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Discussion Starter #1
Periodically I've thought that I could tell the difference between iconic tonewoods such as Rosewood versus Mahogany versus maple but time and time again it's been proven that I can't. I accept the fact that I make very visual choices based on appearance including colour, figuring, Dark woods were my preference now I look to sustainability and more native and less exotic woods.
Godin I think, has led the way with their use of Canadian wild cherry. It's a decent choice with 10's of thousands of S6's in the hands of players. Lately my choices have been natural unstained Walnut and it has had nothing to do with tone and everything to do with appearance.
What are you choices?
 

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Periodically I've thought that I could tell the difference between iconic tonewoods such as Rosewood versus Mahogany versus maple but time and time again it's been proven that I can't. I accept the fact that I make very visual choices based on appearance including colour, figuring, Dark woods were my preference now I look to sustainability and more native and less exotic woods.
Godin I think, has led the way with their use of Canadian wild cherry. It's a decent choice with 10's of thousands of S6's in the hands of players. Lately my choices have been natural unstained Walnut and it has had nothing to do with tone and everything to do with appearance.
What are you choices?
Do you mean tonewise or appearance. To look at I can certainly distinguish between mahogany and rosewood. Distinguishing between different rosewoods I couldn't. As for tone I agree a lot of times hearing the differences can be very hard. I've heard mahogany guitars from Martin that I thought sounded like a D-28 and vice versa. Many variations in wood.
I played a custom shop Martin D-28 with Walnut back and sides at Folkway a few months ago that I thought sounded beautiful and looked gorgeous.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry I did mean tone, although I have never really thought about it. Hmmmmmm dyed the same colour with no extreme figuring........ I wonder?
 

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I can tell the difference between rosewood and mahogany. Rosewood has more bass. Depending on the guitar that can be a good thing or a bad thing. I choose the Martin D-18 (mahogany) over the Martin D-28 (rosewood) as I thought the D-28 had too much bass but I choose the Yamaha FG830 (rosewood) over the FG820 (mahogany) as I thought the FG820 was lacking in bass.
 

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Tone :
Personnally, I can't tell what it is when I listen or watch someone else playing. I can tell when I play and compare different instruments.
Sustainability :
I choose to buy sustainable when I buy new, anything when I buy used.
Perfectly happy with a sunburst J-15, kind of between mahogany and maple.
Would really like an L-200 maple with walnut f&b and bridge, ....hello Gibson!! or
Could Godin make an Art & Lutherie Legacy burbon busrt with walnut or ritchlite f&b instead of rosewood, 100% canadian....please c'mon uncle Robert :)
Dan
 

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Honestly, I would not say I would surely hear the difference between Mahogany and Rosewood. I guess I most of the time do especially when I may try both models side by side. Rosewood would be more bassy. I read some opinions elsewhere saying Rosewood would bring a few unwanted overtones. Not sure what it means...

In their quarterly Wood & Steel magazine, Taylor sometimes shows a comparative diagram of frequency resonnance range of the different tone woods they use : Rosewood shows a bit larger range than Mahogany. It would explain the boominess.

I have to say that the grading systems in their guitar catalog the makers use formerly guided me toward "greater quality" guitars. It was before my fingerpicking turn. I now certainly developed a better ear and it appeared that pricey Rosewood may not be the best for me.

I do have some great acoustics made of Mahogany or Rosewood. I once had a Taylor 712 Red Cedar/Rosewood : did not like it. I clearly prefer the 512 Mahogany I now have, but comparison is flawed since this one is a 1995 model, the last year Taylor used glued necks insted of bolted ones. Built differently.

Once had a Martin D-35 for her boominess over a D-28. Finally got tired of boominess...

My classics (Aria and Ramirez) are both Red Cedar/Rosewood. I love both. Never wished to try Mahogany made ones.

Overall, wood tone is not all... model and internal construction also count much in sound modulation.
 
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