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How Much Does Marketing Affect You?

  • No Effect

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  • 10%

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  • 11-20%

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  • 71-80%

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    Votes: 2 11.8%
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We are all aware that we are being bombarded with advertising and marketing schemes. What effect does it have on you? Can you remember something you have purchased lately because of marketing? Or perhaps you have a longtime influence from marketing.

When I was thinking of this I first said no as I have become very cynical over the years. But it does affect me a little and more at sometimes than other times.

What turns me off is marketing that insults my intelligence. Those companies have lost me as a customer forever.
 

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We are all aware that we are being bombarded with advertising and marketing schemes. What effect does it have on you? Can you remember something you have purchased lately because of marketing? Or perhaps you have a longtime influence from marketing.

When I was thinking of this I first said no as I have become very cynical over the years. But it does affect me a little and more at sometimes than other times.

What turns me off is marketing that insults my intelligence. Those companies have lost me as a customer forever.
How did they insult your intelligence?
 

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My television has not been turned on or even plugged into an electric outlet for almost 3 years and I rarely turned it on in the years before that. Anytime I did watch it I would mute the commercials. Don't listen to the radio in my truck - just listen to stuff I've got off youtube and flipped onto MP3 / CD and that's because I want to learn it so sometimes 4 different versions of the same song in a row and I draw from that how I'm gonna do it.

Advertising and marketing gets on my nerves which is what some of it is designed to do. In a broader sense it's also about formulating your attitude towards buying shit in general. Can't say for sure that I'm not influenced by something out there but my general reaction is that advertisers can take their garbage view of the world and drop dead asap.

Edit: should maybe add that I don't mind some decent business letting people know that they are out there etc. I needed a RedEye preamp and found a good supplier/store by accessing their website. The thing arrived on time with a hand written note from the seller saying "I think yer gonna like this preamp" and yeah, I do like it. It's the manipulative, idiotic mainstream commercial advertising crap that I don't like.
 

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To really answer this, we would need a test case in our society that has never been marketed to. Helen Keller, perhaps? Other than that, I can't think of anyone even close.

It's way more than TV and radio. When you're out, every billboard or fixed ad you see - on buses, on people hats and jackets and bags, OMG it's everywhere. Do people really think they aren't being targeted every time they go on line?

And if you think it doesn't work on you, look at the amount spent on it every year. Everyone but you? Yea, OK........:confused:

Does Advertising Affect Your Choice of Products?
 

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I said it has no effect because I didnt have a negative effect option, lately marketing has insulted my intellegence and pissed me off so bad I dont believe anything "they" say and actually think its all lies...j
 

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Marketing is the reason I like to have a drink in the morning. Start the day off right.
I don't know why, but every morning I think to myself "...the best part of waking up, is Folgers in my cup".
But this time of day I need the pause that refreshes. But Im still not me when Im hungry. I find Snickers satisfies.
 

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I don't know why, but every morning I think to myself "...the best part of waking up, is Folgers in my cup".
But this time of day I need the pause that refreshes. But Im still not me when Im hungry. I find Snickers satisfies.
Have a Snickers and you'll be more like yourself then..............
 

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I don't know why, but every morning I think to myself "...the best part of waking up, is Folgers in my cup".
But this time of day I need the pause that refreshes. But Im still not me when Im hungry. I find Snickers satisfies.
Folgers..., Budweiser, same thing.
 

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We all deserve a break today. So just do it.

Are you loving it?
 

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What does "work on" mean? Do you mean that we end up preferring, or even wanting, something without being aware that advertising has affected our choice and wants? Do you mean that we are aware that we are being deliberately addressed by others, in an attempt to persuade us, and it has prompted us to more extensively consider the pros and cons of something to ponder whether we want or prefer it?

If I use Trivago, because of the ads with the guy who needs a shave as badly as I do at the moment, but DO NOT consider any other alternative, is that the sort of "work on" you mean? Or if I decide I'll give it a whirl and see how it compares to other things (excluding what I've never heard of) before going with it?

There's different sorts of "works on".
 

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I take "works on" to be the same as "have any effect on".

Advertisers aren't the devil, but they spend a lot of time and money convincing the public that they and their effects don't exist. And it works quite a bit, I think.
 

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I think it works on the level of a name being implanted in our memory.

ive see lots of posts on the web where someone is looking for a review/reference for X....lets say, a good plumber.....and a poster says "...well...ive heard ABC plumbers (ones who advertise a lot) are good..."...when pressed what they mean by that, they often don't have any actual experiences direct or indirect, they just have the perception that because the company advertises a lot they must be good.
I suppose theres a grain of truth to it...in the sense that advertising is expensive so you must be making pretty good money to be able to afford it....doesn't necessarily speak to the quality of your product or service though.
 
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I think it works on the level of a name being implanted in our memory.

ive see lots of posts on the web where someone is looking for a review/reference for X....lets say, a good plumber.....and a poster says "...well...ive heard ABC plumbers (ones who advertise a lot) are good..."...when pressed what they mean by that, they often don't have any actual experiences direct or indirect, they just have the perception that because the company advertises a lot they must be good.
I suppose theres a grain of truth to it...in the sense that advertising is expensive so you must be making pretty good money to be able to afford it....doesn't necessarily speak to the quality of your product or service though.
Bose is a great example of that. They spend more on marketing than tech. For the money, there are better systems out there, but if you haven't heard of them, you'll buy the one you are familiar with. And that others talk about. And that you see in product placements. It's ubiquitous, IMO.
 
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There's more than enough social-psychological research to support the general principle that familiarity (frequency of occurrence, as opposed to conscious sense of familiarity) fosters preference, and the perception of legitimacy or greater authoritativeness. This is why some of the best marketing involves no message other than brand recognition through repetition (e.g., "RONA" on a team sweater or on the artificial turf)

An additional aspect of much advertising is directed at creating "false consensus": show some instances of different people liking something, and the impression is created/adopted that a majority of people like it.

The difference comes when individuals engage in mindless vs mindful processing or use of that information; roughly what Dan Kahneman calls Type 1 and Type 2 processing in "Thinking: Fast and Slow". If one is making a snap decision, then the "implantation" of information in memory can shape reasoning and perception very powerfully in many instances. If more deliberate thoughtful consideration is entered into, then "marketing" may play much less of a role.

So, if I'm in a hurry to get home in time for the game, I may grab soap brand X in the store because it's familiar to me. If I'm on a more leisurely grocery run, I'll look at soap brands X, Y, and Z, and think "Well I may have heard of X, but not Y or Z, but jeez, those other ones are the same damn thing and 30% cheaper, by volume."
 

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Depends on the kind of marketing. TV commercials usually deter me from buying items. For instance when I was shopping I saw a sign saying frozen pizza 40% off, but when I saw it was Giuseppe I resisted...I hate the stupid commercial, so why reward them for causing me pain.

But price inducements and discounts work on me, but usually only with products I have bought in the past. If the price is right and I like the product I stock up.
 
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And it would depend on the kind of outcome too. For instance, there is the impact on autonomous choice actions, as you describe (would I willingly buy Giuseppe pizza?). But there is also the impact on perceived acceptability of others' actions ("I'm gonna get some frozen pizzas for the kid's birthday party. Is Giuseppe alright?").

There is also the impact on choice when the alternatives are broad, as opposed to limited. I can't eat chocolate bars anymore, but if I could, the impact of those Snickers commercials on my choice (Marsha, Marsha, Marsha!) would be different if I'm at a grocery-store checkout where there are maybe 8 choices, vs a convenience store where there may be easily 50 choices of chocolate bar or other sweet hand-held snacks. In many respects, the broader search space (50 vs 8) is likely to elicit deeper thinking (Type 2) about the alternatives, where the marketing may have substantially less effect. Not always, but typically.
 
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