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Austrian surgeon Christian Theodor Billroth, who was also a pianist, echoed a similar idea in the 19th century, suggesting art and science complement each other.

"After a certain high level of technical skill is achieved, science and art tend to coalesce in aesthetics, plasticity and form," he said.

"The greatest scientists are artists as well."

We studied Billroth's procedures (I 'm still not sure why) ...they are famous.

Very interesting information about his musical skills and interests:
Theodor Billroth - Wikipedia
 

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Greco, I find it very interesting that you and I could be brain surgeons, especially me.:)
 

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I don't keep up with many of my former students but I know of at least a couple who have doctorate degrees, one is in medical research.

Several doctors I know are pretty decent musicians.
 

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Greco, I find it very interesting that you and I could be brain surgeons, especially me.:)
Surgery is certainly fascinating. I wouldn't want to study neurosurgery. I think being a hand surgeon would interest me the most.

A good friend of mine was a surgeon (Ob. and Gyn.) and his advice was to become a Dermatologist. The hours are excellent, the patients are typically not in in severe pain, they don't require a lot of tests/workup, the treatment is usually a topical cream of some sort and they (often) have frequent return visits to assess their progress.
 
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A dentist of mine had me give him guitar lessons. He said dentists he knew were taking up guitar to keep or improve their finger dexterity.
 

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A computer tech who is also a classical guitar player told me he was able to target musicains by the way they were typing. But I am not sure string players would become good surgeons : Calluses, my friends, are hampering your touch sensibility and a surgeon generally need all his fingertips sensibility. It is sure many techniques now became quite robotics (drilling, suturing) but I heard of a general surgeon who stopped playing the guitar during residency training because he did want to get rid of his damned callusses. Sherbrooke University would now use ergonomic principles as part of surgery training to enhance hands ability.
 
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Surgery is certainly fascinating. I wouldn't want to study neurosurgery. I think being a hand surgeon would interest me the most.

A good friend of mine was a surgeon (Ob. and Gyn.) and his advice was to become a Dermatologist. The hours are excellent, the patients are typically not in in severe pain, they don't require a lot of tests/workup, the treatment is usually a topical cream of some sort and they (often) have frequent return visits to assess their progress.
I think I'll just concentrate on guitar
 

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A computer tech who is also a classical guitar player told me he was able to target musicains by the way they were typing. But I am not sure string players would become good surgeons : Calluses, my friends, are hampering your touch sensibility and a surgeon generally need all his fingertips sensibility. It is sure many techniques now became quite robotics (drilling, suturing) but I heard of a general surgeon who stopped playing the guitar during residency training because he did want to get rid of his damned callusses. Sherbrooke University would now use ergonomic principles as part of surgery training to enhance hands ability.
I think you mean "sensitivity", not "sensibility". Not too many guitarists and other string players I know of get calluses on their brains by playing.:)
 
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