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Two the same length about 10 feet and straight into a Pro Junior from a LP Jr.

The Fender cable cost a bit more and looks like black fabric wrap but is probably plastic weave or something. The Yorkville cable is just plain smooth black cover.

Fender cable sounds fatter and the Yorkville is noticeably thinner sound.

I know that cost doesn’t necessarily mean better and a cable won’t add tone but it can take it away.

However, for these two the difference is there.
 

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bet you a nickel that there is something wrong with your Yorkville cable.
G.
 
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I have one of those fancy Fender tweed wrapped cables that came with a guitar/amp deal.
It was useless.
Gave it to my master soldering tech, @greco, and he changed out the plugs.
Turned out to be a short in one end.
 

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Because I used wireless units for most of my career and mostly made up my pedalboard cables and cords running to the amp from Belden cable and switch craft ends, I never really did any A vs B cable testing.

I just checked them with a meter, made sure my solder connections were clean and hot and went to work.

These days if I play electric, it’s with a cable, but yeah all my cords are good. If have trouble with a cord it’s usually an open circuit.

There may well be a difference in sound, but it really doesn’t come into play for me.
 

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Had no idea that there would be a difference in tone. I gotta try this.
I’ve heard that and I’d believe that there can be a difference between a cheesy cable and a pro quality one, but I’ve also heard that you can only get good tone from a tube amp, and preferrably and old one so......
 

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There is a difference in tone between cable lengths. I used to use 20-footers even though i sat four feet from my amp because I liked the way it rolled off a smidge of the harshness.

It was a bit of an adjustment when I went to a 15-foot cable, but I got used to it.
 

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I am a basement player that had always used modeling amps and the inexpensive cables, or the cheapie freebies that came with cheap guitars. I switched to the $30 Yorkville cables last year and thought I could hear a difference. I have now completely converted over to heads and cabs instead of modeling amps and now I know I can hear a difference. I also bought the Ernie Ball pedal patch cables because they were thicker and just looked better than some of the lesser expensive ones. I also bought another Yorkville cable for pedal out to the head. WOW.........I swear the sound got richer and fuller having switched to better cables. I have never tried Fender cables, but the Yorkville I have does not sound thin to me. Sound is relative though. Being a trombone player, I tend to believe my ears are more "attune" to sound nuances.
 

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I have terrible luck with cables.
 

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Physics dictate how a cable interacts with the electric circuit, not marketing hype. Physics also dictates how your particular guitar (passive/active electronics, resistance of wound pickup, value of pots/caps/resistors used in volume/tone circuits, etc.) reacts to the physical properties of any cable.

Choosing Guitar Cables |
 

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I have terrible luck with cables.
Same! Living out west for many years, I don't think I ever had a cable totally fail on me. But after moving to Southern Ontario, it seems like they all stop working after a couple of years (except the one @greco made for me... that one gets used all the time and still works like a charm!) I wonder if the increased humidity has anything to do with it.
 

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I put a id marker on the end that plugs into the amp, so i always have the current going in the same direction. I imagine guitar cable prices could get insane like high end audio interconnects and speaker wire if you want to go that route.

i use 15 ft. Yorkville Studio one gold plated, L&M lifetime guarantee they do stand behind from my experience,........ good enough for me
 

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Two the same length about 10 feet and straight into a Pro Junior from a LP Jr.

The Fender cable cost a bit more and looks like black fabric wrap but is probably plastic weave or something. The Yorkville cable is just plain smooth black cover.

Fender cable sounds fatter and the Yorkville is noticeably thinner sound.

I know that cost doesn’t necessarily mean better and a cable won’t add tone but it can take it away.

However, for these two the difference is there.
It's very likely that the two cables have differing amounts of capacitance. The Yorkille may be rolling off less treble than the Fender due to lower capacitance and as a result might sound thinner.
 

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At NAMM a few years ago a cable manufacturer (can't recall the name now - see the thread for seniors and memory issues) had a display and compared various cables in real time. I have absolutely no doubt that cables influence sound and was quite surprised by how much.
 

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I put a id marker on the end that plugs into the amp, so i always have the current going in the same direction. I imagine guitar cable prices could get insane like high end audio interconnects and speaker wire if you want to go that route.

i use 15 ft. Yorkville Studio one gold plated, L&M lifetime guarantee they do stand behind from my experience,........ good enough for me
All my cables have lifetime warranties. One seems to get swapped out every 4-6 months, regardless of brand.

If I could sell them all and get 4 custom mogami level cables made, i would hope things would improve.
 

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I put a id marker on the end that plugs into the amp, so i always have the current going in the same direction. I imagine guitar cable prices could get insane like high end audio interconnects and speaker wire if you want to go that route.
But, but, but ......... current is going both ways. There is no DC on the cable, only AC. And the guitar signal (current) is going back and forth at between 50 times a second and 5000 times a second. I don't see how plugging it in one way or the other will matter. Unless .......

.....as @Roryfan stated, if the shield is grounded at only one end, that end should be connected to the electrical ground, which only the amp has. The guitar is by nature floating and not tied to any external ground.

But that only happens with 3 conductor cables (2-conductor cables need both hot and ground terminated at both ends to work), like if you had a red and a black conductor inside the braid or shielding of a cable. Then the red and black would be hot and ground at each end and the shield would be grounded with the black conductor at one end only. This is to ensure any ground current flows only in the conductor (usually twisted for CMRR) and not the shield, which could induce noise into the signal. And this isn't very common in guitar cables, much more common in mic cables.
 

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bet you a nickel that there is something wrong with your Yorkville cable.
G.
Funny, I was going to suggest that the yorkville cable was higher quality/ lower capacitance like @gtrguy suggested. :)
This would be the opposite of 'something wrong', although many people prefer the high end rolloff of a poorer spec (higher cap) cable.
All that being said, it could indeed be a defective yorkville cable, but loss of low end is not a cable fault I've come across.
 
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