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Discussion Starter #1
ok, here is my problem. i assume i will finally get a good answer seeing i am asking fellow hosers.
my Godin LG sp90 is about 2.5 years old and has always been kept in it's case.
last august we played an outdoor party. we had a tarp covering our playing area, but it was very damp and cool outside (evening) while waiting for our other guitar player to show up i had left my Godin back by the kit to get the strings to settle seeing the temp was changing. when we were getting ready i noticed beads of moisture on the body. i quickly wiped it down and tuned up.
about a month or less after the party i had noticed a cloudy look to the finish on the lower bout of the body and also the rear of the neck heel. it feels abit greasy to the touch. and isn't on the surface. it seems to be in the finish ( satin finish). this isn't nitro, i assume it is a poly based finish.
i have tried drying this out and it has not gone away.
i have no idea if the party weather is responsible, i am assumimg that.
i have also wondered if some stray overspray in the control cavity with pot lube has somehow soaked through to the finish.
any ideas? can it be fixed. it is contained to the edges and not on the top or back.
i have just about given up on this.
sorry guys if i am running off at the mouth..i have just worked a 12 night shift.
 

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Godin must have a website. Could you get their contact info from it and either phone or email them to get your answer? That might be your best bet...
-Mikey
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i have allready tried thier support and they only offered info on a good polish.
it isn't on the surface, it is in the finish.
 

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That's called "blushing" and it occurs when moisture gets into the finish. I don't know for sure if Godin uses nitro. If it was an asian i'd say yes but I also know that their parent company, La Patrie, uses nitro on all their acoustics, Seagull, Art & Luthiery, etc. Perhaps get in touch with them again and ask as to whether the Godin is finished in Nitro. If it isn't ...well give me a day and I'll find an answer for you on how to get rid of it.
 

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It may very well clear on it's own over time. However try rubbing vegetable oil into the affected areas. If it starts to disappJar great. just keep applying it regularly until it is completly gone. If it doesn't make any difference just clean it off.
 

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Blushing

I spray nitrocelluose lacquer on my projects all the time and when I get evidence of blushing I give it a fast shot of straight lacquer thinners, What this does is soften the outer skin of the finish allowing the moisture to release. But you say it is not nitro.
You could still try the lacquer thinner method as it works with other finishes as well. If you do this, spray it on in a light fine mist (if you don't have a spray gun try CTC for a cheap alternative) and do not touch it again till its dry. Give it say an hour. If its working it will make the blush dissappear within that time.
You tried drying it with gentle heat I assume.
Try pressing on a spot with your fingernail to see if that will release it. Sometimes it does.
A note of caution, lacquer thinners, when applied to a urethane finish heavily enough and long enough, will soften the exterior enough to make it orange peel and lift as if it was stripper.
Go to a local body shop and ask them what they use for blush. (Probably the same) A lot of manufacturers use automotive like finishes on their guitars.
Lastly, pretend its a sweat stain from the last time Eric Clapton used it on stage. Tell everybody that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Baba Rumraisin said:
I spray nitrocelluose lacquer on my projects all the time and when I get evidence of blushing I give it a fast shot of straight lacquer thinners, What this does is soften the outer skin of the finish allowing the moisture to release. But you say it is not nitro.
You could still try the lacquer thinner method as it works with other finishes as well. If you do this, spray it on in a light fine mist (if you don't have a spray gun try CTC for a cheap alternative) and do not touch it again till its dry. Give it say an hour. If its working it will make the blush dissappear within that time.
You tried drying it with gentle heat I assume.
Try pressing on a spot with your fingernail to see if that will release it. Sometimes it does.
A note of caution, lacquer thinners, when applied to a urethane finish heavily enough and long enough, will soften the exterior enough to make it orange peel and lift as if it was stripper.
Go to a local body shop and ask them what they use for blush. (Probably the same) A lot of manufacturers use automotive like finishes on their guitars.
Lastly, pretend its a sweat stain from the last time Eric Clapton used it on stage. Tell everybody that.
it seems to be only on the lower edge and at the neck heel.
yeah, i did try using gentle heat and it didn't seem to work.
Eric only wishes he could play my LG:D
 

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guitarzan said:
serious? vegetable oil?
how would that work?
excuse me for sounding a little suprised.
Not exactly sure how it works but I had a similar problem with a dining table(not Lacquer) that I had refinished by a well know refinisher. I called him up in a panic and he told me what I told you. Worked like a charm, takes a little time though.
 
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