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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to add one to my pedal board, I have tried a Strymon Lex but found that it had a volume drop that I didn't like, great pedal but. The hughes and kettner roto sphere, another great pedal but takes up way to much real estate on a pedal board. I have phase and flangers but they aren't the same. Seeing that these leslie pedals are pricey and every demo on Utube claims this is the best one yet I'm reaching out to others. Anyone have a favorite?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The secondary function on the Preamp Drive knob is a +/- 6 db boost/cut, so that could address that problem.
I believe it was on of the first ones, I'm not sure if that was an option then. I'm guessing that they have updated the pedal.
 

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I use an original Neo Ventilator with my Nord Keyboard, I think it's a great sim. They do make a Mini Vent that is more pedal board friendly, and it has a guitar/keyboard switch. But as you say, they are pricey.
 
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I have a few, sort of. I have a Line 6 Roto Machine, a rotary speaker program on my Line 6 M5, a rotary speaker emulation on my Lexicon MPX-100, a rotary simulation on my Donner Alchemy multi-modulation pedal, and a Pearl PH-044 6-stage phaser with ramp-up/ramp-down speed switching, that tries to sub for a Leslie. I'm fortunate in having a Vibratone cab - extracted from a console organ - to compare against.

The Roto Machine is the best of the lot, for me. The thing I like about it is that it provides variable drive. Given that a true Leslie comes after a tube amplifier, part of its sonic signature is the additional harmonic content contributed by a driven tube amp. The thing I don't like about the pedal is that you can't adjust the volume to compensate for higher drive settings. Behringer made a less costly (and MUCH lighter!) clone of the Roto Machine for a while.

The thing about ALL Leslie emulators is that you really need to try them out in stereo. In mono, they basically sound like a "better" chorus, with ramping. In stereo - if done right - you get the spatial swirl of the real thing, which is about 60% of its charm. And, to be clear, I'm not talking about the "stereo" you find on a JC-120 amp or on many chorus pedals that have dry and wet outputs. I'm talking about stereo that "moves" back and forth across the channels to mimic the repositioning of the rotor and sound source location.
 

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You will note that a number of those shown in the comparison are mono only.
I went down the stereo rabbit hole and found it pretty ineffective and in some ways counterproductive.

Unless you're the sound man sitting in an optimum position, stereo is almost useless in a live application.

Just my opinion of course, but I went to considerable lengths and expense in coming to that conclusion.

The only time stereo makes sense to me is when wearing headphones or sitting in that perfect spot in your listening room.
 

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I went down the stereo rabbit hole and found it pretty ineffective and in some ways counterproductive.

Unless you're the sound man sitting in an optimum position, stereo is almost useless in a live application.

Just my opinion of course, but I went to considerable lengths and expense in coming to that conclusion.

The only time stereo makes sense to me is when wearing headphones or sitting in that perfect spot in your listening room.
Fair comment. I suppose I should qualify my advice and note that the spatial swirl is really more pertinent to slow speeds. The fast bubbly speeds don't really allow for that much of a stereo advantage. Stereo will certainly make fast speeds sound fuller, but they sound pretty full in mono, too. Slow speeds, however, become magical and mesmerizing in stereo.

And whatever Greg Koch is using sounds pretty damn fine. Mind you, he tends to make everything sound fine.
 

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Fair comment. I suppose I should qualify my advice and note that the spatial swirl is really more pertinent to slow speeds. The fast bubbly speeds don't really allow for that much of a stereo advantage. Stereo will certainly make fast speeds sound fuller, but they sound pretty full in mono, too. Slow speeds, however, become magical and mesmerizing in stereo.

And whatever Greg Koch is using sounds pretty damn fine. Mind you, he tends to make everything sound fine.

I think if you're sitting in a small room with the two amps the stereo impact is huge, dramatic, all that, much as sitting in a room with a Leslie can be.
 

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I think most of us can appreciate the magic of a Leslie and the quest for a portable pedal based simulator may go on for some time to come.

I had an Option 5 which I liked but I suppose there are more advanced pedals now.

For me, one of the most important elements is the transition between slow and fast rotors.

If that is done skillfully (in terms of the design of the pedal) I think you're half way there.
 
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