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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I play mostly acoustic gigs these days, so I'm plugged into a PA. I have a little K&K box that I plug my 12, mando, resonator, and (or) banjitar into before the PA channel. It gives me lots of wiggle room for mid's etc. My main 6 string goes into its own channel, with (or without) my pedal board.

For practicing at home, I'd like an acoustic amp type set-up. It would rare I'd gig with it, so why would I spend hundreds on an actual acoustic amp?? I've seen vids on You-Tube where players are showing acoustics through amps designed for electrics, and they all say "Look, this sounds great, you don't need an acoustic amp." But they don't sound great!!!

Has anyone here done this?? What effects do you use to "pure up" the sound?? Is there a mode you can do, or change the speaker, bypass something??

I have my Fender Hot Rod Deluxe, but for mods, I also have an old Aris amp that has been sitting unused for at least 10yrs, and a Peavey "Audition- 110" I bought from a buddy. I have no idea why. I hated that thing when he bought it new in the 90's, but for some reason I bought it off him 5-6yrs ago.

Any help would be great. Again, this would not be for gigs, just home use.

... unless it's GREAT!!! then I might take it out.

Thanks.
 

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Fishman loudbox or loudbox mini.

Electric amps feedback too much, and for some reason most acoustic amps have the regular speaker plus a tweeter. The tweeter seems to make the difference
 

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I think you can get good acoustic tones out of an electric amp. I’m a tube guy myself. I play my Alvarez mmy1 through a vox ac4tv (with the 10” speaker) on a clean setting. I’m sure an FBJ or any 1x12 fender with more clean head room (and on the brighter side) will sound great. I highly recommend installing a good (LR Baggs) pickup in the acoustic and using a feedback buster. I’ve not been impressed by any stock electronics in an acoustic, and I’ve heard them all.
I’ve used that ac4 for mandolin too and it sounded pretty good.


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Acoustic guitar pickups, if the guitar doesn't have a built in preamp (and especially those with piezo pickups), are usually high impedance and require a high impedance input to load them correctly (higher than most electric guitar amps provide). If you don't have a high impedance input, those piezos in particular can sound bright and quacky.

I have a couple of Hi-Z inputs on my console that tame a contact pickup directly, but when I go out, I take my Para DI with me, which interfaces the hi-Z pickup to a balanced lower-Z PA input. It also has some powerful EQ controls, feedback busting and an effects loop, for more flexibility.

Unlike electric guitars, acoustics sound better with a flat reproduction system (the same as a voice does). Electric guitar amps are usually too middy. That's why you see the two way speaker in acoustic guitar amps. And the suggestions of keyboard amps, bass amps (at least those with an HF device) or PA/monitor speakers is a preference over an electric guitar amp.

It appears guitar amp manufacturers are starting to get this, with the appearance of acoustic 'profiles' in amps like the Katana, somewhat compensating for the natural tendency of the speaker and box to be overly middy.
 

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Yeah I’m comparing a stock pickup in a Gibson j45 vs the lr baggs. the baggs is noticeable better. Through the same Di. I would even say that I’ve never been that impressed with any stock pickup through a para di or other active di, and I would invest first in the pickup. Then spring for the di.
Newer Gibson’s and Taylor’s which cost upwards of $1600, just have really poor pickup systems imo. And a baggs isn’t that expansive. I think it’s the best bang for your buck if you gig with an acoustic. And through either a PA or guitar amp, you will get better sound from your acoustic.


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Electric amps just don’t have the frequency response. You need the tweeter for the highs which are practically nonexistent on electric guitar amps.

Considering how cheap a used Fishman Loudbox Mini can be had, and how light and convenient it is, it really seems the best way to go for me. I use mine for jazz guitar as well, and have had good success using a Boss GT-1 with it for electric tones.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the suggestions. It would seem I really do need an acoustic amp. So much so I went and test-drove some yesterday. I liked a few of them, but the Fishman Loudbox Mini is "The One". I'll keep my eye out for a used one. In the meantime.... I have come up with a unique way to monitor my practices without spending a dime.

Long ago my very first digital recording set up was a free copy of Cubase my friend gave me (it was a throw in with a high end ZOOM recorder) I used that, a Behringer interface, and a 6 channel Peavey board (PV8). The Behringer quit (surprise surprise) and I got a new computer and updated everything. The PV8 went into storage.
So, I can plug my electric/acoustic into a channel, a vocal mic into another, and use my studio headphones to listen. It's small, and can be set-up full time in a small corner of my music room. I can even output to my ZOOM if I want to record it. Good thing is the board has Phantom Power so I can use my K&K DI to find a good mix for the guitars, (I can even use a pedal board). There are no effects so everything is "pure" which is totally what I was looking for!

It is a stop gap to getting an acoustic amp though.
 
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