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Very cool. Local (to me) builder Joshua House is there I believe.

Maybe the best reason for having the internet is the viewing of guitar shows.
 

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I got there at around 3pm. Lots of interesting guitars there.

I don't have any photos, but I stopped by at Sankey Guitars' booth and there was this strange looking but beautiful headless guitar with a European poplar body. It was so light, I thought the body was chambered, but Michael Sankey told me that it is solid wood. The slanted frets on the fingerboard looked intimidating, but @mhammer encouraged me to give it a try. The angle of the slanted frets did not make it difficult to fret chords at all.

While I was there, I picked up a Southampton Pedals (from Guelph, ON) Ictineo Preamp/EQ for my bass rig. First impression (after 90 minutes of playing) is very positive.

It was a pleasure chatting with @mhammer and [email protected] Bliss Audio. It was an enlightening experience, not just on the circuitry stuff. I also enjoyed chatting with [email protected] Effects (part of the Ottawa pedal mafia) and [email protected] Circuitry.

@Ti-Ron, Mark and I were wondering if you got there earlier than we did. Well, maybe next time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sorry I missed you. The Ottawa tornado slowed my departure from the city. Over 300 intersections had non-functioning traffic lights, so they all turn into 4-way stops, where the lineup of drivers all have to decide "Did I get here first? Is it my turn to proceed?". It made simply getting to the highway painfully slow. The Saturday midday traffic in Montreal didn't help either. I didn't get to the show until around 1:00. Too bad our paths didn't cross. As noted by Boogieman, we did have a very pleasant afternoon and chatted at much length. I was pleased to be able to introduce Anthony/Boogieman to the "brains" behind the pedals.

Two things about the show stood out for me:

1) Fanned frets are now no longer an oddball thing, but have pretty well gone mainstream. Maybe more mainstream than 12-string guitars.
2) Rosettes and fret-markers are now where acoustic luthiers express their creativity. Lots and lots of utterly gorgeous, and surprisingly asymmetrical rosettes and fascinating fret-markers.

I took a wad of pics and will have to curate them first - including rotating them upright - before posting, to show you what I mean. I have begun converting Joel Korte to the CFL. He has vowed to take me to a CFL game next time he's out this way. I missed seeing the Redblacks conquer the Eskimos yesterday, and unfortunately cable TV is still down from the tornado, so my wife couldn't PVR it.

We all went up St. Laurent, and finished the evening with big bowls of pho. The drive back was fine, but with big swathes of Ottawa still without power, it was creepy driving through town with pitch black on either side of the highway and only headlights to illuminate (no overhead streetlights). I still have no idea how our neighbourhood managed to retain power, while neighbourhoods on either side of us have none.
 

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Nice venue, friendly folks.
Checked out the new trem from Millimetric,
the really light and funky hollowbody from Schorr,
the super light and equally funky headless from Sankey,
the cool pedals from Ground Control,
nice cables from Redbeard (cool demo too),
amps from DeRoy (sadly only through DI),
nice light and bright guitar from Dagleish,
and I picked up a new fuzz from Southampton.
It was a GREAT way to spend an afternoon.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The fellow from Redbeard introduced me to G & H plugs and jacks. The phone plugs are a thing of beauty, and he tells me cost about the same as Switchcraft. Solidly built.

Mike Sankey's guitars are always things of beauty as well. He's one of the few builders who opts for Lace Alumi-tones as a stock pickup.

Did our paths cross there? If so, where? If not, a pity.
 

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My friend and I got a little tutorial about the ZOIA from the fine folk at Empress. My head still hurts...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
It's an absolutely brilliant pedal. I expect that it will be way too deep for many. When I was at NAMM, I had a long chat with Christoph Kemper about finding the right balance between flexibility and usability, and we both agreed that sometimes, you have to leave a few options out in order to foster usability. The Zoia leans heavily towards flexibility. That's not a sin, but it means Empress will have the burden of providing the sort of documentation and demo videos that will foster usability. They're up to the task, I feel. They just have to DO it. Your tutorial was from the developer, Steve Bragg, who has spent about 2-1/2 years with it so far. And though you'd think that breeds the sort of expertise to make it do wonderful tricks, it's often the last thing you want from someone providing instruction to a beginner. Good instruction often comes from someone who is certainly away from the start-line, but can still see it and point to it. When they're miles down the road from the starting point and can't even point to its general direction, that makes it harder to anticipate the learner's needs.
 

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It's an absolutely brilliant pedal. I expect that it will be way too deep for many. When I was at NAMM, I had a long chat with Christoph Kemper about finding the right balance between flexibility and usability, and we both agreed that sometimes, you have to leave a few options out in order to foster usability. The Zoia leans heavily towards flexibility. That's not a sin, but it means Empress will have the burden of providing the sort of documentation and demo videos that will foster usability. They're up to the task, I feel. They just have to DO it. Your tutorial was from the developer, Steve Bragg, who has spent about 2-1/2 years with it so far. And though you'd think that breeds the sort of expertise to make it do wonderful tricks, it's often the last thing you want from someone providing instruction to a beginner. Good instruction often comes from someone who is certainly away from the start-line, but can still see it and point to it. When they're miles down the road from the starting point and can't even point to its general direction, that makes it harder to anticipate the learner's needs.
Really not a bad pedal idea. In facts, it is really nice to people thinking outside the box. But, it is like learning a new language, at least for me.
Maybe eurorack and synths guyz will be more able to get the full potential out of it.
 
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