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Anyone tried one of these? I noticed their phaser on ebay but I cannot find any samples or reviews on the net.

The price is right, but I have a feeling there is a reason they are so cheap.

TG
 

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Thanks Jordan,

Your experience is pretty much what I expected. I may as well save the cash and put it towards something good. OTOH, I'm still a bit tempted since sometimes you find one pedal in a cheapy line that is really good.

TG



jroberts said:
I bought one of their analog delays off of E-Bay for about $35. The build quality is really good. Very solid metal casing. Nice and heavy. The sound? Not so great. There is a distinct metallic ringing sound in the repeats. For $35 I didn't really expect it to sound that great, though. I just bought it as a project, to rip it open, mess around with and mod. Hell, the casing is probably worth $35. Maybe I'll build myself an overdrive or fuzz or something and put it in that case.

The guy who runs the company is really nice. He shipped quickly, packed well, followed up to make sure I got it, and included a free set of Dot on Shaft strings. I almost feel bad for him that it doesn't sound that great. I hope he does well, but it won't be on the strength of the sound quality of that delay pedal.
 

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jroberts said:
I bought one of their analog delays off of E-Bay for about $35. The build quality is really good. Very solid metal casing. Nice and heavy. The sound? Not so great. There is a distinct metallic ringing sound in the repeats. For $35 I didn't really expect it to sound that great, though. I just bought it as a project, to rip it open, mess around with and mod. Hell, the casing is probably worth $35. Maybe I'll build myself an overdrive or fuzz or something and put it in that case.

The guy who runs the company is really nice. He shipped quickly, packed well, followed up to make sure I got it, and included a free set of Dot on Shaft strings. I almost feel bad for him that it doesn't sound that great. I hope he does well, but it won't be on the strength of the sound quality of that delay pedal.
you can get hammond boxes at an electronics store for like $7.00. (for next time)
 

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jroberts said:
I almost feel bad for him that it doesn't sound that great. I hope he does well, but it won't be on the strength of the sound quality of that delay pedal.
I wouldn't feel too bad for him. He gets cheap shit built in china with his logo on it for fifty cents and then sells it over here for 35 bucks. I'm sure he's doing alright. Heh heh.
 

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jroberts said:
I bought one of their analog delays off of E-Bay for about $35. The build quality is really good. Very solid metal casing. Nice and heavy. The sound? Not so great. There is a distinct metallic ringing sound in the repeats. For $35 I didn't really expect it to sound that great, though. I just bought it as a project, to rip it open, mess around with and mod. Hell, the casing is probably worth $35. Maybe I'll build myself an overdrive or fuzz or something and put it in that case.

The guy who runs the company is really nice. He shipped quickly, packed well, followed up to make sure I got it, and included a free set of Dot on Shaft strings. I almost feel bad for him that it doesn't sound that great. I hope he does well, but it won't be on the strength of the sound quality of that delay pedal.



Had exactly the same thing happen to me. I also bought the delay & altho' the price was great, it didn't do it for me & I kept my Danecho instead (for now). I actually sold it to my bass player & didn't lose any money luckily.
These are Chinese knockoffs & unfortunately sound as cheap as they cost.

Mike is a really good guy to deal with & the guitars he also sells look really nice & are getting pretty good reviews but I just can't get past the made in China thing.
 

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GuitarmanBlue said:
Had exactly the same thing happen to me. I also bought the delay & altho' the price was great, it didn't do it for me & I kept my Danecho instead (for now). I actually sold it to my bass player & didn't lose any money luckily.
These are Chinese knockoffs & unfortunately sound as cheap as they cost.

Mike is a really good guy to deal with & the guitars he also sells look really nice & are getting pretty good reviews but I just can't get past the made in China thing.
I can't help but think these might be tweakable into something that sounds good. Maybe one of the DIY pedal gurus will come up with something.
 

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GuitarmanBlue said:
Mike is a really good guy to deal with & the guitars he also sells look really nice & are getting pretty good reviews but I just can't get past the made in China thing.
FWIW, most of his guitars come from Korea...

Cheers,
Joe
 

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jroberts said:
That's exactly what I was thinking when I put a bid in on one on a whim.

I already have one mod I recommend for it - the "name badge mod". As soon as you take it out of the box, rip the "Dot on Shaft" name badge off. It cleans the pedal up nicely by getting rid of that terrible name.
lol....ya gotta wonder where that name came from
 

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Ya I don't want to knock the guy because I think he uses the forums, but that is without a doubt the worst product name I have ever heard. I honestly could never play a guitar with that written on the headstock.
 

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The Worse the Better

THank You for the compliment. It does have a bad tone to it don't it? People make fun of it all day, but at the end of the day, people are talking about it and have a good chuckle. Did over 300K in first year of business. Sold over 700 Guitars since January 2006.

“The Dot On Shaft name is incredibly significant to me because it represents principles that are near and dear to my heart and beliefs that I choose to live by. My wife Natalie and I try our best to run this company the same way we approach day to day life. We strive to be independent from the rest, innovative in ideology, intelligent in thought and iconic in stature. A common characteristic between each of these values is the letter i which is nothing more than a dot on a shaft when examined more closely. Many conclude that the name refers to the dot markers on the shafts of our high quality guitars but for us that perception is just a nice complimentary tie to our steadily growing business!”
 

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I don't see the problem with the name - am I missing a joke here?

I build, import and sell guitars myself so in the past 15 months I have been doing my homework on the whole guitar industry. Most of you would be suprised to find out how few of the guitars that you assume are made in North America really are truely made here. The government of China actually subsidizes musical instrument factories (among other manufacturers) so there is no way any company paying North American wages can compete with them. Indonesia, Korea and a few other overseas manufacturers are also selling guitars for cheaper than we can make them here.

So where does that leave us? Mike mentions on his website that he has spent alot of time and money sourcing out his products, I can assure you that this is not easy. I have spent thousands of dollars on sample orders from overseas guitar manufactures only to find out that 80% are pushing out total crap. Some of them look good, but have serious design flaws. Others look bad but play O.K., and alot of them are just plain bad. There is also a huge problem in getting something that is not a direct rip-off of another manufacturers guitar - possibly made at the exact same factory.

I am assuming that Mike's company does the same thing that I do, find a manufacturer that is willing to work with you and make a good quality product. Even after you arrive in this situation, you still have to reject 15% of every shipment due to damage or inconsistent quality. Every guitar has to be inspected, possibly modified to suit your needs, set up and intonated before it goes to market. The last thing you need is for a bad product with your name on it to reach the market.

The pedals that are being refered to here were sold at a reasonable price, I could see ripping into the company if they were overcharging for them but they didn't do that. Everything that I have heard about Mike and his company has been very positive, you have to respect that. He has no problem admitting that the delay pedal isn't all it's cracked up to be, so at least He's honest about it.

For the record, I have never met Mike and have nothing to do with his company, DotOnShaft. I just believe in giving credit where it's due.
 
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jroberts said:
Check this out...

http://www.analogman.com/delay.htm

That is the Analogman delay pedal that people are clamouring to get ahold of. Looks just like a Dot on Shaft analog delay with a few cosmetic changes. They are obviously sourcing them from the same supplier. I guess they do make for quite a good pedal if modded properly.
That's freaking HILARIOUS.

So Mike: is it the same on the inside? Or just a coincidence Analog Man ended up using the same enclosure?
 

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if the pedal really isnt htat great, i'd buy the D.O.S. pedal, a dano pedal, rehouse the dano in the DOS, and then sell the rehoused DOS.

im sure with a few simple changes the DOS pedals would sound pretty sweet
 

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I was fortunate enough to win Last Month's giveaway draw. One if the items was a Dot on Shaft pedal. I picked the flanger.


I tried it in the effects loop of my new tonelab LE at rehearsal and was so impressed with it that I decided to use it at a gig this past Saturday, even though the Tonelab has a nice flanger built in.


Well, in all honesty it's a VERY nice sounding flanger. I've had many of the well known makes and this is as good as any I can recall and in fact is much quieter than several I've had.

It reminds me a bit of the Electric Mistress or ADA, but is quieter than either.


I was expecting a piece of junk like the Behringer delay I bought on a whim.

I can't comment on any on the other Dos pedals, but this one rocks!

 

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Well if we are moaning about delays, I don't like the BYOC delay I built that is supposed to model the old analog pink pedals. I also kick myself for having traded my DD-3 which at the time i never used for a used blues driver and still paying tax lol. The BYOC in my opinion does not handle gain well. If you want to play pink floyd and self oscilate its cool, if ya wanna get some hard rock delay, don't bother. I should probably just go back to the DD-3 and actually use it this time. Its been on Shenker's pedal board for years for a reason i suppose.

In my opinion , it would be nice if dot on shaft could get into a classic line like teles and strat style guitars. Maybe they have them and i missed them. The company name is a bit odd but then again, you won't be reading the name on the headstock when you listen to it.
 

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Dot on Shaft?

I appreciate that Mr. Dot on Shaft is a decent fellow and that he's bringing in decent imports and selling them at a fair price.

The thing I don't get is the name of his company. To me "Dot on Shaft" is something discussed only between a man and his doctor, just before the pennicillin shot is administered.

:)


Jeff
 

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I was fortunate enough to win Last Month's giveaway draw. One if the items was a Dot on Shaft pedal. I picked the flanger.


I tried it in the effects loop of my new tonelab LE at rehearsal and was so impressed with it that I decided to use it at a gig this past Saturday, even though the Tonelab has a nice flanger built in.


Well, in all honesty it's a VERY nice sounding flanger. I've had many of the well known makes and this is as good as any I can recall and in fact is much quieter than several I've had.

It reminds me a bit of the Electric Mistress or ADA, but is quieter than either.


I was expecting a piece of junk like the Behringer delay I bought on a whim.

I can't comment on any on the other Dos pedals, but this one rocks!

Hey, I know who makes that pedal. The design is unmistakable. 35$ or so for his pedals? Great price. That's about what these sell for here in Korea (prices from the largest Korean online music store: 32 for an overdrive, 39 for a flanger, 42 for a chorus, etc). Whoops...Maybe I shouldn't have said that. Sorry if his prices go up.

I love looking at the Dot-on-Shaft site because I can often guess which factory makes his gear (and it's the good ones, too).

PS. If any of you are interested in getting a guitar custom made, give him a call and ask about the Kraken guitars.
 

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Take a gander at the schematics for most of the amplifiers produced in the early to mid-1950s. The vast majority will look alike, largely because there are certain things you absolutely HAVE to do if you're using a 5Y3 rectifier tube, 6V6 output tuve and some sort of simple preamp. Indeed, many of the early designers took their designs straight out of what passed for application notes at the time (e.g., Radio Tube Handbook).

The same is largely true of many effects these days, whether they come from DOS, Daphon, Johnson, Behringer, and a truckload of other pedal-makers. Once you decide to make a chorus pedal, you're pretty much sucked into using the Matsushita (or currently the Cool Audio) chipset, a 2-opamp LFO, 3-4 poles of lowpass filtering built around a transistor before the delay chip and after, yaddah, yaddah, yaddah. In other words, while there is some room for small differences, design-wise these puppies are going to end up being VERY similar to each other. Take a look at a few dozen schematics for commercial phasers, flangers, and delays, and with very little exception, they will pretty much all use a single FET, switched with a 2-transistor flip-flop to lift the wet signal from a mixing stage and "cancel" the effect. For the most part, differences will be in build quality, chassis type, and perhaps feature set.

Again, I don't say this to slag these pedal-makers, any more than I would slag Fender, Gibson, Gretsch, and everyone else making a 5W Class A amp in 1954. Some aspects of the circuit are simply compelled by the nature of the circuit and core components, and it is hard for manufacturers to establish some sort of distinctive personality on top of that.

Indeed, the vast majority of pedals ARE currently manufactured in China. It IS one big friggin' country with a lot of skilled workers who can apply that skill for much less than North American workers. Moreover, while use of through-hole components and conventional PCBs is something that a guy can still do here in his basement, once you decide to make the move to surface-mount, that tends to push you towards approaching assembly facilities in Asia that can do that for you. You can pretty much bet that if a pedal costs less than $100, the chances are very good that it was made in China.

I've known designer RG Keen for over 15 years, and some comments he e-mailed me when production of the Visual Sound Workhorse amps started up in China were quite interesting. While stuffing circuit boards with high quality control was no problem whatsoever to the labourers there, with no real native rock culture, and little sense of what the amps were supposed to sound like to the ears of musicians, he found himself having to go over and tutor the folks building the amps on tone. That is, I suppose, yet one more reason why any use of Asian manufacturing facilities/labour tends to necessitate a fairly standardized approach to design; if you had to rely on tuning a circuit by ear, you'd be kind of stuck. Consequently, pedals made by Asian jobbers tend to be conservative in design, and the sort of thing a completely unmusical person can paint by numbers, so to speak. Not a sin, really. I can't imagine the legendary Abigail Ybarra is any sort of guitar slinger and tone-meister even though she winds/wound pickups for the greats, and I can't imagine everyone at Peavey in any of their southern plants who puts tolex on amps is a walking Bob Thiele either.

Incidentally, Asian jobbers that crank out pedals under different manufacturer names is far from a recent phenomenon. The Univox Superfuzz appeared under at least a half dozen manufacturer names that I know of, and even something as seemingly idiosyncratic as the Mutron envelope filter seems to have been produced under around a half-dozen licensed names. I had a "Funky Filter" (bought in 1978 for $25 from Pongetti Music in Hamilton) and had absolutely no idea it was really a Mutron. http://filters.muziq.be/model/musitronics/mutron3

Finally, many of the review comments one sees about pedals tend to be based on the reviewer's experience with one copy of pedal X and one copy of pedal Y. In a world of 5% tolerance resistors and 10-20% tolerance caps, there can be more than enough variation in pedal performance that the reviewer may mistakenly be thinking that pedal X is noisier or more whatever than pedal Y, when they are really comparing an example of each. Though quality control has increased dramatically in the last 25 years (and you certainly would NOT have seen 1% resistors in anything made before 1980), there is still some pedal-to-pedal variation to be expected. Ironically, though you would think component tolerance, multiplied by the number of components used for a pedal would make the more complex designs more variable, it tends to be the case that the simplest designs (e.g., Fuzz Face derivatives) show more pedal-topedal variation, simply because in a simple design each component, and differences between them, matters.
 

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That is, I suppose, yet one more reason why any use of Asian manufacturing facilities/labour tends to necessitate a fairly standardized approach to design; if you had to rely on tuning a circuit by ear, you'd be kind of stuck. Consequently, pedals made by Asian jobbers tend to be conservative in design, and the sort of thing a completely unmusical person can paint by numbers, so to speak.
Sure... If you say so...

http://www.moollon.com/default_e.asp

http://www.ultimateguitargear.com/tone_party_reviews_moollon.htm
 
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