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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my car (2005 Taurus) has some rust developing in the wheel wells (the part of the quarter panel that is bent over into the wheel well). I want to nip this in the bud so checked with a couple of body shops but both recommended different processes and I am not sure which is best. I am hoping someone here can advise.

Shop #1, which is a small independent shop, suggested sandblasting, sealing, and repainting.

Shop #2, which is a Maaco location, suggested grinding, sealing, putting on that stone chip protection stuff, and then repainting.

Can any car experts here weigh in to tell me which they think is the best option to extend the life of the car? It is in otherwise excellent shape and should last several more years if this rust gets nipped in the bud. Shop #2 quoted about $500 more than shop #1 but price isn't an issue.
 

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Rust Check. Kept my 1995 GMC truck looking good to 500,000 kms in Ontario.

The autobody places are offering a costly fix which will turn around and bite your ass in a few years at most.

Rust Check won't make it look better, but will slow the decay at a sensible cost on a thirteen-year-old vehicle.

You should have started with it a few years ago.

Right now I have the ultimate rust protection: I live in Saskatchewan. No salt.

Stay away from Maaco. There are reasons they are cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Typical ford surface rust where the paint chips off and leaves solid steel below?

Or is it rotten and about to be a hole?

Surface rust. It is on the part of the metal that is inside the wheel well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Rust Check. Kept my 1995 GMC truck looking good to 500,000 kms in Ontario.

The autobody places are offering a costly fix which will turn around and bite your ass in a few years at most.

Rust Check won't make it look better, but will slow the decay at a sensible cost on a thirteen-year-old vehicle.
I went to Krown Rust Control (same thing as Rust Check) and it was the guy there who told me to get it taken care of at a body shop and then to come in for their rust treatment. He said their treatment would slow it down, but wouldn't solve the problem so it was best to get it solved before getting their treatment done.



You should have started with it a few years ago.
It is actually my parent's car. My Dad passed away a month ago and I am taking care of this for Mum. Dad should have, but didn't.


Stay away from Maaco. There are reasons they are cheap.

They are actually the more expensive of the two.
 

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I think both shops are suggesting more or less the same thing...both will get you another 5+years out of the repair area if done well.
the main thing is to remove any trace of the rust, prime it and cover it to protect the area. go with whomever you get the better feeling from.
the horses have left the barn, as far as adding rust protection on an already rusting 10+ yr old car.
 
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I would almost bet there is a hole in there when you take the rust away.
I almost guarantee there will be. That's rusting from the inside out and it's very difficult to stop it. The only way the properly get rid of it is the sandblast and repair accordingly. I wouldn't spend too much, the car is probably worth $2,500-$3,000 at best and it's really heading into it's twilight years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I would almost bet there is a hole in there when you take the rust away.

This is a fairly recent development (well it was there, but only a tiny bit until recently) so I doubt there is a hole there just yet. But I definitely want to prevent it from turning into a hole.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I almost guarantee there will be. That's rusting from the inside out and it's very difficult to stop it. The only way the properly get rid of it is the sandblast and repair accordingly. I wouldn't spend too much, the car is probably worth $2,500-$3,000 at best and it's really heading into it's twilight years.

I don't know if it is heading into its twilight years. Other than that rust in the wheel well, it is in great shape (inside and out) and doesn't even have 100K on the odometer yet. And there have never been any major engine repairs needed either.

The fact that it is in such good overall condition is why I want to get that rust repaired properly.
 

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Wire wheel it, then POR15. It won't look good, but there will be no more rusting.
Good idea, but POR needs to be covered as UV exposure is not good for it. So.....same idea, just add a top coat to it.

Of course, some folks don't like doing body/paint work and I can't blame them. Not my favourite job either.
 

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Sorry. I need to read more carefully.

I see you are trying to do this forvyour mom.

The looks will be important to her.

Maybe that smaller bodyshop is more honest...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sorry. I need to read more carefully.

I see you are trying to do this forvyour mom.

The looks will be important to her.

Maybe that smaller bodyshop is more honest...

Looks would be important to me too because, other than the rust in the wheel wells, the car looks great as my Dad generally took very good care of it. Yes he let the rust thing happen but, as it turns out, he had both lung and liver cancer by the time that rust showed up and, even though we didn't know about the cancers until he went into hospital the week before he died, they were likely affecting him to some degree which would explain why he let that rust go untreated on a car that he otherwise took very good care of.
 

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I don't know if it is heading into its twilight years. Other than that rust in the wheel well, it is in great shape (inside and out) and doesn't even have 100K on the odometer yet. And there have never been any major engine repairs needed either.

The fact that it is in such good overall condition is why I want to get that rust repaired properly.
theres often a discrepancy between street value of a car and personal value, esp when its one you know well and can attest to its reliability, care etc. its hard to replace that kind of car...I find theres usually something wrong with every used vehicle ive ever bought lol

that said, some components esp those containing fluids or made from rubber/plastic don't seem to have a way of avoiding age related degradation, so expect some unforeseen expenses in spite of its gentle history. nonetheless, for the occasional use I imagine your mom will subject it to, with some maintenance and a new battery and some light body work you should be able to get a few more years out of it. hopefully you can find a shop that understands your intentions and needs. ive heard some people have gotten good cheap body work done at local high schools that have autobody programs as well.
 
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The only way to be sure the rust is all gone is to grind back to good solid steel, and then make necessary repairs to the metal, seal it with etching primer, then put a finish coat on.
If the repairs get into the outer body, you'll need to do more to get the finish to match. If it stays under the lip of the wheel wheel, then it doesn't have to be a perfect match.
You won't know how far the repairs go until the grinding is finished. From the pictures, you might be okay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
theres often a discrepancy between street value of a car and personal value, esp when its one you know well and can attest to its reliability, care etc. its hard to replace that kind of car...I find theres usually something wrong with every used vehicle ive ever bought lol

that said, some components esp those containing fluids or made from rubber/plastic don't seem to have a way of avoiding age related degradation, so expect some unforeseen expenses in spite of its gentle history. nonetheless, for the occasional use I imagine your mom will subject it to, with some maintenance and a new battery and some light body work you should be able to get a few more years out of it. hopefully you can find a shop that understands your intentions and needs. ive heard some people have gotten good cheap body work done at local high schools that have autobody programs as well.

I need another car myself and Mum has mentioned buying a small hatchback for herself (she hasn't even driven in the last five years so would need refresher lessons) and I would get the Taurus. In their will I inherit their car (my brother lives downtown Toronto so doesn't need one) and she figures I might as well inherit the Taurus now. But that has only been mentioned in passing so I don't know how serious she is about that at the moment. It is hers now but, regardless of which of us ends up with it, getting this rust repaired should buy us at least another five years of service from that car (as I believe you mentioned above).
 
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