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I know the information is probably hidden deep inside the internet somewhere, but I keep chasing the wrong links. I'm off to San Francisco this afternoon for a few days. If a guy stumbled upon a really cool guitar with a rosewood fretboard while down there, can that guy (me) just carry that guitar back into Canada without any CITES hassle? I know there will likely be some duty, taxes, etc.

Thanks in advance and my apologies if this is already in here somewhere.
 

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I know the information is probably hidden deep inside the internet somewhere, but I keep chasing the wrong links. I'm off to San Francisco this afternoon for a few days. If a guy stumbled upon a really cool guitar with a rosewood fretboard while down there, can that guy (me) just carry that guitar back into Canada without any CITES hassle? I know there will likely be some duty, taxes, etc.

Thanks in advance and my apologies if this is already in here somewhere.
I am not sure if you want to go through it all, but here is the information from our govt. Pretty sure it still falls under import rules, but I could be wrong.

https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/eccc/migration/main/cites/9e21fdbf-3f22-4caa-9417-c656c9dbedab/rosewoods-en.pdf
 
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I know the information is probably hidden deep inside the internet somewhere, but I keep chasing the wrong links. I'm off to San Francisco this afternoon for a few days. If a guy stumbled upon a really cool guitar with a rosewood fretboard while down there, can that guy (me) just carry that guitar back into Canada without any CITES hassle? I know there will likely be some duty, taxes, etc.

Thanks in advance and my apologies if this is already in here somewhere.
The short answer is yes. The long answer is I know this because I have done it a few times. They don't even ask. They had the dog out when I went across a few weeks ago, looking for pot. That is there big concern right now. Make sure this is not even a smell of it on your car; not Rosewood, but pot.
 
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You're fine. Declare it. It's clearly stated that you can carry rosewood across the border unless the rosewood is worth more than 10k.
 

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Unless it's something like Brazilian, you can carry it back without and not worry about CITES. You could also say you entered the US with it and not pay anything on the way back provided you do not have a receipt on you.
 

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It's always best to be honest and declare what you have. The customs officials record everything and if you ever got caught lying, they would give you the third degree every time and likely do a thorough search on a regular basis. Just pay the tax on the USD cost.
 

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You could also say you entered the US with it and not pay anything on the way back provided you do not have a receipt on you.
It's always best to be honest and declare what you have. The customs officials record everything and if you ever got caught lying, they would give you the third degree every time and likely do a thorough search on a regular basis. Just pay the tax on the USD cost.
If there’s one thing I’ve learned from watching Border Security, it’s that you shouldn’t take a chance fibbing when crossing international borders. And don’t take food you got from the airplane through customs with you and forget to declare it (the Aussie border agents on their version of the show are real sticklers!)

Also, if one has failed to learn that lying is bad, maybe it’s time to head back to kindergarten.
 

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My advice in general terms is,

Have your papers (passport / Nexus whatever) ready.

Turn off the radio.

Take off sunglasses.

Open all windows in the car even if nobody is in the back seat.

Put your cell phone away.

Answer ONLY the questions that are asked. It’s not a social encounter (don’t make small talk).
Many people will get nervous and start answering questions that are not asked. That often leads to a secondary inspection.

They’ll ask if you have anything to declare above your exemption allowance. Tell them the truth.
 

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Don't they give you paperwork when you declare going into the US? They used to. I always declared my camera equipment so I wouldn't have problems coming back. So if you say you declared on the way in and you didn't......
 

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Don't they give you paperwork when you declare going into the US? They used to. I always declared my camera equipment so I wouldn't have problems coming back. So if you say you declared on the way in and you didn't......
If you are going over for a day and come back with goods you would not normally carry in your vehicle, then they would be suspicious, which one should expect but if you are gone for several days or more, they would expect there might be something like a guitar or some other entertainment that you had taken along.

If a person is worried that he might be questioned, just take dated pictures and bring them along, showing you had the items prior to the date you left the country.
 
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Honesty is the best policy. Be prepared, have receipts, declare everything you've got. The worst they'll ever hit you for is GST. Most of the time they just look at the itemized list I hand them and say "have a good trip home".
 

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If there’s one thing I’ve learned from watching Border Security
If there is anything I learned from a friend who is a Canada Customs border guard, never mind watching television, it's that they can't prove you bought something if you don't have the receipt on you.

You're in K/W and you probably only go to the US to shop or vacation, so you have that mentality of someone who does not live near the border. People who do live right by the border cross frequently for misc stuff and they don't empty out their cars just because they are entering the US for a few hours. A professional photographer friend of mine always has at least $5,000 worth of equipment in his car, never had an issue or been questioned if any of it was new, he crosses all the time.

Same when I worked in St. Kitts. I would often cross over with a guitar/amp in the back, because I played with some guys in Niagara, and never had an issue. I'd show receipts of what I did buy, and when they did look inside my car, I would just tell them I had that when I entered the US. A lot of it is how you present yourself.

Not to mention this OP is returning on a flight. It's not uncommon for musicians to take guitars with them on extended leaves (I always do) and the Canadian guards don't know if you did or did not have a guitar when you flew to the US.
 

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If there is anything I learned from a friend who is a Canada Customs border guard, never mind watching television, it's that they can't prove you bought something if you don't have the receipt on you.

You're in K/W and you probably only go to the US to shop or vacation, so you have that mentality of someone who does not live near the border. People who do live right by the border cross frequently for misc stuff and they don't empty out their cars just because they are entering the US for a few hours. A professional photographer friend of mine always has at least $5,000 worth of equipment in his car, never had an issue or been questioned if any of it was new, he crosses all the time.

Same when I worked in St. Kitts. I would often cross over with a guitar/amp in the back, because I played with some guys in Niagara, and never had an issue. I'd show receipts of what I did buy, and when they did look inside my car, I would just tell them I had that when I entered the US. A lot of it is how you present yourself.

Not to mention this OP is returning on a flight. It's not uncommon for musicians to take guitars with them on extended leaves (I always do) and the Canadian guards don't know if you did or did not have a guitar when you flew to the US.
Just a note. I have close business acquaintances who have had their Nexus cards revoked for under declaring when returning to Canada and in one case by a very small amount.

I use discretion when crossing. If you can discard packaging it's pretty tough for any one to prove you didn't have those headphones or that Apple watch when you crossed to the USA.

And remember, they can demand your cell phone, iPad, laptop, whatever and you MUST provide passwords.

They can scan your texts, e-mails, pictures et cetera.

That's not just on TV.
 

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OP, this thread got derailed a bit..

Yes you can come across the border with a "personal" Rosewood board guitar you bought in the states as long as the Rosewood isn't Brazilian..(that's a whole different ball game as Brazilian is on a super strict schedule, same as Ivory).. Declare your purchase and pay your taxes and there won't be any issues as you're allowed to carry over a personal guitar without a Cites permit.
 
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