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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys... nephew handed me his guitar this week, and if I were a betting man, I'd say he or one of his friends accidentally stepped on the neck. Hoping to post photos when I get home tonight.

Basically, a few frets down, the fretboard is coming off the neck, and enamel all around is cracked. It's an inexpensive guitar, like a Montana or something but, he likes it and hopes it can be repaired.

My thinking is I'll have to strip the enamel paint off the entire back of the neck, possible leaving the sides/face of the headstock alone, and strip down to where the body meets the neck. Given I probably won't get an exact match of paint, at least this way it won't be as noticeable.

Would that be what you guys would do?

After that I was thinking I'd water down some titebond and use a needle to get as much into the cracks as I can and clamp it for a week. Or is another glue better? like the Gorilla expanding glue?

again, I'll get some pics tonight... never did something like this so a good guitar to start with.
 
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After that I was thinking I'd water down some titebond and use a needle to get as much into the cracks as I can and clamp it for a week.
Going by your description, that may be sufficient.
Having said that, I'll await your posted pics before saying 'go for it'.
 

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Titebond , definitely not Gorilla (polyurethane) glue. Without seeing pics it's hard to tell, as already said, but it seems like a good fix. Depending on how much you water down the glue, you may get some problems with the action. Water can expand the wood you know. Err on the side of caution. Many will add some water to get the glue In as far as possible and then push in undiluted glue as best they can. Good idea. A week isn't necessary for clamping, unless you dilute the glue a lot. Not a good idea.
Good luck, post pics, and clean up glue squeez out with a damp paper towel. Russ Parker
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Got some images... black enamel paint so, can't see through it like a stained one. Couldn't get a good shot but when I hold the guitar up and look down starting at the bridge to the top nut, it looks like a wave rather than just a dip/relief. Kinda dips (relief) then back up and a bit down again. Hoping its because of the loose fretboard.

Neck has that crack going around so stuck removing the paint to see underneath. Part of me wants to remove what's needed and try to colour match but, I think overall may be easier to strip it all down and do a better job at it.

Anyways, here's some pics...



 

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I would remove the finish just around the crack first to see if the neck is cracked, or just the finish. Or you could support the peg head and the neck down well past the crack and push down on the fingerboard and see what happens to the crack. If the neck is cracked you can save time and not do any more work. Russ
 
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This would be an area of concern.

Bumper Automotive exterior Landscape



As per your thoughts and RGP, strip the neck and do a flex to see what you're dealing with.
Worst case, you may have to router a small channel and glue in splines.
Or, hang it on the wall as a decoration and buy another inexpensive guitar.
 

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If the neck is cracked you can save time and not do any more work. Russ
@RGPGuitars Please understand that I am not trying to offend or be argumentative. I just want to clarify your thinking.

If the neck is cracked, would you choose not to do any more work because the potential for success is too limited?

Thanks
 

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No offence taken. I guess I personally wouldn't go further on an inexpensive guitar unless it was just for a learning experience, which I have done . If repairing guitars is an interest, then go for it. Even failures are learning experiences. Maybe the best ones. Lol. Russ
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh total learning for me... and nephew is happy with it, bought it himself so, not gonna be a jerk and say hey, this sin't worth fixing type deal. So... giving it a try.

Stripping the entire neck I figure may/not be easier than tying to paint/match a patch... mostly for the bringing the thickness up and sanding smooth. Stripped back may be easier if the paint goes on well. Also may see if he wants to go gloss again or switch to satin. But for sure I''ll just strip that area for now and see what's happening.

I'd like to focus on repairs and building... I enjoy it WAY more than playing. Backwards I know, but, I'm not very good at playing anyways. :D

I won't put too much into the acoustic (Huntington is the brand). Likely stick with fixing the neck if I can, doing a setup on it, and I got an aged bone blank for a new top nut.
 
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