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Yeah, got it used and it's pretty much new. Wasn't looking but this came along at a good price.

I like it, it's got some real fat ass tone and loud as hell for 5 watts.
 

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But! If Nige had one of those, you know it would go to 13. And crush Stonehenges with a single splat.
 
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As I understood it, the thing with "going to 11" was originally inspired by tweed amps going to 12. For a variety of reasons, including their design, but also the fact that the pickups coming into style at the point when tweed amps were starting to have cachet were much hotter than what tweeds had originally been designed for, resulted in great overdrive tone. So amps that "went to 12" were considered desirable. I bought my tweed Princeton that "goes to 12", and has great overdrive tone, in 1976. We certainly didn't talk about "12" being anything magical at that time, but we knew that tweed amps were special. My first "real" amp was a 1973 Peavey Classic, that was covered in fake tweed.

But why did older amps "go to 12"? My understanding - and I will happily be corrected by more authoritative information - was that legending of rotary controls had a tradition of being guided by military and nautical descriptors, which were, in turn, analog-clock inspired. So, setting something to 12:00 meant straight ahead, and 6:00 was directly behind you. We still talk about control-settings in that way, but the legending on chassis more closely corresponded to that. When I lived in Victoria, Capitol Iron Hardware carried a lot of surplus marine gear, from CFB Esquimault and other places, and a lot of it had controls that "went to 12".

I guess as audio gear started to become more commonplace, the legending, and chit-chat about controls became more 10-based than clock-based, and 1-10 became more the norm.

All of that said, a) Sweet little amp, there, Wardo, and b) I'd be curious to hear about any historical info on when and why Fender decided to switch over from 12 to 10.
 

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But why did older amps "go to 12"? My understanding - and I will happily be corrected by more authoritative information - was that legending of rotary controls had a tradition of being guided by military and nautical descriptors, which were, in turn, analog-clock inspired. So, setting something to 12:00 meant straight ahead, and 6:00 was directly behind you. We still talk about control-settings in that way, but the legending on chassis more closely corresponded to that. When I lived in Victoria, Capitol Iron Hardware carried a lot of surplus marine gear, from CFB Esquimault and other places, and a lot of it had controls that "went to 12".
So I guess we've come full-circle. Now it seems more common to refer to amp settings as they would appear on the fact of a clock, rather than their actual pointer settings (since those can vary, i.e. the tweeds above). So it's more common to say "I set my treble to 1:00" rather than "I set my treble at 6 - or would that be 7 on a tweed amp"? Mesa even refers to o'clock settings in their manuals, it has become to common.
 

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That was followed by amps going to infinity...
 
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