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I buy CD's of artists I really like to have collections. For example collecting all of the bob dylan cd's or whatever. Its a cool thing to do. But if its a random song from a band im kinda familiar with ill download it.
 

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I usually download stuff until I can buy the album...which for most of the bands I listen to, can take a long time cause they're mostly european bands...
 

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I download a lot of music, and I buy a lot of music. All in all I'd say I fall into that category of people who buy MORE because of downloading being available. I get to hear more stuff, and I get to try before I buy.

I am looking forward to when MySpace offers downloads for sale because I have heard a lot of independent bands on there I really like.
 

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Unless the artist has given permission, downloading is theft, plain and simple.

You can rationalize it in many ways but you are stealing from musicians. Now, if the artist has an agreement with a downloading service or has the music posted as samples on their sites, great. There's a lot of merit in doing this.

But, it's not up to me or you to decide whether an artist should or shouldn't allow downloading. If they haven't expressly granted permission, it's theft, no different than stealing cable or stiffing the plumber for his services.
 

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yep, I download lots of stuff. stuff I used to have, stuff I only have on vinyl or cassette, live shows, videos, import albums, rarities, checking out new bands and albums before I buy, etc.

still buy just as much as I did before the internet. maybe more. crazy isn't it.

what's really changed for me is the way that I buy music. I do not shop at local stores and buy most of my cds/ records from ebay or online stores for half the price.
 

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I'll download it if I can't find it in a music store downtown or online. I usually download stuff from lesser known acts, if I like it I'll go look for it, if I don't I delete it. In the last year I would say I have bought several CD's due to downloading.
 

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if i like the music that i've downloaded, i usually buy the album. if i don't, i usually delete the mp3s. so basically, downloading is a way for me to sample music, i think. :D
 

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Exercise in futility

Getting harder and harder these days to rip off anything for my vinyl collection...
 

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I dl stuff that I already have a copy of, like my dad has hundreds, probably thousands, of records, tapes, and cds which i could rip to mp3, but I just dl it instead.
 

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I like the experience of hearing the entire album so I always pay for my music. I usually hear about new and interesting artists on our local public radio station. You don't have to give money to the radio station but twice a year they have a sponsorship drive. Sometimes I pledge my support and sometimes I don't...depends on how many $$$ are in my pocket. But no, I don't download "free" music.
 

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Alot of bands give away their stuff and let you download them, sometimes even on their own site. Its usually because they were ****ed over by a label. Bands make 95% of their money from touring. Alot of times, an MP3 is the only way you will ever get to hear some bands. I can walk into HMV, or CD Warehouse or whereever and I can guarentee you that at any time I will only find cds from about 5% of the bands I listen too. Last week I wanted to get the Rods discography on cd. I have it on record, but I wanted the cds. I emailed Carl Canedy, the Rods drummer, and he cant even get the cds. Downloading is not evil at all. If you want to see evil in the music industry its major labels and ticketmaster...................
 

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^^
dont the artists only get like 5% of cd sales anyway...if that...?
 

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This is a very touchy subject. On the one hand, I find it theft and ripping off musicians. On the other hand, it's alowed me to sample a band I've never heard anything from, and in many cases prompting me to buy the album. I'm on dial-up, so it's not feasable for me to download complete albums at any rate.

As a musician in a cover band, downloading tunes is an invaluable tool to me now. A lot easier than in the 80's. I remember sitting by the radio for hours just waiting to hit record to catch a song the band wanted to do. Don't need to buy or borrow an album for a band I don't like, but happen to be covering.

I like MP3's for the simple fact I can make various mix CDs from my own personal collection.
 

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I agree with James, if it is good I'll go out and buy it. Also a lot I'm looking for is not available in your local music stores. Not much different than borrowing your buddies album and taping it to cassette which was the way before the internet...
 

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I think the bottom line is, right or wrong it's just become a reality. I am 30 and it's fairly common place for me. Imagine what it's like for someone who is 15? So I think critisizing people for doing it is wrong and unproductive. You can only hope people support the bands by buying material if they really like it, and checking out the bands live. People need to find ways to work with the technology.

I personally think the future is when sites like MySpace start allowing anyone to easily sell their music (as they plan to do). Right now it's kind of a hassle to get your songs on other pay services. Something like MySpace is ideal.

Again, and whether it's right or wrong the music business really harmed themselves. The issues with how they treat artists were already mentioned. But what about the issues of CD prices? The cost of CD manufcaturing has dropped massively over the years as technology has improved, but the prices of CD's have not followed that trend at all. I buy tons of 'bargain bin' stuff, but it's my belief that ALL Cd's should be that price anyway. I don't think a CD should ever cost over $15.
 

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Well, I can see it from two points of view.

1 - the Artist/label
From the artists standpoint (depending on the artist) and moreso form the label's standpoint it certainly is theft. However, that's based on the assumption that the person downloading doesn't purchase the material at some point.

2 - the Consumer
From the consumer's standpoint, downloading is an opportunity to preview new music that they might never have exposure to and expands their interest. This can result in more purchases. However, if not it's just put abuse.

Now I fall into the second school here. For a while I had practically stopped buying CD's. Then I hooked into the the internet and got to check out a boatload of music I never would have heard from other sources. So, in the last 2 or 3 years I've gotten back into somewhat of a DVD habit and 90%+ of my purchases are a direct result of MP3 downloads. So, in my case downloading has actually dramatically increased my purchases, and I have developed a list of stuff I want that is as long as my arm.

Granted, I don't buy 30-40 CD's a year like I once did, but that's because I've filled in most of the back catalog of old stuff I want (and I have a DVD addiction also). But thanks to the internet I now am back to purchasing 20 or so a year, and I had been down to under 5.

It's a really tough issue really. My biggest complaint is not that the record companies and artists are whining about lost revenues (downloading is not the only reason, and not even the biggest reason IMHO - but that's a whole other rant). My issue is that they have been spending all their time & money trying to hurt their own target markets rather than invest in trying to find ways to adjust to new consumer shopping needs/wants. The labels have been force-feeding what THEY want us to listen to for so long that they're afraid to change. That is their biggest problem.
 

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Emohawk said:
Well, I can see it from two points of view.

1 - the Artist/label
From the artists standpoint (depending on the artist) and moreso form the label's standpoint it certainly is theft. However, that's based on the assumption that the person downloading doesn't purchase the material at some point.

2 - the Consumer
From the consumer's standpoint, downloading is an opportunity to preview new music that they might never have exposure to and expands their interest. This can result in more purchases. However, if not it's just put abuse.

Now I fall into the second school here. For a while I had practically stopped buying CD's. Then I hooked into the the internet and got to check out a boatload of music I never would have heard from other sources. So, in the last 2 or 3 years I've gotten back into somewhat of a DVD habit and 90%+ of my purchases are a direct result of MP3 downloads. So, in my case downloading has actually dramatically increased my purchases, and I have developed a list of stuff I want that is as long as my arm.

Granted, I don't buy 30-40 CD's a year like I once did, but that's because I've filled in most of the back catalog of old stuff I want (and I have a DVD addiction also). But thanks to the internet I now am back to purchasing 20 or so a year, and I had been down to under 5.

It's a really tough issue really. My biggest complaint is not that the record companies and artists are whining about lost revenues (downloading is not the only reason, and not even the biggest reason IMHO - but that's a whole other rant). My issue is that they have been spending all their time & money trying to hurt their own target markets rather than invest in trying to find ways to adjust to new consumer shopping needs/wants. The labels have been force-feeding what THEY want us to listen to for so long that they're afraid to change. That is their biggest problem.

Saying downloading is acceptable if you later buy (or intend to do so) the disk is a bit like saying "oh I only borroewed that ---- from Walmart. I intend to go in later and give them the money".


My view is that the technology has changed the industry for keeps. There's no sense clinging to the way things used to be. Bands and the industry in general are scrambling to find effective ways to be paid for downloading. That's fine and there's no putting the genie back in the bottle.

Downloading is here to stay.

The fact remains, that unless the owner of the intellectual property you are downloading has expressly granted permission, you're stealing (Canada's pathetic intellectual property rights laws notwithstanding).
 
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