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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently have a Les Paul Junior copy that is probably in need of an upgraded tuning keys. I have had some issues with re-tuning, so, through the process of elimination, I'm going to start with the tuning keys and hopefully do not have to venture down to the tailpiece.
I prefer high ration keys as its more precise.
This is an inexpensive LP Jr copy so the price needs to be reasonable.......

Any suggestions???

Shutterfly
 
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The gear ratio of the tuners is important. Especially if they have lesser quality gearing with backlash or slop. 18:1 is nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
[
tHE TUNING KEYS ON THE lpjRQUOTE="BGood, post: 1780793, member: 13735"]Look at all the proposed solutions up here. You'll realize that your process of elimination is reversed. Tuners are the last thing to upgrade in tuning troubleshooting.[/QUOTE]
Before you buy --- what are the issues you're having? Are the tuners slipping?
yeah, slipping seems to be the issue. I will tune the guitar and within minutes sometimes before I complete all the strings it slips out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
[QUOTE
"BGood, post: 1780793, member: 13735"]Look at all the proposed solutions up here. You'll realize that your process of elimination is reversed. Tuners are the last thing to upgrade in tuning troubleshooting.[/QUOTE]

suggesting the bridge/tailpiece
 

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[
tHE TUNING KEYS ON THE lpjRQUOTE="BGood, post: 1780793, member: 13735"]Look at all the proposed solutions up here. You'll realize that your process of elimination is reversed. Tuners are the last thing to upgrade in tuning troubleshooting.

yeah, slipping seems to be the issue. I will tune the guitar and within minutes sometimes before I complete all the strings it slips out![/QUOTE]

That's actually quite common and may not have anything to do with slippage. As you add strings and tighten them to pitch, each string adds to the tension on the neck, adding relief and making the tuning on the previous strings a little flat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
yeah, slipping seems to be the issue. I will tune the guitar and within minutes sometimes before I complete all the strings it slips out!
That's actually quite common and may not have anything to do with slippage. As you add strings and tighten them to pitch, each string adds to the tension on the neck, adding relief and making the tuning on the previous strings a little flat.[/QUOTE]

I must confess fiddling around with the truss rod always makes me nervous however this guitar is my cheap beater and would be willing to give it try. I also must inform I have never been able to determine if a neck is straight or bowed must be something wrong with me as I often watch players stare down the neck and discern appropriate adjustment. A skill I definitely need to work on...haha
So, can you guide me on the truss rod adjustment??
 

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I didn't say you needed to adjust the truss. You misunderstood me. Perhaps it was my ham fisted way of explaining.

If the truss rod adjustment is constant, as each string is added and tuned, that string pulls, adding relief, effectively shortening the distance between the nut and the bridge, lowering the tension and the pitch of the previous strings.

Add a string and rough tune. Once all strings are added, retune. Stretch strings, retune. Repeat until the strings don't need to be retuned after you try to stretch them.

Personally, when I restring, I add tension by pulling on the string while I'm winding it for the first time. I find that the artificial tension helps pinch the string where it goes through the hole and makes for tighter winds on the tuner resulting in less slippage once tuned up.
 
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