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Do you consistently listen to your own music after releasing it?

  • Yes

    Votes: 3 42.9%
  • No

    Votes: 1 14.3%
  • For Nostalgia

    Votes: 2 28.6%
  • To Re-learn songs

    Votes: 1 14.3%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I generally don't. Since we're on the bassist hunt, I've had to re-learn songs that we dropped from our set when the last guy quit.

I'm listening to "Let the silence stay where it was" going "oh yeah, that part".

Does anyone else more or less ignore their previous releases? Does anyone here listen to their old output with any regularity?

I will occasionally revisit my high school band's purevolume site to have a chuckle and play along.
 

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I played on several big band recordings in the past 20 years, and many of them are in frequent rotation on Jazz FM on the Sunday night big band show, so I get to hear myself even when I might prefer not to.

I also go back and watch my own YouTube videos occasionally just to remind myself I can do cool stuff when I set my mind to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I sometimes put jazz fm on, cant recall big band tunes though. That is pretty awesome!

I think I've heard myself on mainstream radio once, with knowledge of two plays.
 

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I don't really understand why someone wouldn't listen to music they've made. Obviously there are some songs I no longer like so I don't listen to them but for the most part I write songs I like so why wouldn't I want to listen to them?

That being said I listen to other music way more than my own music.
 

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I don't really understand why someone wouldn't listen to music they've made. Obviously there are some songs I no longer like so I don't listen to them but for the most part I write songs I like so why wouldn't I want to listen to them?

That being said I listen to other music way more than my own music.
If they're tunes that I continue to play, I suppose I save the listening for when I'm playing them.
If they're tunes on which I was a hired gun session guy, I generally don't have the time or the interest to hear them over again.
Most of my solo output is completely self made (sometimes a guest), and by the time I've played all the tracks, mixed, test listened on a variety of devices, and showed it off to folks, I will move on to the next thing. It's not that I won't listen to my old output, it's that I've got other things to do.
 

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Damn straight I do. If you making music you don't even want to listen to, just do us all a favor and quit it already.

Session playing does not count.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Damn straight I do. If you making music you don't even want to listen to, just do us all a favor and quit it already.

Session playing does not count.
It's not that I don't want to listen to it, it's that I wrote it - I've heard it, I'm gonna play it, I don't often feel the need to set aside time to listen to it. I love the music I wrote - which is why I'm out there playing it every two months.

I'd rather check out some new music, or catch up on all the music I've missed so far. That music inspires me to write more music ;)

There's so many bands and albums that I would have loved at 19 that I'm finding at 29 that I gotta get into.
 

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You can't appreciate or experience a song while you're playing it in the same way as when dedicated listening. I've heard all this before. Sorry/not sorry, but if you don't want to hear it (and I don't mean like all day every day, but putting it on every now and then - just like any other record you own), neither do I. Listening to other things as well (for inspiration or otherwise) is not mutually exclusive. Also if you never listen to it, you will make all the same mistakes.
 

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Damn straight I do. If you making music you don't even want to listen to, just do us all a favor and quit it already.
That perspective seems so strange to me... Do novelists read their own books for fun? Do actors watch their own movies for fun? Do painters "read" their own paintings for fun? Does anyone taking part in a creative endeavor revisit their old work for their own entertainment? I'd say the answer for most creative people is no.

In my case, the music I write/record is more like a journal entry than anything. I don't write and record music so that I can listen to it. It's an outlet, like writing a journal. I'm not a journal writer so I don't know this for sure, but I can't imagine people read their own journals for fun either. There's also the other aspect of "completion". In my case, during the writing and recording process, it seems impossible to get the music I'm working on out of my head. If I'm not listening to it or playing it over and over, I'm thinking about it constantly. That is, until it's done. Once it's been recorded, it is like putting the pen down after the book/drawing is complete. It isn't perfect, but I've said what I needed to say. I will listen to it on repeat for a week or so, then I've got it out of my system. Now I can move on.

You can't appreciate or experience a song while you're playing it in the same way as when dedicated listening. I've heard all this before. Sorry/not sorry, but if you don't want to hear it (and I don't mean like all day every day, but putting it on every now and then - just like any other record you own), neither do I.
I guess we all work differently. When I hear a song I like, I listen to it all day every day for however long it takes until I don't care about it any more. By the time I'm done, I've had enough of that song. I don't need to hear it again. I may put it on someday to learn it or to listen for nostalgia, but I no longer appreciate it the way I did when I was first exposed to it. I very rarely, if ever, listen to the same music I used to listen to years ago.

Lastly, there are a lot of players who prefer writing and playing music over listening to it. I can't tell you the last time I "listened" to music. I've frankly never enjoyed music in that way. The "fun" part of music for me is playing it, not listening to it. At the very least, I need to be able to sing along. When I hear a song I really like and want to continue to appreciate, I don't just listen to it. I learn it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
but if you don't want to hear it (and I don't mean like all day every day, but putting it on every now and then - just like any other record you own), neither do I.
This implies you know who you listen to, that also listens to their own music for fun. I bet you don't. Sorry not sorry to call you on that.

"If you never listen to it, you're going to make the same mistakes" - this assumes a ton of stuff. Let's start with producers, musical direction, membership changes between records for a lot of artists. Look at every band who's changed sound by *only* changing producers.

C'mon man.
 

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This implies you know who you listen to, that also listens to their own music for fun. I bet you don't. Sorry not sorry to call you on that.

"If you never listen to it, you're going to make the same mistakes" - this assumes a ton of stuff. Let's start with producers, musical direction, membership changes between records for a lot of artists. Look at every band who's changed sound by *only* changing producers.

C'mon man.
I get it- you don't like my opinion, but your crits there are not exactly airtight. So c'mon man right back attcha.

I mean your mistakes, not anything beyond your control (obviously - way to reach for an argument). This may be limited to just your playing, or may also include songwriting/arrangement, as well as other decisions (group or otherwise; including failure to stand up to idiot engineers/producers; at the very least you learn not to work with those types again, or how to construct a better argument, with example, next time - or it could be a positive thing - like the drums sound really good, so we should mic them up the same way next time). But even mistakes beyond your control can be learned from, and you are likely to not ever notice some things when playing the song. The mistake does not have to be yours for you to either learn from it or do something about it next time. You can say that you do all this when you are checking the mixes prior to release. This is not the case in a complete sense, and I can say this because I do listen to them later. There are things you will only notice later, e.g when in a mix between other songs, when you are not in a 'I'm checking my mixes' frame of mind, but a more 'normal' listenning state (not that there is a normal listenning state, but that it's not the same ).

Sure, I don't know whether most artists listen to their own stuff or not. The point is if someone says that, that work is immediately diminished to me, and or I loose desire to work with that person. I'm not telling you what you have to do, I'm just telling you how I feel, and I would appreciate it if you would quit trying to convince me that my feelings are invalid, cuz I sure ain't raggin on you.

That perspective seems so strange to me... Do novelists read their own books for fun? Do actors watch their own movies for fun? Do painters "read" their own paintings for fun? Does anyone taking part in a creative endeavor revisit their old work for their own entertainment? I'd say the answer for most creative people is no.

In my case, the music I write/record is more like a journal entry than anything. I don't write and record music so that I can listen to it. It's an outlet, like writing a journal. I'm not a journal writer so I don't know this for sure, but I can't imagine people read their own journals for fun either
Yes, I do expect that or they should - I suspect many do at least in a, not for fun per se (those are your words, not mine - when I listen to to other people's stuff I wouldn't necessarily call that 'for fun' either but perhaps that is not a hair worth splitting), but for personal-professional development reasons. Also some people do read their diaries/journals, if sometimes only years later. Interesting to go back with a new perspective. Again, not all, but it's far from being unheard of. Yes, both prose (novels) and music are art, but your comparison is not apt. Reading a novel a) takes longer, and b) requires dedicated time and focus (not doing anything else). Neither of those things apply to music. Personally, I find that I get great cathartic effect from listening to music, and moreso if I was involved in it because it's personal- not all of which I wrote, but some. They are great for meditating too etc. Incidentally, I do occasionally read some of my old writings. I mean, I expect people like Grisham and King probably don't read their stuff later, but that's because they're pulp, and they know it. This attitude I have is kinda based on that. I don't want to write a pulp novel that no one will re-read, I want to make things that captivate people on a meaningful (vs spectacle) level; there are novels I would or have re-read, and others I never would. People are free to write or record pulpy stuff, and I am free to not be interested in consuming it more than once (or occasionally, 0.5 times). It may not be fair to associate pulp with authors who don't read their own stuff, but I have no obligation do be fair in this context.

People actually have tried to convince me that it's weird that I listen to so much of my own stuff. I've been called narcissistic and other things for it, which is ridiculous - it comes from a very simple punk ethic: I don't like what I hear on the radio, so I will make my own (the late 90s and early 2000s were particularly unbearable; it's better now, but still). I say fuck that, to me it's weird that you don't, and I can say that without saying that you should, becasue that is not my perogative; it's not a personal attack.

So I'm not saying you have to, just that it is my opinion - curious why you care so dang much. I am interested in meaningful things, if it's just a release for you - like wanking (literally as well as in the guitar playing sense) or a one night stand - then it's just not interesting to me. I owe you nothing in this regard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
To try and keep the discussion civilized (I think we've done a decent job) - why does it discount it so heavily if the artist does not revisit previous works on a regular basis? I guess I don't see how that means they don't enjoy or aren't proud of what they did. Sometimes bands write their next album on the heels of the "current" one (quotes because an album can sit for a year or more before its release), during which I'd suspect they weren't pouring over the one on shelves during the writing process.

Again, it's interesting to me the notion of "well if you don't think it's listenable why should I" mostly because I *do* think it's listenable and enjoyable (regarding our albums). I just want to check out other music more than hear songs I spent months working on. I don't think not listening to previous albums we made discounts them, which is where we disagree.
 

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Yes, I do expect that or they should - I suspect many do at least in a, not for fun per se (those are your words, not mine - when I listen to to other people's stuff I wouldn't necessarily call that 'for fun' either but perhaps that is not a hair worth splitting), but for personal-professional development reasons. Also some people do read their diaries/journals, if sometimes only years later. Interesting to go back with a new perspective. Again, not all, but it's far from being unheard of.
I guess I misunderstood your original post. I see nothing strange about revisiting old work on rare occasion for nostalgia, to view it from a new perspective, to remind yourself of something you've forgotten, or to see what can be improved upon. Your initial post, "If you making music you don't even want to listen to, just do us all a favor and quit it already", was pretty vague as to the specifics, so I had to try and fill in the blanks. With more clarity, you can see we actually share some of the same perspective.

Personally, I find that I get great cathartic effect from listening to music, and moreso if I was involved in it because it's personal- not all of which I wrote, but some. They are great for meditating too etc. Incidentally, I do occasionally read some of my old writings.
I get that feeling from the creative process, not the product that comes out of it. For me it's about the journey, not the destination. I think that's the main difference.

People actually have tried to convince me that it's weird that I listen to so much of my own stuff. I've been called narcissistic and other things for it, which is ridiculous - it comes from a very simple punk ethic: I don't like what I hear on the radio, so I will make my own (the late 90s and early 2000s were particularly unbearable; it's better now, but still). I say fuck that,
Exactly. People should shut up and let you do your own thing. I find it weird because I don't get the same experience out of it that you do. If you find it cathartic, have at 'er. Nothing wrong with that. All I ask is the same courtesy.

So I'm not saying you have to, just that it is my opinion - curious why you care so dang much.
You have to admit, telling everyone who writes music that if they don't listen to it they should just quit is pretty inflammatory. Perhaps you meant it in jest, or maybe it was just hyperbole. It's tough to tell online with such limited context. Now that you've expanded the thought, the meaning is a little more clear.

I am interested in meaningful things, if it's just a release for you - like wanking (literally as well as in the guitar playing sense) or a one night stand - then it's just not interesting to me. I owe you nothing in this regard.
I compared writing music to journal writing. Unless you consider that wanking, you misunderstood what I meant. I too am interested in meaningful things, like gaining the perspectives of others through dialogue. I'd like to hope that this conversation has done that going both ways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
To be clear:

I'm not saying I never listen to music I've made, I'm saying it's nowhere near my go-to when looking for something to listen to. I am indeed proud of what I've created or I wouldn't be going broke and under high stress to travel performing it ;).
 

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I get that feeling from the creative process, not the product that comes out of it. For me it's about the journey, not the destination. I think that's the main difference.
OK, but consider this: if it's not about the destination then how do you know the journey is over? For me it isn't over just because the record is out. The song can still evolve (we still play it live or , and this has happenned a couple times, one band may do a song from a previous project).
 

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OK, but consider this: if it's not about the destination then how do you know the journey is over? For me it isn't over just because the record is out. The song can still evolve (we still play it live or , and this has happenned a couple times, one band may do a song from a previous project).
All part of the journey to me. I think it's cool to re-visit stuff and re-work them. Sometimes bringing a song from a previous band into a new one brings it new life. The new band can sometimes change it in a way I would never have thought to, and it makes it interesting again. So, I guess the journey is never over.
 
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