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Discussion Starter #1
I've posted about buying a new guitar, in the past... but now I plan to sell some video equipment, so my budget has increased. I'm now considering a Martin D18 or a spruce top Boucher Dreadnought.
Does anyone own a Boucher?
Or can anyone recommended another dreadnought which would be better, within this price range?
Home - Guitares Boucher
 

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Before reading me, you have to keep in mind I play fingerstyle, so I am not a strummer, nor a flatpicker.
I need 0,012 string gauge and 1 3/4in. nut width as Bouchers fortunately have.

I currently have a very nice Boucher OOO 12-fret (for sale on reverb and eBay).
The OOO name stands for the body shape as the neck is same scale as OM.
I do not mention it to push it but to add to my experience with a former dread Boucher Wild Goose (I kind of remember the dread had 0,013 string gauge, not sure now...)

As you probably noticed the hallmark of Boucher's is Adirondack top.
Models vary according to shape but mostly back and side woods.
They are great guitars but appears to me a bit bold though very well finished compared to Taylors and Martins.

I let the dread go because I had a nice offer for it and played it less than my Taylor 510 (a heart story!).
The dread was sold to a country singer/writer in the Toronto area.

I sell the OOO because I prefer Martin OOO-18 and Taylor 512 for scale and neck comfort.
I played both three alternatively for an hour or so before putting it on the market,
just to say that was not easy to make a decision, but I wish to downsize the herd.
If I did not have these "a bit more comfortable" axes, I would most probably keep the OOO.

Sure I would dream of a Bourgeois, Collings, Santa Cruz or Huss and Dalton,
but I cannot compare since I never saw any around here.

Hope it helps !
 

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Get a used Collings or Huss and dalton. That’s steep man.
Collings and Martin are 2 excellent choices but very different voicing philosophies. I like Collings for the necks, some of the most comfortable I've played but not my preference for tone. I find Collings very bright and a bit harsh where as Martins for the most part darker, fuller and more complex overtones. Although if I were playing in a bluegrass band I may choose Collings as they cut the mix very well.
Having said that, even though I chose a Martin D-18 I'd love to bring home a Collings D-1A to have along side it if I didn't have so many other priorities ahead of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Before reading me, you have to keep in mind I play fingerstyle, so I am not a strummer, nor a flatpicker.
I need 0,012 string gauge and 1 3/4in. nut width as Bouchers fortunately have.

I currently have a very nice Boucher OOO 12-fret (for sale on reverb and eBay).
The OOO name stands for the body shape as the neck is same scale as OM.
I do not mention it to push it but to add to my experience with a former dread Boucher Wild Goose (I kind of remember the dread had 0,013 string gauge, not sure now...)

As you probably noticed the hallmark of Boucher's is Adirondack top.
Models vary according to shape but mostly back and side woods.
They are great guitars but appears to me a bit bold though very well finished compared to Taylors and Martins.

I let the dread go because I had a nice offer for it and played it less than my Taylor 510 (a heart story!).
The dread was sold to a country singer/writer in the Toronto area.

I sell the OOO because I prefer Martin OOO-18 and Taylor 512 for scale and neck comfort.
I played both three alternatively for an hour or so before putting it on the market,
just to say that was not easy to make a decision, but I wish to downsize the herd.
If I did not have these "a bit more comfortable" axes, I would most probably keep the OOO.

Sure I would dream of a Bourgeois, Collings, Santa Cruz or Huss and Dalton,
but I cannot compare since I never saw any around here.

Hope it helps !
Yes this helps, thank you for your time...
I realize I'm too green to make an informed decision to buy an expensive guitar. I need to expand my world further than my local guitar stores.

A year ago I visited Normans Rare Guitars in LA... hundreds to choose from, but at that time I knew even less... and wasn't able to analyze their condition.
Vintage Guitars | Rare Musical Instruments | Norman's Rare Guitars

So I'll return to looking for something less expensive, until I gain experience.

Someone on another forum recommending an Eastman... any thoughts?
Acoustic
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Collings and Martin are 2 excellent choices but very different voicing philosophies. I like Collings for the necks, some of the most comfortable I've played but not my preference for tone. I find Collings very bright and a bit harsh where as Martins for the most part darker, fuller and more complex overtones. Although if I were playing in a bluegrass band I may choose Collings as they cut the mix very well.
Having said that, even though I chose a Martin D-18 I'd love to bring home a Collings D-1A to have along side it if I didn't have so many other priorities ahead of it.
Again, this proves I'm too green!
I'm learning to both flat and finger pick...
I hadn't considered style and voicing.
Thanks for your time.
 

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Again, this proves I'm too green!
I'm learning to both flat and finger pick...
I hadn't considered style and voicing.
Thanks for your time.
These are general guidelines I go by but not necessarily strict rules. Woods can vary and everyones preferences are different. I'm a flat picker and hybrid finger picker.
In most cases if you're a beginner you shouldn't sweat the technical stuff much. Just buy a decent sound guitar that you like and play away. But if you're contemplating spending the money at the Martin standard or Collings level you should educate your self on these different specs. And the best way to educate your self is get out there and play many guitars and take note of the specs and what you're playing style seems to prefer.

Flat Picking:
Dreadnought body style - adirondack top and either rosewood or mahogany back and sides
1 11/16 nut width. Theres rear braced, standard braced and forward bracing to consider. I have rear braced.

Finger pick:

OM body style -adi or sitka top I prefer rosewood back and sides for this
1 3/4 nut width prefer forward shifted braces. Collings uses 1 22/32 nut width a lot and I find this very comfortable for flat picking or finger picking. Sort of right in the middle of 1 3/4 and 1 11/16/
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I just played an Eastman for the first time in a recent visit to Cosmos music. It was a 10D. It was pretty nice. I didn't play it long enough to make an in depth evaluation but from the brief time I had it I liked what I heard a lot.
I found a store in Montreal that have them in stock... I'll try one this week.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
These are general guidelines I go by but not necessarily strict rules. Woods can vary and everyones preferences are different. I'm a flat picker and hybrid finger picker.
In most cases if you're a beginner you shouldn't sweat the technical stuff much. Just buy a decent sound guitar that you like and play away. But if you're contemplating spending the money at the Martin standard or Collings level you should educate your self on these different specs. And the best way to educate your self is get out there and play many guitars and take note of the specs and what you're playing style seems to prefer.

Flat Picking:
Dreadnought body style - adirondack top and either rosewood or mahogany back and sides
1 11/16 nut width. Theres rear braced, standard braced and forward bracing to consider. I have rear braced.

Finger pick:

OM body style -adi or sitka top I prefer rosewood back and sides for this
1 3/4 nut width prefer forward shifted braces. Collings uses 1 22/32 nut width a lot and I find this very comfortable for flat picking or finger picking. Sort of right in the middle of 1 3/4 and 1 11/16/
Thanks again...
Yes, I plan to educate myself... I've placed your post in my research file.
Last week I offered to work for free at a local co op of luthiers in Montreal, if they're not interested I'll look for someone else.
 

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I got a look at Kijiji, eBay and reverb : Many Boucher from first owners and a second hand dreadnough with cutaway at interesting price in a Victoriaville store (I understand they sell the brand).
Good luck in your quest : always thrilling to search a good acoustics.
Don't be shy to bring a few sheet music to give a serious try to any prospect. ;-)
Take your time and enjoy the journey ! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I got a look at Kijiji, eBay and reverb : Many Boucher from first owners and a second hand dreadnough with cutaway at interesting price in a Victoriaville store (I understand they sell the brand).
Good luck in your quest : always thrilling to search a good acoustics.
Don't be shy to bring a few sheet music to give a serious try to any prospect. ;-)
Take your time and enjoy the journey ! :)
I noticed you live in Levis, isn't that just down the road from the factory? Do you know if they have factory tours?
 

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I was told by a local retailer they used to be opened for visits Friday afternoon, but apparently stopped these meetings.
Should ask them since they used to take orders directly.
There is a video of Patrick Norman visiting them to get his signature model.
My regret is that I never stopped there while travelling from Rimouski to Montreal :
It was on my way, just besides Highway 20, but I would get there too early or too late in the day.
Now, it is only some 80km away...
 

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The wood grain looks wonderful...
Adirondack (red spruce) instead of the common sitka or rarer Engelmann spieces.
Engelmann is also great, but easier to get marked with pic or light impact.
You also have "open book" look, so that each half is the mirror of the other.
Dana Bourgeois (Bourgeois Guitar) once talked about sound effet of wood grain.
(I do not remember if I read that or looked at a video) .

But the quality of the grain is not all : If you get interested in sound, many other aspects get in the equation.
First "flat top" guitars used to be ladder braced (parallel bracing but perpendicular to wood grain) : this made the guitars of good ole (century ago !) acoustic blues (Stella, Kalamazoo, Gibson L-1 (circa 1928), Gibson LG-0 (1955-1965), and maybe another one the name just skip my mind at the moment). It is interesting to note that Lg-0 was made of rejected mahogany and this cheap all-mahogany guitar (30$) delivered the sounds of poor but talented early bluesmen.
Then came X bracing giving better projection and sustain to sound. Taylor comes with V bracing this year... Expensive !
And the different string brands and types may add color and sustain also.
Of utmost importance : comfort !
It is a whole world ! You know how many guitars we need to be happy ? One more ! :)
Yep ! If you love playing guitar, you will buy one, try or upgrade to another one ending with more than just one ! ;-)
 

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FWIW, I do not own a Boucher (yet) but I have a good idea of what a good guitar should sound like being lucky enough to own a Martin and having owned a Taylor.

Having said that, I once tried several guitars at a store and the one that stood out, I mean way out, was a Boucher dreadnaught. I don’t recall what the wood was but the sound that came out of that thing was incredibly rich and the sustain was just amazing. I could not afford it so I had to pass but my next guitar is definitely a Boucher.
 

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Plenty of infos on the web :
In my humble opinion there are no such thing as better or worst
I just have to find the right ones for me
Go out and play!
Dan
 
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