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Discussion Starter #1
Two Canadians have seats this year, Lance Stroll (BWT - Force India) and Nicholas Latifi (Williams).

Also, a new street circuit in Hanoi. I hope it's not another night race.
 
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That netflix is supposed to be good. Hope to see it some time.
Stroll has been less than impressive for me in his first 3 seasons. This year with the car accused of being a Merc clone, maybe he'll have a chance to show something. (P.S. Force India is now Racing Point)

Bahrain race to be run with no spectators due to corona virus. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Aaaaaaand ------------------- Australia's cancelled.

I agree, less than impressed with Stroll. Lots of daddy's money forgives a lot of little driving errors. I don't know anything about Latifi except he was runner-up in F2. I've lost a lot of interest in F1 since they power that be, the FIA, moved it from a series about technology to a series about drivers. It's never been the same since, IMO.
 

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I've lost a lot of interest in F1 since they power that be, the FIA, moved it from a series about technology to a series about drivers. It's never been the same since, IMO.
Could you please explain this in brief. Please remember that all I know abut F1 is from the NETFLIX series. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Could you please explain this in brief. Please remember that all I know abut F1 is from the NETFLIX series. Thanks.
Sure.

Years ago, the series was pretty opened, technology-wise. The rules were less restricted - make a car that fits in this box, weighs no less than this, and has this big of an engine. Everything else was mostly wide opened. In the 3 litre era (until about 1980-ish), you could build what you want - V8, V12, W16 - whatever you thought was going to work. 5 speeds, 6, 7? Whatever. Fuel and tire development was wide opened. Very little restrictions, technically, just rougher guidelines. It really was an engineer or designer series that pushed the envelope year after year.

Then we went through the turbo era, which basically made the unboosted 3 litre engines noncompetitive. BMW's qualify 1.5 litre engine produced a guesstimated 1400 HP. Technology went crazy with the advent of variable valve timing, sequential gearboxes, active suspension (no springs, only hydraulic dampers and sensors) - I think it was the almighty FW14B/08 that Williams built in 1992 that was the straw that broke the camel's back. It could go around a track, using early GPS, with the suspension and transmission shift points preprogrammed. A very capable car that just about didn't need the driver.

The car that rewrote F1’s record and rule books: Nig | Hemmings Daily


The cars were incredible technical works of art. But the cars won the races, while the drivers had little impact on the ultimate outcome. If you weren't in a Williams (or McLaren or Ferrari or Renault, depending on the year), you weren't going to win a race, let alone a WDC. The FIA used this, as well as reduced and eventually eliminated tobacco sponsorship, to affect a significant change over the next decade.

Engines that in a previous season were spinning up to 22,000 RPM were rev-limited to 16,000 or so. In the new hybrid/turbo era, boost valves were handed out by the FIA so no one could find an advantage there. Draconian penalties now, if you can't get an engine, oooops sorry, the TKU or whatever they call the hybrid lump now, to last half the season. Force the teams to race on two different tires, although one is definitely inferior to the other. Lots of wrenches thrown into the logical engineer's world.

Over time, they've tried to reduce the car difference due to advancing technology and tried to make the driver (and team strategy?) a larger factor. Not quite IROC or NASCAR, but along those lines. And it's worked somewhat. No one can believe the FIA's viewership numbers as they are self-serving, so no one really knows if viewership has gone up or down significantly, but it is still very popular and growing in markets that it previously didn't. And people seem to relate more to Lewis-v-Sebastian (famous drivers) than Newey-v-Byrne (famous engineers).

So I can't say whether it was the right direction or the wrong direction for the sport, but I know I didn't miss a race (or qualification session) in the 80s and 90s, and don't even see every race now. I used to wake up at 5:30 to watch races live and now it might be 4 days before I watch one. I just finished watching the last race of 2019 Tuesday night, as the WDC and WCC were already decided. I was prepping for the Australian race this weekend, now gone. I usually really enjoy the first race of the season because it is still a significant barometer of what the rest of the season will look like. And I guess I can now consider myself a COVID-19 prepper? Damn!
 

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@High/Deaf Thank you VERY much!

Your post was extremely helpful and much more detailed than I had expected.

I am about to read the link you posted.

Take Good Care!
 

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I lost interest when I bought a race car and started racing myself. It took me a few years but I eventually realized that the team with the most money always came out on top. I lost interest in racing as a participant and as a spectator. The rules don't really matter. Money always wins in the end.
 

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I was a fan of F1 for about 10 years and then about 5 years I slowly started losing interest. For the first time I don't even know who won last year. Oh well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sure, big money is a problem. In all sports. The baseball team with the most money wins. Same with football, soccer, I could go on.

But I preferred when the money was concentrated on the team, engineer and technology and not on the 'nut holding onto the steering wheel'. They've tried leveling the playing field wrt budgets but it never seems to work. Hell, Ferrari is still racing on Marlboro money, something that was made illegal 20 years ago. Just a new company (Mission Winnow) owned by the tobacco firm with a logo that looks suspiciously familiar.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yea, I saw that, too.

Ferrari, from northern Italy, missed a chance to 'beat Merc' here. Be nice to see some red ones for Italy, some yellow ones for France (Renault), some blue ones for Austria (that will give us wings) and some white ones for Japan (Honda).

But being F1, if they aren't giving them away, no one will be able to afford them.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Spec series are basically the only way to make racing somewhat competitive.
............ for drivers.

Not much competition for engineers or designers in a spec series, though. It depends on where you want your competition from.
 
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Most informed summary!

Sure.

Years ago, the series was pretty opened, technology-wise. The rules were less restricted - make a car that fits in this box, weighs no less than this, and has this big of an engine. Everything else was mostly wide opened. In the 3 litre era (until about 1980-ish), you could build what you want - V8, V12, W16 - whatever you thought was going to work. 5 speeds, 6, 7? Whatever. Fuel and tire development was wide opened. Very little restrictions, technically, just rougher guidelines. It really was an engineer or designer series that pushed the envelope year after year.

Then we went through the turbo era, which basically made the unboosted 3 litre engines noncompetitive. BMW's qualify 1.5 litre engine produced a guesstimated 1400 HP. Technology went crazy with the advent of variable valve timing, sequential gearboxes, active suspension (no springs, only hydraulic dampers and sensors) - I think it was the almighty FW14B/08 that Williams built in 1992 that was the straw that broke the camel's back. It could go around a track, using early GPS, with the suspension and transmission shift points preprogrammed. A very capable car that just about didn't need the driver.

The car that rewrote F1’s record and rule books: Nig | Hemmings Daily


The cars were incredible technical works of art. But the cars won the races, while the drivers had little impact on the ultimate outcome. If you weren't in a Williams (or McLaren or Ferrari or Renault, depending on the year), you weren't going to win a race, let alone a WDC. The FIA used this, as well as reduced and eventually eliminated tobacco sponsorship, to affect a significant change over the next decade.

Engines that in a previous season were spinning up to 22,000 RPM were rev-limited to 16,000 or so. In the new hybrid/turbo era, boost valves were handed out by the FIA so no one could find an advantage there. Draconian penalties now, if you can't get an engine, oooops sorry, the TKU or whatever they call the hybrid lump now, to last half the season. Force the teams to race on two different tires, although one is definitely inferior to the other. Lots of wrenches thrown into the logical engineer's world.

Over time, they've tried to reduce the car difference due to advancing technology and tried to make the driver (and team strategy?) a larger factor. Not quite IROC or NASCAR, but along those lines. And it's worked somewhat. No one can believe the FIA's viewership numbers as they are self-serving, so no one really knows if viewership has gone up or down significantly, but it is still very popular and growing in markets that it previously didn't. And people seem to relate more to Lewis-v-Sebastian (famous drivers) than Newey-v-Byrne (famous engineers).

So I can't say whether it was the right direction or the wrong direction for the sport, but I know I didn't miss a race (or qualification session) in the 80s and 90s, and don't even see every race now. I used to wake up at 5:30 to watch races live and now it might be 4 days before I watch one. I just finished watching the last race of 2019 Tuesday night, as the WDC and WCC were already decided. I was prepping for the Australian race this weekend, now gone. I usually really enjoy the first race of the season because it is still a significant barometer of what the rest of the season will look like. And I guess I can now consider myself a COVID-19 prepper? Damn!
 
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Discussion Starter #17
When you said Merc I figured Damn, now Ford has something to do....when I read it I saw it meant 'cedes.
You'd have to go back to the might Cosworth DFV to relate Ford to F1. That was 4 decades ago.

They did fund the Jaguar team for a few years - they owned the marque and felt that it needed the prestige marketing more than Ford itself.

Supposedly, at some board meeting in Dearborn, Henry Ford IV (or V or VI - some level of grandson) saw the name Eddie Irvine on the list of Ford employees and, as the second highest paid employee in the whole company, had to ask who he was. Jag's lead driver made more from Ford than everyone but the guy with his name on the front of the building and Jr didn't even know who he was.


A steering wheel from a few years ago. Last I heard these things run in the 30,000 pound range (most factories are in the UK).

F1_wheel.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I was thhhhhisssssss close to canceling my sports channels. Then I heard this and decided to tough it out for one more month. I seriously haven't looked at the sports block of channels in 3 months now.
 
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