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Do you have any favourite books for working on sight reading?

I've had O'Neil's 1001 Jigs, Reels, and Hornpipes for years, but in the last few months I've been really using it, especially since there's so much music in it.

Any other recommendations?
 

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Agreed, The Fiddler's Fakebook is great. Daily Ukulele. Daily Ukulele Leap Year. Dailty Ukulele Baritone. The New Real Book. The Ultimate Fakebook. The Real Little Best Fake Book Ever. The Real Little Ultimate Fakebook. The Real Little Classical Fakebook.
 

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Music reading for guitar - The complete method
by David Oakes

Plenty of exercises on classic short pieces to master the topic.
 

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Your suggestion of O'Neil's Music Of Ireland is a good one. I like Mooh's suggestion of The Fiddler's Fake Book too. I have a bunch of fiddle tune collections and I never seem to tire of just running through them. I've added a bunch of unfamiliar tunes to my repertoire this way as well.
I also have a couple of books from Hal Leonard that were written for flute called Great Jazz Duets with tunes ike Star Dust, Blue Skies, When Sunny Gets Blue.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Your suggestion of O'Neil's Music Of Ireland is a good one. I like Mooh's suggestion of The Fiddler's Fake Book too. I have a bunch of fiddle tune collections and I never seem to tire of just running through them. I've added a bunch of unfamiliar tunes to my repertoire this way as well.
I also have a couple of books from Hal Leonard that were written for flute called Great Jazz Duets with tunes ike Star Dust, Blue Skies, When Sunny Gets Blue.
Some fiddle tunes can be quite easy, while some can be very challenging.
 

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butterknucket,
To begin with, the following information is only my opinion and therefore, you will need to weigh-out the pros and cons accordingly.

I see three main areas of studying scored music, 1) theory, 2) sight reading, and 3) sight playing. The first two could be performed as purely rote exercises, but the third, would require the use of the instrument - obviously.

Sight reading, at least to me, involves the use of new material only, and therefore is really a one-time endeavor. Once a piece has been read, it should no longer be considered as new material but is in fact, a rehearsed piece.

So, for sight reading, anything that contains a written score could be used. If the score contains "transposed" material, then ensure that you know how to ready such material first.

More importantly however, try to determine what your "goals and objectives" are for sight reading, and try to be as specific as you possible can.

I hope that you find this information helpful?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
butterknucket,
To begin with, the following information is only my opinion and therefore, you will need to weigh-out the pros and cons accordingly.

I see three main areas of studying scored music, 1) theory, 2) sight reading, and 3) sight playing. The first two could be performed as purely rote exercises, but the third, would require the use of the instrument - obviously.

Sight reading, at least to me, involves the use of new material only, and therefore is really a one-time endeavor. Once a piece has been read, it should no longer be considered as new material but is in fact, a rehearsed piece.

So, for sight reading, anything that contains a written score could be used. If the score contains "transposed" material, then ensure that you know how to ready such material first.

More importantly however, try to determine what your "goals and objectives" are for sight reading, and try to be as specific as you possible can.

I hope that you find this information helpful?
I just meant books with lots of challenging music, but thanks for your input.
 

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butterknucket,
I just meant books with lots of challenging music, but thanks for your input.
...Then consider Chopin, the ballad's, or Schumann and Rodrigo - just to name a few.

If you are looking at pieces to perform for the guitar, then consider Sor, Giuliani, Dowland, and the Bach Lute Suites.
 
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