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Discussion Starter #1
am still preaty new to guitars and i just want to know what kind of cord combinations can be played anywhere on the fretboard. for example the 5th fret.

can someone give me some cord combinations?
 

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am still preaty new to guitars and i just want to know what kind of cord combinations can be played anywhere on the fretboard. for example the 5th fret.

can someone give me some cord combinations?

Chord combinations-Im not sure I understand. Ill offer you some information which may help you ... or not-

Chords can be combined in any way conceivable.
If by the term you are asking about progressions then it may be usefull.

Progressions are simply a combination of two or morechords, which we, by nature or by perception and familiarlity perceive to be the best.


A cadence is made of 2 chords- and falls at the end of a phrase-for example the chords E to A might be a V-I cadence if in the key of A. This is the most used cadence in western music. And is called "perfect"-if the progression was turned arpound it would be called imperfect-but thats going too deep for this post.

The lowest tone at fret 5 is A.

The Major diatonic key of A may be shown by delagating a roman numeral to each note of the Major scale of A which is
I ii iii IV V iv vii
A// b /c# //D //E/ f# //G#

triads made from these notes give the chord its name. For example a triad or 3 note chord f#-A-c# made on the f# note is f#minor triad...

The large case roman numeral designates the Major triads and the lower case the minors. When we add another note into the chord the chords become "sevenths".

So our 3 note chord f#-A-c# has become f minor 7 or vi7 with the addition of E and is now spelled f#/A/c#/E.

If the same thing is done with a major triad it becomes a M7th.

So when you see or hear

"Hey it's a two five one in A"

then that means the progression is bm/E/A or a ii-V-I in the key of A. To play this at the fifth fret is common-

It is by combining cadences & progressions that we can write songs. For example a I, IV, V in the key of C would be-

C d e F G a b

I ii iii IV V VI

C-F-G
If this kind of thing interests you then a good book on Harmony may be what you're looking for.
Hope that helps!
 

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am still preaty new to guitars and i just want to know what kind of cord combinations can be played anywhere on the fretboard. for example the 5th fret.

can someone give me some cord combinations?
I'm just guessing that you don't mean chord progressions...as in groups of chords, because all chords can be played in various ways at different places on the neck, so all chord progressions can theoretically be played anywhere you want on the neck.

I'm instead guessing that you mean chord shapes, as in the fingering pattern that makes up an individual chord.

What you are looking for - if that is the case - is moveable chords. Chord shapes that you just move up and down the neck to get different chords. Basically, any chord that has no open strings is a shape that can be moved anywhere on the neck to get different chords. An example is any barre chord... they don't have to be barre chords though, they just have to have no open strings.

try going to www.all-guitar-chords.com and use their chord finding tool to find movable chords.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
all of those answered what i was asking for

recently ive practiced some songs on Guitar Pro program. and itve been playing some barre chords. and some other chords ive never seen. but im still working on the combinations of the barre chords. and some other chords.
 
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