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Discussion Starter #1
i have an image i want to draw on the back of a light jacket. how can i do it so that it wont disappear or fade when i wash it? when i used a sharpie on a jean jacket ages ago, everything bled one day, when i got caught in the rain.
 

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Michaels, and similar crafts shops, do sell fabric pens that leave a sort of rubbery paint trace that won't easily wash away, although the usual advice to people with stuff printed onto t-shirts and such is to be careful in the washing. Mind you, I doubt any sort of jacket is going to get thrown in the wash weekly, so less of a risk than a t-shirt one sweats into.

When you go to Michaels ask specifically for fabric pens. There are also "paint pens". I've used them for legending pedals. Fairly hardy.
 

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Michaels, and similar crafts shops, do sell fabric pens that leave a sort of rubbery paint trace that won't easily wash away, although the usual advice to people with stuff printed onto t-shirts and such is to be careful in the washing. Mind you, I doubt any sort of jacket is going to get thrown in the wash weekly, so less of a risk than a t-shirt one sweats into.

When you go to Michaels ask specifically for fabric pens. There are also "paint pens". I've used them for legending pedals. Fairly hardy.
yup this ^
My better half used to do hand painted t-shirts,the paints she used were permanently set with a hot iron after they had dried for a day.
Some material won't hold the ink/paint as well as others,so check for that.
Cotton works well,poly not so much.
They will be able to tell you at the craft shop what type would be best for whatever your jacket is made of.
 

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sort of... i was thinking of putting this on there:

That's kind of a complicated thing to draw. You might be better off buying some of those iron-on sheets for t-shirts. It'll obviously need a colour printer (oops, color printer). I don't mean to underestimate your drawing skills, bro. It's just a big challenge to draw that freehand on a jacket. A stretched canvas on a frame, maybe, but unless you have a way of holding a jacket very steady, nailing the symmetry will be tricky. Just my 2 cents.
 

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That's kind of a complicated thing to draw. You might be better off buying some of those iron-on sheets for t-shirts. It'll obviously need a colour printer (oops, color printer). I don't mean to underestimate your drawing skills, bro. It's just a big challenge to draw that freehand on a jacket. A stretched canvas on a frame, maybe, but unless you have a way of holding a jacket very steady, nailing the symmetry will be tricky. Just my 2 cents.
Yeah, I’d practice a bit on the walls around the house before taking on that commission.

That ain’t so much drawn as painted.

I just got a nice Smith & Wesson trade mark logo T-shirt from US Farmer for $17 maybe lower your sights a bit and just get one of those ... lol
 

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Discussion Starter #13
drawing it is no big deal. that's the least of my concerns. i would do it as i have in the past, draw the outlines on paper then transfer them to the jacket. directly through the paper. coloring it looks harder than it really is, as long as i know how the ink/paint/whatever will react when i try to blend it. i have test shirts for that. my only concern is using something that won't run.

Is that representative of a certain....I dunno, band? I don’t recognize it at all.
 
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Do such things exist? And if so, how difficult would they be to use? Does it require specialized equipment, and if so, is such equipment expensive?
There used to be a business in Toronto that airbrushed T-shirts in the Yorkdale Mall. Airbrushing requires some skill and practice.




 
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You need the brush that has the bottles like the one in the picture on the book. A smooth constant air flow is also very important. It is better to have a tank style compressor and a moisture trap. The quality of airbrush is also very important. Cheap brushes will spit and the flow controls might not work very well. There are 2 types of control. Single and dual action. Dual action brush works such that when you pull back on the lever it controls the air flow, and pushing down controls the ink flow. Single action has fixed (but adjustable) ink flow, and the only thing the lever does is pull back for air flow. You can adjust the ink by turning the nozzle.
 

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I did that in Grade 10 - 1965 - and got into big trouble from Fred (the vice principal)
 
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