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'59 LP Junior & Danocaster T
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JJN is a great player, and that's one of the cooler new Epi's to hit the market, IMHO.

W.
 

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which seymour duncan p90 is used?
 
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That MF can play guitar, that guitar checks off a couple things on my want list, p-90, gold top and single cutaway. Is this available?
 

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So this is basically his Old Glory model in an all gold finish. TBH I prefer the look of the black one (the inlays stopping at the 15th fret bothers me more on the GT for some reason). Has anyone played either of these models?
 

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With one less pickup, fewer controls, no pickup toggle or pickguard, and less machining, I would hope that the price is less than a "normal" Epi gold-top.

Mind you, the legendary Wilensky's lunch bar in Montreal, made famous in The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, and known city-wide for their "Special" - a sandwich of grilled cold-cuts on a bun, pressed panini style - traditionally charged 2 cents more for no mustard. Moe Wilensky, who spent his days at the sandwich press, cranking them out, put mustard on them as a default, and stopping to NOT put mustard on apparently interfered with his concentration and efficiency. So you paid extra for that. Maybe Epiphone views these guitars the same way. "You want LESS stuff? It's gonna cost you."
 

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Here I thought it was about Fender's 22 fret Boner bass.
359337
 

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Mind you, the legendary Wilensky's lunch bar in Montreal, made famous in The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, and known city-wide for their "Special" - a sandwich of grilled cold-cuts on a bun, pressed panini style - traditionally charged 2 cents more for no mustard. Moe Wilensky, who spent his days at the sandwich press, cranking them out, put mustard on them as a default, and stopping to NOT put mustard on apparently interfered with his concentration and efficiency. So you paid extra for that.

There was no 'no mustard' option. Mustard was compulsory. You didn't get a choice so no, there was not a two cent upcharge. And Wilensky's is a small place so Moe hardly spent his day at the sandwich press cranking them out. Their counter seated less than ten people.
 

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The spread: This hot beef injection (B) consists of one slice of baloney and five slices of salami heated on the army of vintage grills behind the counter. A slice of Swiss cheese (or cheddar) (C) is optional, and admittedly a deviation from the classic in its purest form, but it works to hold it all together. A smear of mustard, on the other hand, is required. “We used to charge 5 cents more for no mustard, then went up to 10 cents,” Wilenksy says.

From SANDWICHES : THE WILENSKY SPECIAL : RECETTES ASSELIN
 

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There was no 'no mustard' option. Mustard was compulsory. You didn't get a choice so no, there was not a two cent upcharge. And Wilensky's is a small place so Moe hardly spent his day at the sandwich press cranking them out. Their counter seated less than ten people.
There was always a no mustard option having eaten there several times when Moe was alive, and my father before me. I can't speak to the whims of whoever replaced Moe, but when Moe was alive, mustard was 2 cents less than no mustard. If mustard was 57 cents, no mustard was 59,. If mustard was 64, then no mustard was 66, no rounding up or down. I would imagine that the Special is now several dollars, at least, and since there are no pennies, the two-cent difference can't exist any more. A nickel extra on a 4 or 5-dollar sandwich makes no sense, and I doubt customers would countenance, say, a 25 cent difference for no mustard. So it likely went the way of the dodo.

But yes, the counter barely sat 10. Glasses with sticks of that dried Slim Jim-like sausage called karnatzel would keep patrons busy, along with the grandchildren's drawings tacked up around the place, while they waited for Moe to do his thing. When my dad took me there, he commented that many of the same pulp novels he saw on the bookshelf when he was my age were still there, decades later. I suppose there were probably quiet periods at times, but the lunch crowd was constant, and it was common for offices to send someone to pick up an big order for the office. You'd see plenty of guys in expensive suits who grew up "in the neighbourhood" plunking their attache cases up against the counter, and grabbing a special before heading back to their office tower. Not much different than the way I imagine some of the Bay Street guys go up to Danforth or Jane and Finch, to eat at some place where they grew up. So, with the exception of those rare quiet periods, Moe was going at it constantly.
 

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The spread: This hot beef injection (B) consists of one slice of baloney and five slices of salami heated on the army of vintage grills behind the counter. A slice of Swiss cheese (or cheddar) (C) is optional, and admittedly a deviation from the classic in its purest form, but it works to hold it all together. A smear of mustard, on the other hand, is required. “We used to charge 5 cents more for no mustard, then went up to 10 cents,” Wilenksy says.

From SANDWICHES : THE WILENSKY SPECIAL : RECETTES ASSELIN
The addition of cheese is from well after my time, as is the change from 2 cents more to 5 and eventually 10. The original had a third cold cut, rather than cheese, which I believe was "mock chicken" - a sort of poultry bologna.

But enough about sandwiches. Let's get back to minimalist guitars!
 

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There was always a no mustard option having eaten there several times when Moe was alive, and my father before me. I can't speak to the whims of whoever replaced Moe, but when Moe was alive, mustard was 2 cents less than no mustard. If mustard was 57 cents, no mustard was 59,. If mustard was 64, then no mustard was 66, no rounding up or down. I would imagine that the Special is now several dollars, at least, and since there are no pennies, the two-cent difference can't exist any more. A nickel extra on a 4 or 5-dollar sandwich makes no sense, and I doubt customers would countenance, say, a 25 cent difference for no mustard. So it likely went the way of the dodo.

Apparently you know more about the place than its owners. This is a picture of the sign that hangs over their counter (there is a French version as well):






When I was there years ago there was definitely not a 'no mustard' option. I hate the stuff with a passion so I asked. They pointed at the sign and said no. I chose something else instead of the special because I refuse to eat mustard.

But yeah, you know better than the owners.
 

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You will note that the French sign never used to be there until the PQ instituted Bill 101. Keep in mind that the neighbourhood was that of Duddy Kravitz's generation and largely Jewish for several decades. There is still a Hasidic enclave a few blocks over, but they don't frequent Wilensky's, which is what allowed them to start putting cheese into the sandwiches as the Jewish population moved to the West Island and hipsters started moving into Mile End to displace the residents. Both signs shown in your picture would date from the late '70s or early 80s as the migration began. I lived a few blocks away and ate there on multiple occasions when Moe was alive. If I would have had a digital camera 45 years ago, I would have taken pictures of the sign with the no mustard price differential. But you'll have to settle for this quote from a 2015 VICE article (Don't Mess with the Rules at Montreal's Temple of Fried Meats ) " Wilensky's is as famous for its rules as it is for its food—rules which, perhaps unspoken among regulars and locals, are literally spelled out for the uninitiated. The most famous, which has since been repealed, was charging customers who didn't want mustard. " This is corroborated by Sharon Wilensky in the article tdotrob linked to. They may say "it's always been that way since 1932" but that's just revisionism in service of simplicity and avoiding complications.

The film of Kravitz was shot in and around the neighbourhood where my undergrad room-mate and I lived at the time while attending McGill, although we both missed the epic news event when the horses pulling a cart in one scene, broke loose and bolted down Park Ave.. Apparently, Wilensky's had to be "modernized" a bit for the film. Richler's novel takes place in the post-war years, when Richler himself would have been in his late teens. By that point, Wilensky's would have been around as long as Richler himself, and if not in disrepair, still requiring something to make it look of the post-war period.

So, my recollection is accurate, just eclipsed by modern history.
 
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