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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm looking to possibly throw on some new saddles on an existing bridge plate and I though it would be fun to try some of the old school looking stamped ones. I've never used or had this style on any of my guitars. Do these come in different grades and would some be better than others?
 

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I prefer the look of the older stamped saddles. I don't think they came in different grades but I'm sure some members with far more experience than I will chime in with their thoughts and experiences.
 

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you can get steel, or brass or stainless to affect your tone.
 

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Would you have to go to Fender to get them? I think that would be available in many places, are they not?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just want to know if the saddles differ in quality from the Squier, MIM and American line of guitars?
 

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I'm tempted to try this with my Gretsch. You can get billet steel, aluminum and brass bridges for it, and I'd like to try one in place of the TOM. Not sure which one, and at the price, I'm not likely to get the whole collection.

With Fender, I'm more of a traditionalist. I like Tele's with 3 brass saddles (although they can be oriented for intonation - so 3rd party, not necessarily Fender). And I like the traditional bent steel Strat saddles. My reasoning is that these are the configurations that the reputations of those iconic guitars were built on, so it's good enough for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I had a chance to compare a MIM Cabronita and MIM '72 Thinline, both have the shorty bridge with the 6 stamped saddles. The quality of the Cab saddles were of much lower than the Thinline. It was just some roughly finished bent steel vs somewhat better looking smooth Fender stamped saddles. I guess that answers a bit of my question but I'll hit the showroom floor and compare a few different models like Squier vs American.

Regarding different metals for bridges, I think I'm about to try mixing aluminum for E-A with brass on a traditional tele bridge and listen for the difference.
 

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I could be wrong, but I think you need to make sure you get the right width so that the saddles all correctly fit on your bridge. I don't remember which way it goes, but some older "vintage correct" saddles had narrower/wider spacing, I believe.
 

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Yup, vintage/narrow.
Do some measuring, Vadsy, before you spend.
Also need to note the intonation screw location.
They're not all the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did read that the vintage was different but it seems that these days Fender only seems to have one line of the stamped saddles, I could be wrong though. The ones I found on the Cabronita were not Fender and frankly pretty awful.
I stopped in at L&M yesterday and whether it was the American Strats or Squier '72 Thinline they all appeared to be the same stamped saddles. The guys behind the counter concluded since Fender only offers one listing for accessories on their website of these saddles there must only be one style offered. They could be wrong as well.
I found some used and as long as they don't scratch up my picking hand while playing they'll be ok.
 

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As far as scratching your hand goes, you should be able to find alternate saddle height screw lengths to custom tailor your bridge for smoothness.

Overdrive Set Screws
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I just trim and round of the bottom of the screw if they give me any trouble. Obviously though if possible I like to avoid doing that and hope they all work out from the start.
 

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Do you angle your saddle heights?
I mean longitudinally down the saddle.
I don't make my saddles level to the plate.
Each of the two screws will be adjusted ever so slightly different.
I make the saddle tops conform to the contour of the board radius so it's a smooth arc from E to E rather than a step up, then down.
The centre groove where the string rides will be where it needs to be but one side is a hair higher/lower.
I find that improves the smoothness I feel with my right hand.
It works especially well with block saddles and I've never had any issues arising from it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Do you angle your saddle heights?
I mean longitudinally down the saddle.
I don't make my saddles level to the plate.
Each of the two screws will be adjusted ever so slightly different.
I make the saddle tops conform to the contour of the board radius so it's a smooth arc from E to E rather than a step up, then down.
The centre groove where the string rides will be where it needs to be but one side is a hair higher/lower.
I find that improves the smoothness I feel with my right hand.
It works especially well with block saddles and I've never had any issues arising from it.
I do the exact same thing as you with setting up the guitar the times I do it myself and I just took note from the guy who does most of my setups. It does often leave the top adjustment screw sticking out a little, especially on the traditional 3 saddle bridges but some are better than others and most things can be easily tweaked.
 
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