always thought jazz was something I would grow in to. As I matured, you know. It didn't happen. Growing in to jazz, I mean. Well, maybe maturing as well.

@Alex reminded me of another - not surprising as our tastes are very similar. ABB. Didn't like them much when I was a hard rocker but I really get them now. And like Jimi, I really love playing their stuff. I thought we had better hearing when we were younger, but mine seems to be getting better all the time. ;)
 

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I wouldn't know where to start and I find it still happens from time to time.
 

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Steven Wilson solo and with Porcupine Tree
 
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I never really got into the Dead in the sense of figuring out how plays what but some of their fingerpicking is really great. An example being the descending line in 'Friend of the Devil'. I don't fingerpick, so I can't really comment on that bit technically but my ears love it as a catchy song.
 

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I'll go a little sideways and say John Paul Jones. So, been a big Zep fan for years but never really listened to the bass lines much.

Holy moley. I think my favourite is What Is And What Should Never Be, though the whole II is I would say his finest (and busiest) work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'll go a little sideways and say John Paul Jones. So, been a big Zep fan for years but never really listened to the bass lines much.

Holy moley. I think my favourite is What Is And What Should Never Be, though the whole II is I would say his finest (and busiest) work.
Great point. Always like the Beatles, too, but listening now, I hear how amazing Paul was. Just WOW!

As for the Dead? Never did get them. Still don't. Maybe never will. They strike me as a 'you had to be there' kind of band.
 
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