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My very thoughtful and giving brother found this and presented it to me today.
There is a lot of local history and guitar building information in it. In addition, it covers some of the aspects of the physics of the stressors acting on the various parts of the guitar.

It was published in 2011.

Has anyone here read it?

OVERVIEW

Every object around us contains the history of all the people and places that brought it here. But rarely is that history explored. In this book, instead of breaking an object apart to reveal those stories, they are told by building the object a guitar named Storyteller from scratch.

The text and illustrations reveal the rich lives of the people, places, and projects that breathed life into it. The stories range from people who were pioneers in landscape restoration to those involved with automobile manufacturing. The places include the high arctic, tropical forests, and vertical cliffs of the Niagara Escarpment. The projects include stage plays, laser physics and the establishment of the first Canadian diamond mines. By bringing together these disparate stories in one musical instrument the book makes the argument that art, science, and history are part of everybody’s life.




Doug Larson
Doug Larson is an award winning scientist, author, lecturer, instrument maker, and musician. Now an Emeritus Professor at the University of Guelph, he spends his time lecturing about the union of art and science and uses the Storyteller guitar as the touchstone to this philosophy.
 

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interesting, no never heard of it but it looks like it might be worth reading
 

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I found an interesting connection to the author. While visiting family in Guelph and reading their local weekly paper I found Mr. Larson featured in an article about finding a use for an invasive species tree, buckthorn, as a fretboard material. He has started the process of looking into its development. Isn't it interesting when the inspiration of science and art find their mix! Here is an excerpt.

A retired University of Guelph professor is undertaking a research project aimed at determining if there might be an upside to one of North America’s most hated invasive plants.

Doug Larson, a retired biology professor and amateur luthier, has already made several guitars using Rhamnus cathartica or common buckthorn to build the fret boards, and now he’s pitching it to guitar makers to see if the worthless plant could become useful.

“You want, for a finger board, hard, dense, heavy wood that does not absorb sound,” Larson said, noting also that the wood must not bend or warp. “Rhamnus has that property.”
 
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