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I have 2 border collies. I have had Advantix II from the vet, but it is way expensive, and I hear it can be bought online for a considerable savings. Anyone care to share their tic med strategy?
 

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I do whatever the vet recommends.
 

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I don't like that poison going all over me when I forget they have it on and pet them. If it lasts a month inside them, who knows what's happening to me.

We switched to the pills and it's been great. Not sure about the money part - my wife deals with the vet (so I'm probably get royally fucked). I just tried asking her and she got pretty defensive. I think I pay $75/month for the whole season. I'll be checking online soon too.
 

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I don't like that poison going all over me when I forget they have it on and pet them. If it lasts a month inside them, who knows what's happening to me.

We switched to the pills and it's been great. Not sure about the money part - my wife deals with the vet (so I'm probably get royally fucked). I just tried asking her and she got pretty defensive. I think I pay $75/month for the whole season. I'll be checking online soon too.
I was never comfortable using the drops either. I too am looking to switch to pills or chews.
 
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I was never comfortable using the drops either. I too am looking to switch to pills or chews.
I would suspect the pills are worse for the dog than drops, plus wouldn't a toxin come out through their skin anyway?
 
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I don't like that poison going all over me when I forget they have it on and pet them. If it lasts a month inside them, who knows what's happening to me.

We switched to the pills and it's been great. Not sure about the money part - my wife deals with the vet (so I'm probably get royally fucked). I just tried asking her and she got pretty defensive. I think I pay $75/month for the whole season. I'll be checking online soon too.
Interesting article on the internal meds:
Examining insecticides afoxolaner and fluralaner as used in flea and tick preventatives * DOGthusiast: for dog enthusiasts with active dogs

They require an actual prescription which vets in Canada may not want to give unless they fill it. The skin drops don't though.
 

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Interesting article on the internal meds:
Examining insecticides afoxolaner and fluralaner as used in flea and tick preventatives * DOGthusiast: for dog enthusiasts with active dogs

They require an actual prescription which vets in Canada may not want to give unless they fill it. The skin drops don't though.
I don't think you can win with anything you put on them. It's all poison. I just use the poison we've been using the longest without issue.

Small dogs are a bigger concern - even advantix can give them neurological disorders. There's a few sad videos on youtube showing the effects (I'd avoid them, tbh).
 

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Thanks to this thread i will ask if we have our tick "medicine" yet. I dont know what idea is worse, ticks on pupper or giving her anti-tick medication.
 
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I don't think you can win with anything you put on them. It's all poison. I just use the poison we've been using the longest without issue.

Small dogs are a bigger concern - even advantix can give them neurological disorders. There's a few sad videos on youtube showing the effects (I'd avoid them, tbh).
In the comments on the page I linked one poster says natural repellents work just as well. She comments more but here are her main strategies (I am only thinking about #2 & #4):

1) Food. The first and foremost thing to consider is diet, I feel. There is a lot of evidence around raw and/or home-cooked meals greatly influencing (reducing) pests. Has many other benefits, including related ones, like supporting a strong immune system that’s very important for all aspects of health. If finances are a concern, look to meat co-ops or even local hunters who have game to sell. It’s amazing what’s around if you dig a little, and it can almost become a cheap way to feed a dog.

2) Garlic and brewers yeast. Very inexpensive (I use BugOff garlic for dogs from Springtime and Brewers yeast from Amazon – but there are many, many options), and can be combined with food.

3) “Tags” like ShooTag or related ones. I’m trying a new one from Only Natural Pet tomorrow. I’ve had anecdotal success with them. No claims to understand the science, and it could be coincidence, but I have had personally seen two cases in my own house where I’ve had fleas on the pets and added the tags and no fleas on them later in the week that lasted for months (my cat doesn’t get raw/homecooked due to IBD so she needs tags for sure). I was recommended these tags from a pet store that reports many customers swearing by them – was kind of surprised to see any result, but hey. No chemicals. I use them during flea season.

4) Try other sprays, such as CedarCide (I just ordered based on reviews – haven’t tried it yet). Can help with fleas around the house, and apparently safe to use directly on pets. You may need to find the right one based on your dog and what you feed.

And of course, with all of these keep up with the regular washing and DE or cedar sprays can help. When going chemical free, I do believe a holistic (ie: diet and supplement being of utmost importance, spray, washing, tags etc to aid) approach really helps – and although it is certainly more work, the payoff is a healthier dog without needing to worry about long-term chemical use.

For all of the above, remember it takes some time for the body to adjust and if using tags it takes at least a few days to take affect (apparently). Relying on the food for help can take a bit longer to let the body shed any toxins from the food and strengthen the immune system and so forth (basically, become the kind of body a flea doesn’t enjoy hanging around on).
 

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One thing I don't think has been mentioned is haircuts, or an 'almost' shave. If your dog gets lots of ticks, it will help avoid many of them. And your dog can still carry them around and wipe them on to your before any of those tick solutions have any effect. So you want to avoid those brush-offs too.
 
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One thing I don't think has been mentioned is haircuts, or an 'almost' shave. If your dog gets lots of ticks, it will help avoid many of them. And your dog can still carry them around and wipe them on to your before any of those tick solutions have any effect. So you want to avoid those brush-offs too.
I am not sure if it is good to shave an outdoor farm dog, as their fur is important for heating and cooling. The oral meds for ticks takes at least 48 hours to kill them, while the skin contact stuff works right away. So if you want to stop limes disease the oral is not very good. All this is info I have read in the last 12 hrs. I am not a veterinarian, but I am a contrarian.
 

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I don’t. Some vets are becoming like used car salesmen. I will not feed my pets science diet...total garbage
It took us awhile to find one, but our vet is very budget conscious and realistic.
When we lived in Oakville we had the other kind of vet, the “how could you put a price on the life of your pet?” kind. Out here in the sticks, they’re a lot more down to earth, and have even given us cheaper human versions of meds instead of the more expensive pet grade ones (crazy, ain’t it?). So they’ve earned our trust.
In terms of food, I do my own research and buy accordingly at a dedicated pet food store like Global or Rens. We typically buy the big bags of Wellness or Orijen, that sort of thing.

TBH, unless you take your dog through wilderness trails and that sort of thing, I’m not sure how important tick protection really is.
But an ounce of protection is worth a pound of cure.
 
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