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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all, my apologies to anyone who works at Canada Post. I'm sure you work super-hard and deserve the best salaries and treatment from management, as I'm sure most of us do also. This is just an opinion from a consumer who uses the service but is not involved in the nitty gritty details of your contentious workplace issues.

Does anyone else feel like this Canada Post strike does not (or will not) really affect them all that much? Sure, things will take longer to eventually arrive, and more timely alternative delivery services are more expensive. But I feel like my mail delivery in the past has already been intermittent (no mail for days, then tons in one day) and that packages often don't arrive by the delivery standard date (or a delivery notice is left even though someone is home).

The intent of a strike is usually to show management that the resulting loss of service is detrimental to customer satisfaction and ultimately the success of the business. But I am wondering if the rotating strikes will actually have the opposite effect, showing that Canadians can handle degraded mail service without having that much of an impact.

For example, let's say the strike ended next week. The workers got everything they wanted, postal rates remained the same, but delivery times for everything just doubled, thus saving Canada Post some money. Mail would be delivered every other day, packages normally taking 3-5 days would now take 6-10 days, etc. Would you care? Sure it would be nicer to get things faster, but would a few extra days really matter? I think people would get used to it fairly quickly.

I feel like there are so many other options available (Internet, couriers) that I would feel zero impact from an outcome like this. If a pedal I purchased from a fellow forum member now takes twice as long to arrive, it wouldn't be a big deal to me. If I needed it faster, I could just use a courier and pay a bit extra.

What do you all think? Would a degradation in service really matter that much to you? Let's stay out of the issues between the union and management (that kind of discussion probably belongs more in the Politics forum), but instead focus on how you are affected by Canada Post as a consumer or business.
 

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My mail is sporadic at the best of times so this rotating crap doesn't really seem to make a difference. But last week the strike was at the main depot in Stoney Creek so the entire Niagara region saw no mail for 3 days.
 

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I'm thinking of logging a complaint. This strike has not stopped my mail one bit. I still get the dam bills and all the junk mail that is 80% of my mail. It seems like the mail is more reliable in this supposed strike then when there is no strike.
I've been thinking about it for a long time and I think its time to opt out of the "Mail System". Stop all my junk mail and transfer the few bills we don't have online yet to an online payment method.
Canada Post is an obsolete service. We don't need it.
 

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I'm thinking of logging a complaint. This strike has not stopped my mail one bit. I still get the dam bills and all the junk mail that is 80% of my mail. It seems like the mail is more reliable in this supposed strike then when there is no strike.
I've been thinking about it for a long time and I think its time to opt out of the "Mail System". Stop all my junk mail and transfer the few bills we don't have online yet to an online payment method.
Canada Post is an obsolete service. We don't need it.
With the boom of online shopping, I think that you're totally incorrect there.
 

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With the boom of online shopping, I think that you're totally incorrect there.
Yeah I'm not talking about that part of Canada Post. I'm talking about daily mail delivery. They'll fight tooth and nail to keep that because it will mean a lot of jobs. But I think its obsolete and not needed. They can compete with UPS|Fedex sure. Although nothing beats Amazon Prime.
 

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Yeah I'm not talking about that part of Canada Post. I'm talking about daily mail delivery. They'll fight tooth and nail to keep that because it will mean a lot of jobs. But I think its obsolete and not needed. They can compete with UPS|Fedex sure. Although nothing beats Amazon Prime.
You can opt out of the junk mail, you may have to put a sign on your mailbox,if possible.
Not sure if you can contact CP and have it halted that way.

As far as letters, yes, that aspect is dying off with online use too.
Parcels have become the bulk of the business.

I just paid $110 to ship a guitar from Ontario to QC with Fedex, robbery ffs.
Fill your boots using a courier.
 

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What I don't understand is that they are complaining that they have to many parcels to deliver... Letters are almost non existant and the parcels has saved they're jobs since the prior government was going to cut them down and now they complain because they have work to do !!! :eek::eek::eek:

Fuck them... Privatise it I say...
 

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My bro is still waiting for his gov't stash he bought over a week ago. Amazon can get their shit here in 24-48 hrs but Can. post cant do it in a week?
 

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You can stop the junk mail by the postman at the Canada Post website. Other stuff you need a sign. When I get home tonight I will try to remember to take a pic of the sign I made. Works like a charm.
 

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In my work, we get customer payments for big $$ to both Edmonton and Toronto by mail. Obviously we're encouraging everyone to pay @bank or online, but lots of very rural accounts and older 'not online' people. Yes, it's having an impact - and we charge heavy late fees, so our customers are eating the brunt of it.
 

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Haven't really been affected, other than my issue of Vintage Guitar arriving a few days late.

Yes, it is the case that the bulk of CP's business these days is flyers (not much pride-of-work from that, compared to old-school delivery of birthday and christmas cards from a middle-aged guy with a moustache handing them to you at the door) and parcels. I suspect the complaint from carriers/deliverers is not that parcels provide too much work, but that the system, as it exists, is not well-adapted to that. Certainly, if the parcel itself requires some sort of delivery confirmation at the door, then that involves more time than simply slipping something through a mail-slot, and the time allotted to completing the route may be insufficient if the parcel volume is high enough. And if you have a "superbox" as we do, there are drop-boxes for parcels that can manage a reasonable size. However, whether the number and size of dropboxes can continue to match what customers have ordered and are expecting to receive is another thing. In short, on-line shopping may be creating an increasing lag between what consumers expect and what mail delivery can provide, under its current format. As a society, we have offloaded "going to the store", expect the store to come to us, and I'm not so sure the postal system is designed to cope with the degree of change that entails.

Consider as well that all of that presupposes an urban context, where everything is close together. The days of mailboxes by the highway, with a little flag that can be set to indicate delivery, may be long gone. Which is why one of the chief complaints raised by the postal union is the lower wages paid to rural postal workers, compared to urban ones.
 

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My bro is still waiting for his gov't stash he bought over a week ago. Amazon can get their shit here in 24-48 hrs but Can. post cant do it in a week?
Our own forum honcho waited 12 days for his order.
An address label hadn't even been issued until a week later or so, just after the strike had started.
Brilliant move there on the OCS. They also had supply issues, all provinces seemed to too.
A shitshow, but one I wouldn't competely blame CP for.

Privatization is idotic. Pay more for shittier service, sure thing.
It's been a profitable business for the most part. I think the biggest issues have been mismanagement.
 

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Consider as well that all of that presupposes an urban context, where everything is close together. The days of mailboxes by the highway, with a little flag that can be set to indicate delivery, may be long gone. Which is why one of the chief complaints raised by the postal union is the lower wages paid to rural postal workers, compared to urban ones.
I think that's what was cleared up a month or two previous to the actual strike.
I think that they were calling for a wildcat if that wasn't cleared up.

I was talking to my mail guy just before the strike.
He said that all the little stuff was worked out, but the big issues management wasn't even discussing them.
Not dealing in good faith, no big suprise from any corporation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
In my work, we get customer payments for big $$ to both Edmonton and Toronto by mail. Obviously we're encouraging everyone to pay @bank or online, but lots of very rural accounts and older 'not online' people. Yes, it's having an impact - and we charge heavy late fees, so our customers are eating the brunt of it.
That is unfortunate for those customers, but it was a foreseeable event that they could have planned for in advance. They could have hired a courier to pick up the payment, if that costs less than the late fee. Or they could have looked into setting up online banking a while ago, or if that is literally not an option, they could setup power of attorney with someone who could do it for them. I think choosing to be 'not online' isn't really an age thing anymore. I know some younger people that are afraid of computers too, but then my grandma in her eighties regularly gets and pays bills online. Online banking has been around for decades now. However, maintaining a high rate of service for mail delivery just to ensure such a small minority is served is kind of like making sure telegraph services are still available for those that are uncomfortable speaking on the phone.

I suspect the complaint from carriers/deliverers is not that parcels provide too much work, but that the system, as it exists, is not well-adapted to that.
That is probably very true. There are a lot of other options for parcels though. If Canada Post doubled their delivery times without changing the prices, a lot of people would switch to a courier, thus relieving the parcel strain on Canada Post. They would still keep some parcel business for those that are price sensitive. As the couriers take on more business, they would hopefully be able to benefit from some economies of scale and might even be able to lower their prices a bit as they all compete to win customers from Canada Post. It's a win-win-win.

one of the chief complaints raised by the postal union is the lower wages paid to rural postal workers, compared to urban ones.
I never really understood this one. Doesn't the pay for most jobs depend on where you live due to the cost of living? For example, I would suspect that a graphic designer who works in downtown Vancouver would probably be paid more than someone with a similar position in Moncton, mostly due to cost of living differences. Wouldn't rural workers generally have a lower cost of living than urban workers, and therefore lower wages?
 

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Privatization is idotic. Pay more for shittier service, sure thing.
It's been a profitable business for the most part. I think the biggest issues have been mismanagement.
Privatization and competition would clearly bring better service and better rates... compared to union workers with guaranteed jobs and fat pensions...
 

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They have competition now with the couriers.
The couriers charge as much if not more.
When your a distribution Co. or just a shipping type of Co, your negotiated rates are much much much lower compared to Canada post rates...

Canada Post has the monopoly for mail and is in such protected by the government... Just like bell and cable here in Cnanda….

You don't see no unlimited TV, Cable, internet and cell phone service here in Canada for 29.95$ a month like in the States !!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Privatization and competition would clearly bring better service and better rates... compared to union workers with guaranteed jobs and fat pensions...
They have competition now with the couriers.
The couriers charge as much if not more.
Not sure if privatization or maintaining the status quo is the way to go. It looks like Canada Post actually has made a profit in recent years, but not really due to anything they have done... they have just lucked into a favourable market. However, Canada Post also doesn't really need to behave like a real company, because there is no chance of them ever going bankrupt, and that is a bit dangerous for the owners of the company (all of us).

But what if a negotiated deal to end the strike ends up eating into their profits, and then Amazon (their biggest customer) decides to take package delivery into their own hands and/or buy a big stake in one of the other couriers? Canada Post's only profitable segment is parcels, and the future of that is entirely dependant on making sure that they keep Amazon's business. Whatever Canada Post does, they need to either keep costs in line to keep Amazon happy, or plan for success without dependency on Amazon. I think they should go for the latter, because, let's face it, Amazon will eventually deliver their own parcels with their own couriers or drones.
 

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I never really understood this one. Doesn't the pay for most jobs depend on where you live due to the cost of living? For example, I would suspect that a graphic designer who works in downtown Vancouver would probably be paid more than someone with a similar position in Moncton, mostly due to cost of living differences. Wouldn't rural workers generally have a lower cost of living than urban workers, and therefore lower wages?
An entirely reasonable question. I guess where it gets tricky may be in what distinguishes urban from rural. For instance, given that you live in "the KW", does a letter carrier working the area south of the 401 count as urban or rural? Moreover, while we might safely assume that someone who lives in Vancouver also works in Vancouver and has to pay Vancouver housing prices, that would be up to individual employers who wish to attract and hold employees. That employer likely has no legal obligation to provide services everywhere i the country, so topping up salaries by however many thousands, to make sure they can get good recruits is probably about as complicated as that decision needs to be for them. Deciding how to adjust compensation for a national service is a decidedly trickier matter. Do letter-carriers in the KW deserve less than those in Hamilton, Hamilton less than Toronto or Vancouver? Should the compensation for individual cities "float" with current housing costs It would be neverending. So, they make a decision that, if you service an urban area, you get paid this, and if you service what they designate as a rural area, you get paid that. As Jerry and Elaine found out, it is no easy matter to combine the "this" with "that".
 
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