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i figured that the guitar you play , if it has it's own line of strings , maybe it's a good idea to use them, does this make any difference (you know how some guitars snap certain types of strings likle rice krispees?)...just wondering is there an advantage to using fender strings on a fender?...or is just personal experience...actually i know that answer...i guess my question is , do the companies sell their strings in this manner , "a fender should have fender strings"...etc....and what do you all think?
 

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the bullett ends of fender strings were designed to stay in tune better than normal ended strings when used with the tremolo (which they do). that is a very specific case though, manufacturers usually just say "best used with our brand of strings" because they are money grubbing. martin (and some other acoustic strings) have silk wound on the end of them with keeps your bridge from getting as wrecked
 

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sorry, forgot to add, if a guitar is breaking strings regularly, there is a problem with the player or the guitar (usually saddle)
 

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Guitar strings, like guitars themselves are a matter of personal preference. In fact, the similarities between string brands/types vastly outweight the differences. With the exception of boutique string makers like John Pearse, most guitar strings come out of three or four factories that manufacter strings for many different brands.

Fender Bullets are a unique marketing concept, but I doubt that they offer a measurable performance improvement over conventional ended strings.

My preference for Fender guitars are Elixer Nano Web (electric), .10.'s They last a good long time and have a nice warm, punchy tone. In conventional strings, my next choice is usually GHS Boomers or D'Adario's, both of which come out of the GHS factory, I believe.

You should experiment with different brands, but always stick with the gauge set that was used in the last setup of your guitar. Sometimes you can go one gauge higher or lower without affecting intonation and neck relief, but sticking with the same gauge set is a better choice.

With the exception of the coated strings, I don't find much difference from brand to brand, especially once they have worn in a bit.

Jeff
 
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