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The subject is sound. But the way it was brought up is idiotic. It's not about "playing too well" but about showing off. Same goes for anything. A show-off talented hockey player isn't as good as an efficient talented hockey player. People like talent. People dislike misuse of talent.

One cannot play "too well". He very well can play "too badly". But one can "show off" instead of making something great with his music. Its more about being good at writing music then being good at playing it.

Perhaps the valid question should be "can excellent musician write good music regardless of the technical level what they write requires?"
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Perhaps the valid question should be "can excellent musician write good music regardless of the technical level what they write requires?"
Definitely more catchy title! ;)
 

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Alternative title game!

"Does showing off hurt artists?"

"Does showing off hurt credibility?"

"You wont believe what this shredder does next"

"Genius and the musical asshat"
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Alternative title game!

"Does showing off hurt artists?"

"Does showing off hurt credibility?"

"You wont believe what this shredder does next"

"Genius and the musical asshat"
... Criticism of the article's title (which I neither support nor oppose, it was simply an interesting topic to me) is a turning out to be a good analogy of the article itself.
 

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Always remember, music is a social experience if that is what you are looking for. And sometimes it isn't and there will never be agreement on what music is best when you are alone. At best, try to agree with yourself when you are alone.
 

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there comes a point in that endless cascade of 1/64 notes when the music gets lost........or is forgotten completely.
 

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... Criticism of the article's title (which I neither support nor oppose, it was simply an interesting topic to me) is a turning out to be a good analogy of the article itself.
Disclaimer: i havent actually read it. I just wanted a chuckle on my lunch break.
 

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I find this cyclical. The 70s showcased a lot of proficient musicians, inventing new things in a then-fairly-new genre. Come the end of that decade and punk (and disco) take over as backlashes to classic rock. Punk lasted for a short period of time (showcasing attitude and agression at the expense of chops, INHO) to be replaced to a large extent by the hairmetal bands, all wanting to be VH, that ruled the majority of the 80's. Then enter grunge - perhaps a resurgence of punk or a Neil Young throwback. Very few solos in those early versions of grunge.

I'd be happy to see the instrument itself make a revival and replace house/hiphop/sampling and DJ'ing to a larger extent. If people are worried about too much talent, that has to be a good thing, because I don't see much in those to genres.

And this does go way back as well. Rachmaninoff is still a reference standard for keyboard chops. I don't think people hated him, or hate him now, because he was good.
 
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one thing i might point out here is this:
sometimes massive technical chops get in the way of creativity. it's not always about showing off.
how many super groups have come and gone since the late 60's all the way up to today?
think about it...every one of them i can remember off the top of my head was a let down.

chickenfoot = great players all, but the music is nothing special compared to the work produced by the individual members in other bands. this exact scenario applies to others, like
temple of the dog
the firm
down
oysterhead
dam yankees
traveling wilburys
velvet revolver
audio slave
asia
the firm
it wasn't because the egos had everyone trying to outdo the next guy. it just seems like sometimes too much talent in one band cancels out the greatness

Give me sloppy, real, dirty, nasty any day
in this case you might really dig my band
 

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I'm still trying to wrap my head around what "playing well" is supposed to mean. For me, someone who plays "well" exhibits exzcellent and strategic choice in what they play. Certainly the technical ability to move gracefully from note to note at whatever speed is required is part of it - don't want no clumsy oafs - but speedy execution of scales, or rummaging through one's riff repertoire at high speed, doesn't really demonstrate choice in any sense. Indeed, as much as I liked and respected Stevie Ray Vaughan, there were a lot of times when it seemed like he was just skillfully going through the motions and riffs until such time as he stumbled onto an idea. As such, sometimes he "played well", and sometimes...a lot of the time, actually, he didn't.

So the question isn't really "Do some musicians play too well?" but rather do some musicians have an easier time displaying technique than finding ideas to express with that technique?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I like the way Ian Thornley puts it. The song has to be the biggest ego in the room.
 

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one thing i might point out here is this:
sometimes massive technical chops get in the way of creativity. it's not always about showing off.
how many super groups have come and gone since the late 60's all the way up to today?
think about it...every one of them i can remember off the top of my head was a let down.

chickenfoot = great players all, but the music is nothing special compared to the work produced by the individual members in other bands. this exact scenario applies to others, like
temple of the dog
the firm
down
oysterhead
dam yankees
traveling wilburys
velvet revolver
audio slave
asia
the firm
it wasn't because the egos had everyone trying to outdo the next guy. it just seems like sometimes too much talent in one band cancels out the greatness



in this case you might really dig my band
Cream was the only supergroup that had magic
 
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