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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy,

I would like to get some input, opinion, experience etc.

I've been thinking to replace the Stock Fender Transformers in my Deluxe reverb reissue 65' (output, power, choke and reverb driver).

The all mighty question will it make a noticeable improvement tone wise ?

From what I read on the internet, big builders such as Fender tend to cut corners (quality) on some parts in order to make profit.

If I was to be torn between replacing tubes or transformers what would be your advice ?

Am I wasting time and money thinking about replacing the transformers ?

Thanks for your time and help

Cheers
 

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This is one of those things that could be discussed forever......but, I would think the output transformer and the speaker would have have the most affect (effect?) on tone. Everything before them is dealing strictly with electricity & electrons. Those are the two components that convert that electricity to sound.
A lot of people replace the entire circuit board on those amps with old style, hand wired, boards and carbon resistors. Are they gaining anything? I honestly don't know.
 

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I've said this before, from a strictly resale value standpoint, it is not worth it. It may even devalue the amp and you certainly cannot expect any return on investment here. It's a modern amp, so this may not be too much of a concern - seeking better tone may trump all, but only you can decide that. If it is still under warrenty (I am not a Fender guy, not sure when those came out), this will invalidate that so think about that too (It may be a matter of just waiting a few months). Iron is expensive and there isn't too much demand for the original iron (by itself, not attached to the rest of the amp - in terms of selling it to mitigate the new parts' cost) and the improvement, which is subjective, is not, IMHO, worth that cost (certainly not the choke and reverb driver; OT would be the most value followed by PT and after that I wouldn't even think about it, personally, unless there was a fault or broken part).

Going further, a complete rebuild as @Lincoln mentions, that may have some market value, but it is no longer a 65 reissue, but rather something else entirely. There may be a market for that (I suspect so) but very nichey and cautious. Still I would wager you're not getting all your money back if you do this; don't do it for the resale, (if you do it) do it because it's cheaper than an actual 65 and it's your forever amp and you want it to be all it can be bugger the cost (assuming still less than an actual 65 - careful there, it could get close).

Carbon comps do sound a bit different (crunchier, dirtier - but it is cummulative - you need the whole signal path to be full of them to even notice the difference) but they are also a liability (failure and value tolerance/drift over time). Metal films are not as sexy but they are more robust, reliable, accurate and stable. I have used them myself and I don't think I will bother inn the future, especailly now that they actually cost more. Stay the F away from paper in oil caps - not worth it. Audio voodoo with a particular penchant for making a mess of the entire board because they (the vintage ones at least) are not sealed and they do not affect tone assuming same value as a modern quality cap.
 

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Replacing the speaker will make the biggest difference, far above any of the others. The output transformer will make a difference as well, subtle but noticeable. When replacing the output transformer and wanting to hear the difference, an upgrade might be in order as far as size goes, increasing the bandwidth. The type of steel and lamination pattern come into play as well, many options to research, a rabbit hole for sure. The only company that offers many variations for specific amplifiers is MM, but you might not want to open your wallet that far. Replacing tubes may not be dramatically noticeable. Best of luck.
 

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What WCGill said, but I would not waste the extra $$ on MM. I'd look at others (e.g.,Heyboer, Hammond, Thordarson) as they are also quality items. Just pay close attention to the specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks guys for your replies it's appreciated :D


@DavidP I'm actually looking for and Hammond since I'm in Canada and from what I read they make a pretty reliable product. MM is pretty awesome as well.
If I were to be located in USA MM would be my first choice.
 

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For me, the increase in sound quality will not make up for the increase in cost, differences will not be dramatic. And it's not like you can offset much of the cost by selling the old parts, you won't recoup much of your money.
Agree with the others that speaker changes will give you the biggest bang for the buck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I’m currently running and Eminence Canabis Rex (12”- 8ohm)

This weekend I’ll try to replace it with a G1265 that I already have at home to see if it’s a game changer.

I got the amp used about a month ago for a fairly good deal. I’m pretty sure the amp is still running the same stock tubes (2004-2006)

I did recheck the bias to make sure the amp had a good setup.

But I guessing that the tube are pretty much dead by now.

I’ll eventually try swapping out tubes to see the effect on tone, in hope of improving the reverb’s tone and overall character of the amp.

Other than that I would say the Deluxe reverb is a Great amp and take pedal pretty well.

As for replacement part a Hammond OT run for about 50$ CND so it’s not too step ... but we’re not there yet :p
 

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I will agree with speaker.
I have a drri and changed the Jensen to a Weber.
It's great for me because the speaker is lower efficiency and breaks up sooner at lower volumes, so I can get more of the sound I want at a volume I can use at home.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hey guys, heres a few updates :

I've replaced the Eminence C. Rex with a Celestion G12-65.

There a Drastic change in Tone !

The amp is way more dynamic and touch responsive compared to the C. Rex.

The speaker feels like its louder, even though the sensitivity says otherwise.


I did try to swap tubes around :

- Removing V1 to get sooner break-up in Vibrato Channel.
- Replacement V5 with a 12AT7 to smooth out the reverb.
- Replace the V6 Phase inverter to a 12AX7.

None of these changes seemed to lean toward any good results, the amp even started to sounds weird and some microphonics stuff happened.
I did put the tubes back to their logical spot.

Next step will be new tube, I really enjoy the Deluxe reverb, it's a great amp, take pedals like a Champ, the Clean tones are just what you would expect from a Great Classic American amp.

Expensive Boutique amps aren't always the answer !

Cheers
 

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A Deluxe Reverb is an industry standard, whether it is hand wired or a reissue. It generally is all anyone should need as a known reliable amp.

Expensive boutique amps may or may not be to your liking as an at home, or bedroom amp. However, boutique amps may cut noticeably different or better at band volumes in a mix. As they should when that kind of money is spent.

From what I have experienced, reissue amps, are good as is, exactly how a company like Fender sends them out the door; perhaps a speaker change is needed for one reason or another. Original tubes that came from Fender do an admirable, repeatable job.
 

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I've never replaced a transformer, but I will offer the experience I've had with tube swapping.............

I bought a new Traynor YCV20WR several years ago, and after the initial honeymoon period, never really liked the sound. Spent about $100 on a set of higher quality tubes (it came with Sovteks), Electro-Harmonix, if I remember correctly. That made a night-and-day difference for the better. Not enough difference for me to want to keep the amp, though, and it eventually got traded (for a bass, of all things).

Second amp: a Trinity Tramp I built from a kit. This is a two-tube amp that takes one 12AX7 and one octal power tube, a 6V6 or 6L6 or EL34 or KT66, etc. The kit came with a JJ 12AX7 and a JJ 6V6. Sort of middle of the road quality tubes, I think, and the sound was sort of middle of the road too. So, after following several 'what-tubes-should-I-use' threads on the Trinity forum, I upgraded to a Winged-C 6L6 and a Tung-Sol 12AX7. Good lord, that amp came ALIVE. It has the sweetest sound imaginable. Just after the swap I loaned it to my instructor for a week and he didn't want to give it back. Those tubes have been in the amp for more than five years now, and it still sounds amazing. Best money I've ever spent on my signal chain.

So my advice would be to put your money into a better speaker and better tubes.

 
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